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Academic Catalog 

2008-2009 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/catalogacademicc2008univ 



2008-2009 
Academic Catalog 

University of South Carolina Upstate 



Mailing Address: University of South Carolina Upstate 
800 University Way 
Spartanburg, South Carolina 29303 

Telephone: 864-503-5000 

The University of South Carolina Upstate is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools ( 1 866 Southern 
Lane, Decatur, Ga. 30033-4097; Telephone 404-679-4501 ) to award associate, baccalaureate and master's degrees. 

The University reserves the right to make changes in curricula, degree requirements, course offerings, and all academic regulations when in the judgment 
of the faculty, the chancellor, the president or the board of trustees such changes are in the best interest of the students and the University. 

Registration at the University assumes the student's acceptance of all published academic regulations, including those which appear in this catalog and 
all others found in any official announcement. 

The University of South Carolina Upstate is committed to a policy of affirmative action which assures equal opportunity in education and employment to 
all qualified persons regardless of race, sex, religion, creed, handicap, disability, veteran status, national origin or ancestry. 

I certify that this catalog is true and correct in content and policy and states progress requirements for graduation. 

John C. Stockwell. Ph.D. 
Chancellor, USC Upstate 

The University of South Carolina Upstate catalog is published yearly in Spartanburg, South Carolina. 



Table of Contents 



Academic Calendars 4 

The University 6 

Greenville Campus 13 

Admissions 16 

Financial Aid 25 

Fees and Expenses 37 

Student and Diversity Affairs 41 

Academic Regulations 47 

Academic Programs 61 

Honors Program 69 

use Upstate Academic Centers 73 

Center for Interdisciplinary Studies 74 

Center for Nonprofit Leadership 77 

Center for Women's & Gender Studies 79 

Watershed Ecology Center 80 

College of Arts and Sciences 81 

Fine Arts and Communication Studies 82 

Languages, Literature and Composition 93 

Department of Informatics 100 

Division of Mathematics and Computer Science 102 

Division of Natural Sciences and Engineering 108 

Psychology 114 

History, Political Science, Philosophy and American Studies 116 

Sociology, Criminal Justice and Women's Studies 121 

Johnson College of Business and Economics 126 

School of Education 131 

Mary Black School of Nursing 149 

Course Descriptions 160 

Graduate Studies 217 

Administration and Faculty 233 

Index 250 



Academic Calendar 2008-2009 



Fall 2008 

Thursday, Aug. 2 1 
Monday, Sept. 1 
Thursday-Friday, Oct. 9-10 
Tuesday, Nov. 4 

Wednesday-Sunday, Nov. 26-30 
Friday, Dec. 5 
Monday-Friday, Dec. 8-12 
Tuesday, Dec. 16 



Classes begin 

Labor Day (no classes) 

Fall break (no classes) 

General Election Day (no classes) 

Thanksgiving break 

Classes end 

Final exams 

Commencement 



Spring 2009 

Monday, Jan. 12 
Monday, Jan. 19 
Sunday-Sunday, March 8-15 
Monday, April 27 
Tuesday-Monday, April 28-May 4 
Tuesday, May 5 



Classes begin 

Martin Luther King Jr. Day (no classes) 

Spring break (no classes) 

Classes end 

Final exams 

Commencement 



Welcome ... 



Welcome to the University of South Carolina Upstate! 
At use Upstate we offer challenging, first-rate academic 
courses, small class sizes, personal experiences, remarkable 
diversity, an expansive international community, NCAA 
Division I Athletics, and a dynamic campus life. 

Our acclaimed and accredited academic programs create 
real opportunities for our students to build bridges to 
their future through internships, field service, study 
abroad, and more. USC Upstate inspires our students to 
grow intellectually, culturally, socially and emotionally. 
Students are also challenged to think critically and to 
prepare themselves for the professional challenges that 
lie ahead. 




Today, USC Upstate is among the fastest growing universities in South Carolina - with a 302-acre 
residential campus in Spartanburg, a commuter-campus at the University Center of Greenville and a 
planned campus for the George Dean Johnson, Jr. College of Business and Economics in downtown 
Spartanburg. Home to 5,000 students from 38 states and 71 nations, USC Upstate offers degree 
programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business administration, nursing and teacher education, as 
well as master's degrees in education. The Spartanburg campus, located in the Piedmont foothills, offers 
exceptional facilities such as the Humanities and Performing Arts Center, Campus Life Center, Susan 
Jacobs Arboretum, Palmetto House, the Louis P. Howell Athletic Complex, and the Health Education 
Complex, all of which are here to enrich your educational journey. The Greenville campus, located at 
the University Center of Greenville, a state-of-the-art teaching and learning center, is situated in an 
important hub in Greenville and surrounded by world-class manufacturing and business centers, both 
national and international. 



As you read through the pages of this catalog, please contact the Admissions Office at (864) 503-5246 
with any questions you may have. I wish you the best as you pursue your university education, and I 
hope to see you on campus in the near future! 



^ John C. Stockwell, Ph.D. 
Chancellor 




The University 



TheUniversityofSouthCarolinaUpstate(formerlyUSC 
Spartanburg), is a coeducational, public, comprehensive 
metropolitan institution that is located in Spartanburg along 
the thriving economic 1-85 corridor between Atlanta and 
Charlotte. The University's numerous partnerships with 
public and private corporations and other educational 
institutions, coupled with the mission to offer baccalaureate 
education to the citizens of the Upstate of South Carolina, 
led to a name change on June 30. 2004. 

As a senior comprehensive public institution of the 
University of South Carolina, the University's primary 
responsibilities are to offer baccalaureate education to 
the citizens of the Upstate of South Carolina and to offer 
selected master's degrees in response to regional demand. 
We offer bachelor's degree programs in the liberal arts 
and sciences, business administration, nursing and teacher 
education, as well as master's degrees in education. And 
we continue to create a host of new academic majors each 
year, most recently information management and systems, 
nonprofit administration, special education, graphic design, 
and a master's degree in teaching the visually impaired. 

Today. USC Upstate is among the fastest growing 
universities in South Carolina - with a 302-acre campus 
in Spartanburg, a commuter-campus at the University 
Center of Greenville and a planned campus for the George 
Dean Johnson, Jr. College of Business and Economics in 
downtown Spartanburg. 

The Spartanburg campus is a dynamic hub of activity. 
The Palmetto House, a $15.5 million residential facility 
for freshman students, boasts single and double occupancy 
rooms, computer labs, open areas, laundry facilities, postal 
center and housing management offices. It also provides 
students with a rich living and learning environment. 
Students often gather at the Louis P. Howell Athletic 
Complex, one of the Southeast's top sports venues, to cheer 
on the Spartans in baseball, softball, tennis and soccer. 

USC Upstate is home to 5,000 students from 38 states 
and 71 nations. It offers challenging, first-rate academic 
courses, small class sizes, personal experiences, remarkable 
diversity, an expansive international community, and 
a dynamic campus life. Our acclaimed and accredited 
academic programs create real opportunities for our 
students to build bridges to their future through internships, 
field service, study abroad, and more. 

USC Upstate inspires its students to grow intellectually, 
culturally, socially and emotionally. Students are also 
challenged to think critically and to prepare themselves for 
the professional challenges that lie ahead. As a first-year 
student, we don't expect you to have all of the answers. 
That's why we have an extensive network of academic 
support services to help guide the way, including our 
innovative Center for Student Success, Opportunity 
Network, the Writing Lab and Career Center. 

Just as it offers academic excellence, USC Upstate 
also offers a comprehensive athletics program competing 
on the NCAA Division I level as a member of the Atlantic 
Sun Conference. 

The Spartans currently field 15 varsity sports - 
basketball, soccer, tennis, golf, cross country, and track 



and field for both women and men; baseball for men; and 
Softball and volleyball for women. The USC Upstate 
athletics department is a diverse, dynamic, and widely 
successful arm of the university, one that promotes 
teamwork, leadership, and an overall sense of community 
both on campus and in the greater Upstate region of South 
Carolina. 

Parallel to the growth and expansion of the University 
is the steadily climbing base of USC Upstate alumni. Forty 
years after its founding, USC Upstate boasts an alumni 
base of more than 16,500; 85 percent of whom remain in 
the Upstate to build their lives and careers. 

Mission Statement 

The University of South Carolina Upstate aims to 
become one of the Southeast's leading "metropolitan" 
universities — a university that acknowledges as its 
fundamental reason for being its relationship to its 
surrounding cities, their connecting corridors and 
expanding populations. 

It aims to be recognized nationally among its peer 
metropolitan institutions for its excellence in education 
and commitment to its students, for its involvement in the 
Upstate, for its operational and managerial effectiveness, 
for its civility and common purpose, and for the clarity 
and integrity of its mission. 

As a senior comprehensive public institution of the 
University of South Carolina, the University's primary 
responsibilities are to offer baccalaureate education 
to the citizens of the upstate of South Carolina and to 
offer selected master's degrees in response to regional 
demand. 

Curricula and services are designed for the University's 
students, four to seven thousand in headcount. who are 
diverse in background, age, race, ethnicity, educational 
experience and academic goals. Students are drawn in 
large proportion from the Upstate where many choose to 
remain for their careers. A broad range of major curricula 
are provided in arts and sciences and in professional fields 
of study required by the regional economy, including 
business, education, and nursing. 

Through on-site instruction including comprehensive 
programming at the UniversityCenter of Greenville, 
distance learning, continuing education and inter- 
institutional articulation agreements, both traditional 
students and working professionals are served 
regionally. 

Consistent with the international character of the 
Upstate, the University promotes global perspectives across 
its programs, and, supporting the regional employment 
objectives of most of its students, it provides extensive 
experiential learning opportunities. 

The University's metropolitan mission rests upon a 
foundation of partnerships with the education, corporate 
and service organizations of the Upstate. The USC 
Upstate faculty provides leadership in promoting the 
Upstate's economic, social and cultural development 
through its teaching, professional service, basic and applied 
scholarship/research, and creative endeavors. 



The University 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



use Upstate strives to prepare its students to 
participate as responsible citizens in a diverse, global, and 
knowledge-based society, to pursue excellence in their 
chosen careers and to continue learning throughout life. 

Vision Statement 

use Upstate will emerge as "the metropolitan 
university of South Carolina" and one of the leading 
metropolitan universities of the Southeast, recognized as 
a center of superb teaching, experiential learning, regional 
partnerships, international opportunity, cultural diversity, 
and dynamic community activity. 

History 

The history of the University of South Carolina 
Upstate is a chronicle of remarkable development. In 
1967, the university was founded in response to efforts 
undertaken by G.B. Hodge, M.D., together with fellow 
members of the Spartanburg County Commission for 
Higher Education, and a remarkably strong founding 
faculty primarily to avert a serious health care labor 
shortage crisis when Spartanburg General Hospital 
announced plans to eliminate its diploma program for 
registered nurses. A citizen's committee investigated the 
situation and ultimately requested that Spartanburg be 
included in the University of South Carolina system. 

The Spartanburg Regional Campus, as it was first 
known, opened its doors in the fall of 1 967 to 1 77 students 
on the first floor of the Spartanburg General Hospital 
nursing residence. Enrollment continued to increase, which 
resulted in the school becoming a four-year university in 
1 975 and being renamed the University of South Carolina 
Spartanburg. 

Since its founding, USC Upstate has grown from a 
small, two-year campus into one of the leading metropolitan 
universities in the Southeast. This growth has been a direct 
response to the needs of the Upstate — a tradition that 
began with the University's creation. The University has 
expanded well beyond nursing to include 40 bachelor's 
programs in the liberal arts, sciences, business, information 
management and systems, teacher education and nursing. 
In 1 994, the University moved to the graduate level, with 
master's degree programs in elementary education and 
early childhood education. 

The University's numerous partnerships with public 
and pri\ ate corporations and other educational institutions, 
coupled with the mission to otter baccalaureate education to 
the citizens of the Upstate of South Carolina, led to a name 
change. On June 30, 2004, with USC Board of Trustees 
approval, USCS changed its name to the University of 
South Carolina Upstate. 

Accreditation 

The University of South Carolina Upstate is 
accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern 



Lane, Decatur, Ga. 30033-4097: Telephone 404-679- 
4501) to award associate, baccalaureate and master's 
degrees. Business programs are accredited by AACSB 
International — The Association to Advance Collegiate 
Schools of Business (600 Emerson Road, Suite 300, 
St. Louis, Mo. 63141-6762; Telephone 314-872-8481). 
Nursing programs are accredited by the National League 
for Nursing Accrediting Commission (61 Broadway, New 
York, N.Y. 10006; Telephone 1-800-669-1656: E-mail 
custhelp(tnnln.org). 

Undergraduate education programs are accredited 
by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education (2010 Massachusetts Ave. N.W., Suite 500, 
Washington D.C. 20036-1023; Telephone 202-466- 
7496). The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science 
program is accredited by ABET — Accreditation Board 
for Engineering and Technology Inc. (Ill Market Place, 
Suite 1 050, Baltimore, Md. 2 1 202-4002; Telephone 4 1 0- 
347-7700). 

Public Service 

In addition to academic excellence, USC Upstate 
is dedicated to public service activities. Among the 
University's initiatives in this area: 

The Scholars Academy is a joint venture of the 
University of South Carolina Upstate and the seven 
Spartanburg County school districts to provide advanced 
learners with a quality education in a supportive learning 
environment. Its mission is to attract and graduate students 
with a life-long passion for learning and compassion for 
others, and enable them to translate academic study and 
personal concern into effective leadership and action in 
their communities and the world. 

Ninth and tenth grade students are taught and super- 
vised primarily by a cadre of selected Spartanburg county 
school teachers. In addition, students take some college 
coursework. Eleventh and twelfth graders enroll in a 
combination of mostly Advanced Placement and college 
courses. Students graduate with a high school diploma 
and as much as two years of college course credits. 

Twenty-five students from seven Spartanburg county 
public high schools were invited to attend the Academy in 
its initial year of operation during the 2007-08 academic 
year. There is no charge for students to attend the Acad- 
emy as the project is funded through the Voluntary Public 
School Choice Grant program. For additional information, 
interested parents and students may visit the Scholars 
Academy website at the following address: http://www. 
uscupstate.edu/academics/education/scholars_academy 

USC Upstate administers ACHIEVE, a youth GED 
and employment program, in Cherokee, Spartanburg and 
Union counties. The program provides employability train- 
ing and job placement, instruction and career activities for 
high school dropouts. 

Upward Bound is a program of intensive instruction, 
tutoring, social and cultural activities designed to increase 
high school student's motivation and personal and aca- 
demic skills to levels necessary for success beyond high 



8 



The University 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



school. Upward Bound works primarily with students who 
are low-income and/or potential first generation college 
students. Upward Bound is totally funded by a Title IV 
grant awarded to the University of South Carolina Upstate 
by the U.S. Department of Education. 

Opportunity Network is a student support services 
program at USC Upstate made possible through a federal 
grant from the U.S. Department of Education. Earning an 
undergraduate degree can be extremely challenging, and 
Opportunity NeUvork offers support to students as they 
transition from high school to college and beyond. The 
program provides a wide variety of services, programs and 
support to assist college students as they strive to achieve 
their educational goals. Some of the specific services avail- 
able are academic advising, tutoring and mentoring, study 
skills workshops, cultural events, financial aid assistance 
and graduate school advising. First generation college 
students, low-income andor students with a learning or 
physical disability' may qualify for the program. Students 
who think they may be eligible to participate should visit 
www.uscupstate.eduyopportunitynetwork.html for more 
information. 

Thousands of public school students have participated 
in programs such as the Piedmont Regional Science 
Fair, an annual writing and art competition, and History 
Day. 

Each year the University offers a wide range of art 
exhibits, special lectures, music concerts, plays, and other 
special events for students and the community. Admission 
to these events is either free or at a nominal charge. 

Center for International Studies 

The Center for International Studies provides en- 
hanced international experiences for USC Upstate students 
and faculty members as well as interaction between the 
University and the international community. The Center 
assists with language development and translation services 
on and off campus. Due to reciprocal agreements with vari- 
ous universities abroad, USC Upstate offers students and 
faculty opportunities to study or pursue projects abroad. 
For international students, the Center provides curricular, 
personal and cultural assistance. International students 
should contact the Center for International Studies shortly 
after their arrival on campus for orientation and informa- 
tion relevant to beginning their college careers. 

Center for Student Success 

The Center for Student Success is a comprehensive 
academic support office on campus to assist students. Its 
principal mission is to work with the USC Upstate com- 
munity to promote student persistence by offering skilled 
advisement, tutoring, retention-related instruction, and 
other activities that clarify students' academic goals and 
enhance their ties to USC Upstate. The Center offers an 
array of services to assist students in their daily academic 
demands, such as free tutorial services, study skills and time 
management assistance, facilitation of study groups and 
Supplemental Instruction fordifificult courses, one-on-one 
consultations with students, referrals to other USC Upstate 



services, and much more. The Center also works closely 
with faculty and staff through its University 101 program 
for freshmen, the Early Intervention Program, and with 
classroom presentations and workshops as requested. 

Center for Undergraduate Research 
and Scholarship (CURS) 

The Center for Undergraduate Research and 
Scholarship provides programs and incentives to enhance 
the educational and professional development of USC 
Upstate students by supporting student-based research, 
scholarly, or creative activities. This Center provides, 
on a competitive basis, logistic and monetary support 
for the pursuit of student projects performed under the 
guidance of USC Upstate faculty, staff, and/or community 
professionals from throughout the Upstate region. The 
Center also assists students in traveling to professional 
meetings to present their work/findings, assists faculty/ 
staff who involve students in their research programs, and 
assists in arranging internships and directed studies for 
students in order to better prepare them for their fiiture 
professional careers. 

Veterans Affairs 

Students eligible to receive veterans' educational 
benefits should contact the veterans' coordinator located 
in the records office. Students receiving veterans' benefits 
are required to report any changes in curriculum, includ- 
ing courses dropped or added, absences and withdrawal. 
Failure to report such changes results in termination of 
benefits. 

Student Services 
Bookstore 

The USC Upstate Bookstore, located on the second 
floor of the Campus Life Center, carries textbooks, supple- 
mentary materials and supplies, clothing, items featuring 
the university name and logo, software, computers, maga- 
zines, newspapers, and student identification cards. It also 
houses the Spartanburg office of the Carolina Collegiate 
Federal Credit Union. The bookstore maintains a Web page 
at www.upstatebookstore.com that provides e-commerce 
and news on events and specials. 

Identification Cards 

The USC Upstate Bookstore provides identification 
cards for all students at USC Upstate. Each student will 
be provided the first ID card at no cost but each additional 
card will cost $ 1 0. Cards are automatically activated each 
semester when fees are paid. During a student's tenure at 
USC Upstate, the initial card is a valid one. ID cards are 
required to check out books in the library as well as for 
entry at certain events. 

Career Center 

The Career Center, a division of Academic Affairs, 
assists students in obtaining gainful employment during 
their tenure at the University as well as full-time place- 
ment after graduation. We provide valuable information 
regarding resume' and cover letter preparation, inter- 
viewing techniques and other tips to assist students with 



The University 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



their career goals. Through Internet searches, students 
can research information regarding employment trends, 
internships, and other career-related issues by accessing 
the computer lab in the Career Center Library. Students 
are encouraged to register on MonsterTRAK. which links 
them online to placement assistance for on- and otT-campus 
employment as well as internship opportunities. 

Child Care 

Children from 3 months to 6 years of age can be 
enrolled at the NAEYC accredited Burroughs Child De- 
velopment Center. The Center is open from 7:30 a.m. to 
5:30 p.m. weekdays and serves children of students, staff 
and faculty. Full- and part-time care is available. 

Dining Services 

Food serv ices management operations are contracted 
through Sodexho Campus Services. The Dining Services 
administrative office is located on the first floor of the 
Campus Life Center, adjacent to the cafeteria. A variety 
of food choices are available and may be purchased with 
cash, a declining-balance plan, or with a cost-saving meal 
plan. A valid University ID is required for all meal plan or 
declining-balance purchases. Meal plan contracts must 
be renewed each semester. 

Additional services include MochaPelli's, located in 
the Smith Building, and catering services for campus-re- 
lated events, including those sponsored by the community 
on our campus. Students residing on campus are required 
to purchase a meal plan. The Office of Dining Services 
offers employment opportunities for students with flexible 
hours, free meals and good pay. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

use Upstate has a broad-based intercollegiate ath- 
letic program for men and women. USC Upstate teams 
compete in NCAA Division II's Peach Belt Conference, 
which includes 1 1 other state-assisted schools in the 
Carolinas and Georgia. The University fields 1 1 varsity 
teams — basketball, soccer, golf and tennis for men and 
women in addition to baseball, softball and volleyball. 



The Campus 

Located conveniently along the thriving economic 1-85 
corridor between Atlanta and Charlotte, USC Upstate is set 
in the picturesque foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. 
TTie 302-acre campus features many new and sophisticated 
facilities. 

Administration Building. Opened in 1969 and 
renovated in 1988, this 41,000-square-foot building was 
the first facility constructed on the USC Upstate campus. 
It houses administrative offices, including the admissions 
and financial aid offices, in addition to classrooms. 

G.B. Hodge Center. Opened in 1973 and later 
expanded, the 45,000-square-foot Hodge Center houses 
classrooms, academic offices, a 1,650-seat gymnasium, 
an auxiliary gym, a weight room and athletics department 
offices. The building is named for Dr. G. B. Hodge, chairman 



emeritus of the Spartanburg County Commission for 
Higher Education. 

Media Building. This 44,000-square-foot building, 
opened in 1 978, houses classrooms, academic offices, and 
the studios of WRET-TV, a station of the South Carolina 
Educational Television Network. 

College of Arts and Science Building. Opened in 
1982, this 26,066-square-foot facility houses the offices 
and classrooms of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

University Police and Health Services. These 
two departments are housed in Building 1 of Palmetto 
Villas. 

Burroughs Child Development Center. Opened in 
1 976, the Center provides care for pre-school children, and 
gives students in the School of Education an opportunity 
to work with and observe young children. It is named 
for the late William J. Burroughs, who was a founding 
member of the Spartanburg County Commission for 
Higher Education in 1967. 

Susan B.Jacobs Arboretum. The 12-acre arboretum, 
named for Susan B. Jacobs who is a graduate of The Mary 
Black School of Nursing at USC Upstate, is located north 
of the Campus Life Center along Pollywood Creek. It 
features a 300-seat amphitheatre, lighted walkways, and 
foliage indigenous to the area. The Arboretum serves as 
the center of gravity for campus life and student activities 
and provides a place for relaxation, for the enjoyment 
and advancement of academic studies, for contemplation 
and reflection, and for cultural, social and entertainment 
events. 

Palmetto House. The $15 million, 105,000-square- 
foot facility opened in January 2004 provides housing for 
348 freshman. The complex consists of single and double 
occupancy rooms, open areas, and three recreation rooms. 
Each hall features a private study area and laundry facilities. 
This co-educational facility features controlled access, 
full sprinkler system. Internet access, cable television, 
computer lab, green space, and adjacent parking. 

Palmetto Villas. The University obtained ownership 
of this 12-building apartment complex in 1997. Each 
two-bedroom unit is furnished, air-conditioned, and has 
a kitchen with stove, refrigerator, dishwater and disposal. 
All units are networked as part of the USC Upstate system. 
A recreation area with pool, laundry and basketball and 
volleyball courts is available. University Commons houses 
348 upperclassman. 

John M. Rampey Center. Opened in 1992, this 
6,200-square-foot facility is primarily used for professional 
development and corporate training and continuing 
education classes. No academic classes utilize this 
facility. 

The Louis P. Howell Athletic Complex. The Athletic 
Complex is located in the northern section of the campus 
and includes the County University Soccer Stadium, 
Spartanburg County Youth Soccer Fields, Cleveland S. 
Harley Baseball Stadium, Cyrill Softball Stadium and 
Tennis Complex. These facilities are part of the recent 
construction and expansion efforts, which brings all 
athletic venues on campus, thus creating a greater sense 



10 



The University 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



of a campus community. 

Outdoor Recreational Facilities. A 1 .3-mile passage 
ofthe Palmetto Trail begins at the Louis P. Howell Athletic 
Complex and leads into a wooded forest on the banks of 
the Lawson's Fork Creek. Only hikers and bikers may use 
this section ofthe trail. Several other trails wind through 
the campus and more are currently under development. 
The use Upstate Challenge Course seeks to give students 
the opportunity to sharpen interpersonal skills through 
the facilitation of various activities and groups. Other 
recreation sites include intramural fields adjacent to 
the Palmetto House, and five fields used primarily for 
recreational soccer and similar use located on the west 
side ofthe campus. 

University Readiness Center. Opened in 2003, this 
50,000-square-foot facility is situated on a 12-acre site on 
the northern side ofthe campus. It provides office space 
for the South Carolina National Guard, multi-purpose 
meeting space, classrooms, hospitality rooms. ftiU kitchen 
facilities, and dressing rooms for athletic teams using the 
Louis P. Howell Athletics Complex. 

Campus Life Center. This 55,000-square-foot facility 
is the center of campus activity and the focal point of future 
growth onto the North Campus. The CLC houses Dining 
Services, the Bookstore, Student Affairs, the Counseling 
and Career Services Center, student organization offices, 
student publication offices, several meeting rooms, a 
computer lab and an automated teller machine. It is a 
gathering place for student organization and community 
meetings, receptions and other events. 

Kathyrn Hicks Visual Arts Center. Renovated 
in the summer of 2003, this facility provides space 
for art studios, graphic design, art imaging laboratory, 
sculpturing, printmaking, classrooms, faculty offices and 
exhibitions. 

Humanities and Performing Arts Center. Opened 
in 1990, this building features a 450-seat theater with 
a hydraulic pit lift, superb acoustics, and a ftilly rigged 
fly loft. The 54,000-square-foot building also houses 
classrooms, academic offices, a music recital hall, private 
practice rooms, art studios, an art gallery, foreign language 
and journalism labs. 

Horace C. Smith Science Building. Opened in 1985, 
the60,000-square-foot facility is home to academic offices, 
science laboratories and classrooms. 

Library. This 68,300-square-foot building, opened 
in 1977, houses a library with a collection of more than 
235,000 volumes, academic offices and classrooms. On 
the lower level, with a separate entrance, is the Tukey 
Theater, a 140-seat lecture hall named for the late Richard 
E. Tukey, who as head ofthe Spartanburg Chamber of 
Commerce was one ofthe community leaders instrumental 
in the establishment of USC Upstate. 

Health Education Complex. This 1 50,000-square- 
foot building will open in Fall 2008. It will house the Mary 
Black School ofNursing, School of Education, Enrollment 
Services, and Bookstore. Additionally a Wellness/Fitness 
Center- including a pool, racquetball and basketball courts, 
running track, climbing wall, and aerobics facilities - will 



provide first-rate recreation, exercise, and instructional and 
research opportunities for the campus community. 



DIRECTIONS TO CAMPUS 

From U.S. Hwy. 176/1-585 northbound Take the East 
Campus Boulevard exit. Go right at the end of the exit 
ramp onto East Campus Boulevard. The campus is on 
the left. 

From U.S. Hwy. 176/1-585 southbound - Take the East 
Campus Boulevard exit. Go left at the end ofthe exit ramp 
onto East Campus Boulevard. The campus is on the left. 

From Business 1-85 northbound - Use Exit 5-B. Mil- 
liken Road. Proceed along the frontage road parallel to 
Business 1-85 to the Milliken Bridge over Business 1-85, 
and turn left crossing over Business 1-85. At the four-way 
STOP at the end ofthe bridge, continue straight onto North 
Campus Boulevard into campus. 

From Business 1-85 southbound - Use Exit 6, SC 9. 
Proceed along the frontage road for approximately 1/2 
mile being careful not to re-enter Business 85. Turn right 
at the Milliken Bridge and follow North Campus Boule- 
vard to the campus. 

From 1-85 in either direction - Use Exit 72 onto U.S. 
1 76 toward Spartanburg. Take the East Campus Boulevard 
exit. Go left at the end ofthe exit ramp onto East Campus 
Boulevard. The campus is on the left. 

From 1-26 in either direction - Exit onto 1-85 north- 
bound, and follow the above directions. Using 1-85 instead 
of Business 1-85 is the preferable route. 



Campus map on next page 



The University 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



11 




1. Administrative Building 

2. Library 

3. Richard E. Tukey Theatre 

4. Horace C. Smith Science Building 

5. Art Gallery 

6. Humanities & Performing Arts Center 

7. Kathryn Hicks Visual Arts Center 

8. Campus Life Center 

9. College of Arts & Sciences Building 

10. College of Business/HPPA/Sociology 

11. Media BIdg./WRET-TV 

12. G.B. Hodge Center/Gymnasiums 

13. University Police/Health Services 



14. Burroughs Child Development Center 

15. Palmetto Villas 

16. Palmetto House 

17. Susan Jacobs Arboretum 

18. John M. Rampey Center 

19. Louis R Howell Athletic Complex 

20. Cyrill Softball Stadium 

21. Cleveland S. Harley Baseball Park 

22. County University Soccer Stadium 

23. Tennis Complex 

24. University Readiness Center 

25. Smith Farmhouse/Special Events 
26.Spartanburg County Youth Soccer Fields 



27. Support Facility/Central Receiving/ 
Postal Services/Printing Services 

28. Facilities Management Complex 

29. Honors House 

30. Academic Annex 1, 2 and 3 

31. Health Education Complex 
Mary Black School of Nursing 
School of Education 

32. Palmetto Landing 

33. Intramural Field 

34. Track & Field (future) 

35. Athletic Annex 

Revised July 2008 



12 



The University 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 




Greenville Campus 



use Upstate Greenville Campus 



The University of South Carolina Upstate's 
Green\ilie Campus is located at the University Center of 
Greenville, a nonprofit consortium of higher education 
institutions dedicated to increasing access to educational 
opportunities for the citizens of the Greater Greenville 
Metropolitan Area of South Carolina. Located at 225 
South Pleasantburg Drive in McAlister Square, the Uni- 
versity Center is a state-of-the-art teaching and learning 
center designed to ser\e traditional, undergraduate stu- 
dents as well as adults who want to pursue four-year or 
graduate-level degrees. Courses are otTered in both day 
and evening. 

In addition to the University of South Carolina 
Upstate, six universities are partners in the University 
Center: Clemson University, Furman University, Lander 
University, the Medical University of South Carolina, 
South Carolina State University and the University of 
South Carolina Columbia. 

The University of South Carolina Upstate otTers 
course work for the following degree programs: 

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice 

— Day Program 

The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice is 
designed to provide current and future criminal justice 
professionals with the educational background necessary to 
be successful in a criminal justice career, graduate school 
or law school. Students entering the criminal justice 
program at USC Upstate in Greenville begin at the junior 
level with courses in the study of crime, criminals, courts, 
policing, corrections and victims. The program involves 
the study of both theory and practice. A strong experiential 
component to the criminal justice program provides 
students with "real world" experience, including the 
opportunity to participate in summer field study programs. 
Students have the opportunity to complete internships with 
approved criminal justice agencies. Interns may work 
with federal, state or local law enforcement, community 
corrections programs, victim assistance programs, juvenile 
justice programs, private investigation firms, solicitors' 
offices, public defenders' offices, or other branches of 
the court system. 

Bachelor of Arts in Computer Information Systems 

— Evening Program 

The Bachelor of Arts in Computer Information 
Systems (CIS) is ideal for students who seek challenging 
careers in information technology (IT). The program 
provides rigorous and comprehensive instruction in all 
facets of information technology under two main focus 
areas: Networking & Information Security (NIS) and 
System Analysis (SA). In particular, the Networking & 
Information Security Focus emphasizes the connectivity, 
security, and in general, IT infrastructures in a corporate 
environment. Exciting courses in NIS include Advanced 
ComputerSecurity and Information Assurance, Advanced 
Networking, Digital Forensics, Cryptography. Wireless 
Networking, and Distributed and Network Programming. 
Career choices for graduates ofN IS include many "hot jobs" 
such as network administrators, system administrators. 



security specialists, database administrators, and IT 
managers. Students who prefer a career in system 
analysis and software design and development may want 
to choose the System Analysis Focus, with practical 
courses such as Object Oriented Analysis and Design, 
Data Stuctures and Algorithms, and Web Application 
Development, and a strong core of supporting courses in 
business administration. SA graduates are well prepared 
to develop software solutions for business and industries. 
Students in both NIS and S A are required to take Business 
courses such as Organizational Management & Behavior 
and Business Infonnation Systems to make sure they 
can effectively integrate IT solutions into business 
operations to achieve business objectives. Students with 
transfer coursework in computer/electonic engineering 
or computer technology should consider this degree. 
The degree also offers an opportunity for adults already 
working in information technology to update, continue 
their education, and to expand career opportunities. Please 
visit http://cs.uscupstate.edu for details. 

Bachelor of Arts in Information Management and 
Systems — Late Afternoon and Evening Programs 
(including online and teleconference courses) 

The Bachelor of Arts in Information Management 
and Systems degree is designed to position graduates 
at the forefront of information creation, access, analy- 
sis, and dissemination. Graduates enjoy information 
systems management careers in areas such as business, 
healthcare organizations, government agencies, and 
educational institutions. The multidisciplinary degree 
integrates an understanding of computer science, infor- 
mation science, telecommunications, discipline-spe- 
cific data, infonnation administration, and an ability to 
recognize relationships between technical systems and 
social structures. Courses emphasize basic quantitative 
and qualitative techniques, business functions, effective 
communications skills, and proactive team interactions. 
Concentration areas allow students to focus on the ap- 
plication of technology in one of four fields — business, 
communication, education and healthcare. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing — Day Program 

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree prepares 
the graduate to enter the discipline of professional 
nursing through education in clinical competencies and 
technical skills, as well as professional values and role 
development, on a foundation of prerequisite liberal arts 
and science. The program offers two tracks of study: the 
junior and senior years for students planning a career in 
professional nursing and an accelerated RN-BSN track 
for registered nurses who have graduated from associate 
degree or diploma programs in nursing. The curriculum 
is designed to prepare graduates who use critical thinking, 
effective communication, and professional behavior in the 
provision of safe, competent, and holistic nursing care in 
a variety of acute care and community health settings. 
Experienced academic and clinical faculty provide 
students opportunities to learn health promotion, illness 



14 



USC Upstate Greenville Campus 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



management, health care technologies and evidence based 
clinical practice. The bachelor's degree positions the 
graduate for advancement in nursing practice and serves 
as a basis for graduate study in nursing. 

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with 
concentrations in: 

Management Accounting — Evening Program 
and General Business Administration 

— Day and Evening Programs 
The Bachelor ofScience in Business Administration 
allows students the opportunity to work toward a variety 
of career goals in management accounting and general 
business administration. Quality across the curriculum 
is a priority, and to ensure that the highest standards are 
consistently met, the School of Business Administration 
and Economics completed the rigorous process of earning 
accreditation from AACSB International. The Association 
to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Accreditation 
by AACSB is regarded internationally as an indication 
of excellence in instruction and training. Fewer than 15 
percent of business programs worldwide have earned this 
prestigious seal of approval. Eaminga business degree from 
use Upstate will allow students to rightfully claim to be 
a graduate of a internationally recognized program. 

Bachelor ofScience in Engineering 
Technology Management — Evening Program 

The Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technol- 
ogy Management (ETM) was designed for engineering 
technology associate's degree holders who wish to earn 
a bachelor's degree with only an additional two years of 
coursework. Students enroll in the program if they possess 
or are near completion of an associate degree in engineer- 
ing technology. The program is ideal for technicians who 
desire the management skills necessary to be an effec- 
tive interface between technicians and upper managers. 
It uses a comprehensive blend of management, business, 
economics, and communications courses to build a layer 
of management knowledge and skills on students' techni- 
cal foundation. ETM courses include cost analysis, work 
analysis, systems decision making, quality practices, and 
project management. Industry projects integrated with 
traditional coursework enable students to apply theory 
in realistic management situations. The ETM degree will 
open doors for advancement and give students the ability 
and confidence to step through those doors. Visit www. 
uscupstate.edu/etm for more information. 

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science 
in Interdisciplinary Studies 

— Day and Evening Programs 

The Interdisciplinary Studies major provides 
a degree opportunity to students whose educational 
backgrounds or life and career plans are non-traditional. 
With the help of an advisor, students design individualized 
programs of study combining coursework in a variety 
of disciplines not possible in other degree programs 
and may take advantage of 36 elective hours to explore 
many different courses of study or to concentrate in one 
selected discipline. 



Education Programs 

use Upstate in Greenville offers instruction in early 
childhood education, elementary education, middle grades 
education and special education: learning disabilities. 
Although the curriculum and requirements of each 
program are different, the overriding philosophy of each is 
common — to prepare students to be reflective practitioners 
of teaching, with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions 
necessary to meet the needs of all learners in today's public 
school classrooms. USC Upstate in Greenville students 
develop leadership skills to reinvigorate schools, promote 
business and school partnerships, and ensure quality 
education for all students. 

Bachelor of Arts in Early Childhood Education 

— Day Program 

The Bachelor of Arts in Early Childhood Education 
provides preparation for teaching in four- and five- 
year kindergartens and in grades 1-3. The professional 
sequence provides content and direct opportunities for 
field experience. The final semester is a ftill-time student 
teaching assignment in a K-3 setting. 

Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education 

— Day & Evening Programs 

The Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education 
prepares students to teach in grades 2-6. The program 
at USC Upstate in Greenville consists of professional 
educational preparation and direct opportunites for field 
experience. During the semester in which students are 
enrolled in directed teaching, they spend each school 
day for a period of 1 5 weeks in the elementary school to 
which they are assigned. 

Bachelor of Arts in Middle Grades Education 

— Day Program 

The program in Middle Grades Education prepares 
students to teach in grades 5-8. This is achieved through 
the core of general liberal arts coursework, professional 
education coursework, clinical experiences, student 
teaching in middle school settings, and intensive study in 
two areas of academic concentration. The final semester is 
a full-time student teaching assignment in a middle school 
in both academic areas. 

Bachelor ofScience in Special Education: 
Learning Disabilities — Day Program 

The Bachelor of Science in Special Education: Learning 
Disabilities prepares fiiture teachers to serve the needs of 
special education students with learning disabilities in both 
traditional classrooms and special education resource rooms. 
Preparation for teaching students with learning disabilities 
emphasizes appropriate services, curricula, assessment, and 
instruction required to facilitate participation in the K-12 
general education curriculum. Technology, collaborative 
and consultation skills, applications of research, and parent 
consultation skills are stressed throughout the program. 

Information on each of the programs offered by 
USC Upstate in Greenville may be obtained by calling the 
USC Upstate Office Greenville Campus at 864-552-4242. 
or 864-503-5113. An advisor will be available to provide 
transcript evaluation and to help students develop a program 
of study. 



use Upstate Greenville Campus 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



15 




Admissions 



Undergraduate Admission 



4. Interviews and Campus Visits 



The University of South Carolina Upstate seeks to 
enroll students who will benefit from and contribute to the 
University'. USC Upstate encourages all qualified students 
to apply for admission. Candidates for admission should 
possess the academic background to indicate the potential 
for collegiate success. Admission to USC Upstate does not 
guarantee or imply admission to any university program. 
The University of South Carolina is committed to the policy 
and practice of affirmative action and equal opportunity 
in education for all qualified persons regardless of race, 
color, religion, sex, disabilit>' or national origin. 

Requests for undergraduate application forms and 
catalogs should be addressed to the Office of Admissions. 
The Office of Admissions is open Monday through Friday 
and is located on the second floor of the Administration 
Building. 

Phone: 864-503-5246 Spartanburg 

864-271-9111 Greenville 
1-800-277-8727 Elsewhere 

Fax: 864-503-5727 

E-Mail: admissions(S;uscupstate.edu 

Home Page: www.uscupstate.edu 

Application Procedures 

1. Application 

Prospective students should submit a completed applica- 
tion to the Office of Admissions with a non-refundable 
S40 application fee. 

2. Transcripts 

All freshman applicants must submit transcripts of their 
high school record from the present or last high school at- 
tended. Applicants who attend a post-secondary institution 
while in high school or during the summer are classified 
as freshmen. However, official transcripts of the college 
work must be submitted. Transfer applicants must submit 
a transcript mailed directly to the USC Upstate Office of 
Admissions from each college attended. Transfer stu- 
dents with less than 30 semester hours of college credit 
are required to submit a high school transcript. It is the 
applicant's responsibility to have the required documenta- 
tion forwarded to the Office of Admissions. All transcripts 
become permanent records of USC Upstate and will not 
be forwarded or returned. 

3. Test Scores 

All applicants who are 21 years of age or younger, with 
the exception of transfer applicants who have completed 
at least 30 semester hours of college credit, must submit 
results of the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) or the 
American College Testing program (ACT). 



Although not required, students are encouraged to visit 
USC Upstate to meet with university representatives and 
tour the campus. Appointments should be scheduled by 
calling the Office of Admissions. 

Each applicant will be notified when an application 
for admission is received by the Office of Admissions 
and an admission decision will be made upon receipt of 
required documents. Decisions for admission are made 
on a rolling basis. 

Categories of Admission 

I. Degree-Seeking Admission 

A. Freshman Admission 

a. High school diploma or equivalent (GED 
certificate) 

b. Scholastic .'\ssessment Test (SAT) scores 
or American College Testing Program 
(ACT) scores 

Non-traditional or Adult Students 

Applicants who are 22 years of age or older are not required 
to submit SAT/ ACT scores. However, students should 
present evidence of ability for academic success. 
Applicants who are interested in receiving credit by exam, 
military credit or credit for non-collegiate programs should 
refer to page 56 for more information. 

Freshman High School Course Requirements 

Students should prepare forthe challenges at USC Upstate 
by taking a rigorous academic curriculum while in high 
school. Students who graduated from high school in 2001 
or after are required to have completed the following high 
school units: 

Area Units Description 

English 4 At least two units having strong 

grammar and composition 
components; at least one unit in 
English literature; and at least 
one unit in American literature 
(completion ofcoUege prepara- 
tory English I, II, III and IV will 
meet requirements). 

Mathematics 3 Algebra I & II; geometry, a 

fourth unit is strongly rec- 
ommended. Applied Math I & 
II may substitute for Algebra 
I if Algebra II is successfiiUy 
completed. 



Laboratory Science* 3 



Two units must be taken in two 
different fields such as biology, 
chemistry orphysics. Thethird 
may be from the same field as 
one of the first two or from any 
lab science where biology and 
chemistry is a prerequisite. 



continued on next page 



Admissions 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



17 



continued 
Foreign Language 



U.S. History 



Social Studies 



Physical Education 1 
or koTC 



Two units of the same 
foreign language. A third is 
strongly recommended. 



Economics and Government 
are strongly recommended. 



Electives* 4 From at least three different 

fields. You may select from 
computer science, English, 
fine arts, humanities, math 
(above Algebra 11), social 
science, foreign language 
and other college prepara- 
tory courses 

* Students who graduated from high school between 1 988- 
2000 must meet the above requirements. However, these 
students need 2 rather than 3 laboratory sciences and I 
rather than 4 electives. 

Assessment of Academic Records 

Freshman applicants who satisfy the course requirements 
listed above will be evaluated on the basis of high school 
curriculum, grades, and SAT or ACT scores. These fac- 
tors will be used to determine the applicant's probability 
of success during the freshman year. 

Exception to admissions requirements will be considered 
for applicants who can present extenuating circumstances. 
Where appropriate, the admissions office will refer such 
cases to the faculty admissions and petitions committee. 

Typically, any student admitted with a high school course 
deficiency will be required to successfully complete 
an equivalent course in their first 30 semester hours of 
coursework at USC Upstate. 

B. Transfer Admission 

A transfer applicant is a student who has attended another 
post-secondary institution after graduation from high 
school regardless of the amount of credit earned at that 
institution. Applicants must submit transcripts of all previ- 
ous college courses whether or not credit was earned and 
regardless of whether the applicant wishes to transfer any 
credit. Failure to report all colleges attended may constitute 
immediate cancellation of admission and/or registration. 
Transfer requirements are listed below. 

a. A minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA in all 
previous college-level course work. 

b. Evidence that the applicant is academically 
and otherwise eligible to return to the last 
institution attended. 

c. If fewer than 30 semester hours of college- 
level work have been completed, the applicant 
must meet both freshman and transfer 
requirements. 



Transfer applicants who have not attended school for two 
years or longer and are at least 22 years of age. may be 
eligible for probationary admission even if they do not 
meet GPA requirements. Students who are on academic 
probation must obtain at least a 2.0 average on the first 12 
or more grade hours attempted under this status. These 
hours may be taken over more than one semester. Students 
failing to meet this requirement are suspended. Students 
who leave the University without completing a term of 
probation, and are absent for three or more years, will 
begin a new term of probation upon readmission. 

Transfer students are informed by the Admissions Of- 
fice, dean or division chair of their major of the amount 
of credit which will transfer, usually prior to enrollment, 
but at least prior to the end of the first academic term in 
which they are enrolled. 

Transfer Credit 

The transcript of a transfer student is evaluated by the dean 
of the school or college in which he or she matriculates. If 
no major or an undeclared major is indicated at the time of 
application, the transcript will be evaluated in the Office 
of Academic Advising. 

USC Upstate does not limit the number of hours trans- 
ferred for degree credit from a senior college that is ac- 
credited by a regional association such as the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools. A maximum of 76 
semester hours may be transferred for degree credit from a 
junior college or two-year institution that is accredited by 
a regional accrediting association. USC Upstate requires 
that every student meet the academic residency require- 
ments (page 59) before a degree is awarded. 

A student transferring from a four-year institution not 
accredited by the appropriate regional accrediting as- 
sociation may validate hours earned at the nonaccredited 
institution by successful completion of 15 hours at USC 
Upstate with a minimum 2.0 GPA. Credits earned at 
two-year nonaccredited institutions may be validated by 
examination. Exemption credit or acceptance of transfer 
credit by another college has no bearing on the evaluation 
of transfer credit at USC Upstate. 

As a general rule, some courses are not acceptable in 
transfer to USC Upstate or to the other campuses of the 
University of South Carolina. Included are occupational 
or technical courses, remedial courses, courses from a 
two-year college that are considered upper-level at the 
University, or courses from a two-year college that are 
not part of that institution's college transfer program. 
Exceptions to this rule may be made only by the dean of 
the student's school or college or by the vice chancellor 
for academic affairs. Exceptions are made only in specific 
cases where the courses being considered for transfer are 
judged to be uniquely relevant to the student's degree 
program. 

A course completed at another college or university in 
which a student earns a grade below C cannot be trans- 
ferred. USC Upstate uses all grades (with the exception 
of grades for remedial courses and courses taken on a 
pass-fail basis) listed on transcripts of other institutions in 



18 



Admissions 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



the calculation of the transfer GPA. Therefore, the GPA as 
calculated by USC Upstate may be different than the one 
appearing on the transcript of another institution. A GPA 
calculated by USC Upstate will be used in determining 
admission to USC Upstate or to a particular program. 



TRANSFER: State Policies and Procedures 
Regulations and Procedures for Transfer in Public 
Two-Year and Public Four- Year Institutions in South 
Carolina Mandated by Act 137 of 1995 

BACKGROUND 

Section 1 0-C ofthe South Carolina School-to-Work Transi- 
tion Act ( 1994) stipulates that the Council of College and 
University Presidents and the State Board for Technical 
and Comprehensive Education, operating through the 
Commission on Higher Education, shall develop better 
articulation of associate and baccalaureate degree pro- 
grams. To comply with this requirement the Commission, 
upon the advice ofthe Council of Presidents, established 
a Transfer Articulation Policy Committee composed of 
four-year institutions' vice presidents for academic affairs 
and the associate director for instruction ofthe State Board 
for Technical and Comprehensive Education. The principal 
outcomes derived from the work of that committee and 
accepted by the Commission on Higher Education on 
July 6, 1995, were: 

An expanded list of 86 courses which will transfer to four- 
yearpublic institutions of South Carolina from the two-year 
public institutions; a statewide policy document on good 
practices in transfer to be followed by all public institutions 
of higher education in the State of South Carolina, which 
was accepted in principle by the Advisory Committee on 
Academic Programs and the Commission; six task forces 
on statewide transfer agreements, each based in a discipline 
or broad area ofthe baccalaureate curriculum. 

In 1995. the General Assembly passed Act 137 which 
stipulated further that the South Carolina Commission 
on Higher Education "notwithstanding any other provi- 
sion of whom to the contrary, shall have the following 
additional duties and functions with regard to the various 
public institutions of higher education." These duties and 
responsibilities include the Commission's responsibility 
"to establish procedures for the transferability of courses 
at the undergraduate level between two-year and four-year 
institutions or schools." This same provision is repeated in 
the legislation developed from the Report ofthe Joint Leg- 
islative Study Committee, which is now moving through 
the General Assembly during the 1996 session. 

Act 137 directs the Commission to adopt procedures for 
the transfer of courses from all two-year public to all 
four-year public institutions of higher education in South 
Carolina. Proposed procedures are listed below. Unless 
otherwise stated, these procedures shall become effec- 
tive immediately upon approval by the Commission and 
shall be fully implemented, unless otherwise stated, by 
September 1, 1997. 



STATEWIDE ARTICULATION OF 86 COURSES 

1 . The Statewide Articulation Agreement of 86 cours- 
es approved by the South Carolina Commission on 
Higher Education for transfer from two- to four-year public 
institutions shall be applicable to all public institutions, 
including two-year institutions and institutions within 
the same system. In instances where an institution does 
not have synonymous courses to ones on this list, it shall 
identify comparable courses or course categories for ac- 
ceptance of general education courses on the statewide 
list. (See pages 23-24 for course listings.) 

ADMISSIONS CRITERIA, COURSE GRADES, 
GPAs, VALIDATIONS 

2. All four-year public institutions shall issue annually 
in August a transfer guide covering at least the following 
items: 

A. The definition of a transfer student and require- 
ments for admission both to the institution and, if 
more selective, requirements for admission to par- 
ticular programs. 

B. Limitations placed by the institution or its 
programs for acceptance of standardized examina- 
tions (e.g., SAT, ACT) taken more than a given 
time ago, for academic course work taken else- 
where, for course work repeated due to failure, 
for course work taken at another institution while 
the student is academically suspended at his/her 
home institution, and so forth. 

C. Institutional and, if more selective, programmatic 
maximums of course credits allowable in transfer 

D. Institutional procedures used to calculate student 
applicants' GPAs for transfer admission. Such 
procedures shall describe how nonstandard grades 
(withdrawal, withdrawal failing, repeated course, 
etc.) are evaluated; and they shall also describe 
whether all course work taken prior to transfer 

or just course work deemed appropriate to the 
student's intended four-year program of study is 
calculated for purpose major. 

E. Lists of all courses accepted from each technical 
college (including the 86 courses in the Statewide 
Articulation Agreement) and the course equivalen- 
cies (including & "free elective"; category) found 
on the home institution for the courses accepted. 

F. Lists of all articulation agreements with any 
public South Carolina two-year or other institution 
of higher education, together with information 
about how interested parties can access these 
agreements. 

G. Lists ofthe institution's Transfer Officer(s) person- 
nel together with telephone and fax numbers and 
office address and e-mail address. 



Admissions 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



19 



H. Institutional policies related to "academic bank 
ruptcy" (i.e., removing an entire transcript or parts 
thereof from a failed or underachieving record 
after a period of years has passed) so that reentry 
into the four-year institution with course credit 
earned in the interim elsewhere is done without 
regard to the student's earlier record. 

I. "Residency requirements" for the minimum 
number of hours required to be earned at the 
institution for the degree. 

3. Course work (individual courses, transfer blocks, state- 
wide agreements )coveredwithinthese procedures shal I be 
transferable if the student has completed the course work 
w ith a "C" grade (2.0 on a 4,0 scale) or above, but transfer 
of grades does not relieve the student of the obligation to 
meet any GPA requirements or other admissions require- 
ments of the institution or program to which application 
has been made. 

A. Any four-year institution which has institutional or 
programmatic admissions requirements for transfer 
students with cumulative grade point averages 
(GPAs) higher than 2.0 on a 4.0 scale shall 

apply such entrance requirements equally to 
transfer students from regionally accredited South 
Carolina public institutions regardless of whether 
students are transferring from a four-year or two- 
year institution. 

B. Any multi-campus institution or system shall 
certify by letter to the Commission that all course 
work at all of its campuses applicable to a particu- 
lar degree program of study is fully acceptable in 
transfer to meet degree requirements in the same 
degree program at any other of its campuses. 

4. Any course work (individual courses, transfer blocks, 
statewide agreements) covered within these procedures 
shall be transferable to any public institution without any 
additional fee and without any further encumbrance such 
as a "validation examination." "placement examination/ 
instrument," "verification instrument," or any other stric- 
ture, notwithstanding any institutional or system policy, 
procedure, or regulation to the contrary. 

TRANSFERBLOCKS,STATEWlDEAGREEMENTS, 
COMPLETION OF THE AA/AS DEGREE 

5. The following Transfer Blocks /Statewide Agreements 
taken at any two-year public institution in South Carolina 
shall be accepted in their total ity toward meeting baccalau- 
reate degree requirements at all four-year public institutions 
in relevant four-year degree programs, as follows: 

Arts. Humanities, and Social Sciences : Established cur- 
riculum block of 46-48 semester hours. 

Business Administration: Established curriculum block 
of 46-5 1 semester hours. 



Engineering: Established curriculum block of 33 semester 
hours. 

Science and Mathematics: Established curriculum block 
of 51-53 semester hours. 

Teacher Education: Established curriculum block of 38-39 
semester hours for Early Childhood, Elementary, and Spe- 
cial Education students only. Secondary education majors 
and students seeking certification who are not majoring in 
teacher education should consult the Arts, Humanities, and 
Social Sciences or the Math and Science transfer blocks, 
as relevant, to assure transferability of course work. 

*Nursing: By statewide agreement, at least 60 semester 
hours shall be accepted by any public four-year institution 
toward the baccalaureate completion program (BSN) from 
graduates of any South Carolina public associate degree 
program in nursing (ADN), provided that the program is 
accredited by the National League of Nursing and that 
the graduate has successfully passed the National Licen- 
sure Examination (NCLEX) and is a currently licensed 
Registered Nurse. 

6. Any "unique" academic program not specifically 
or by extension covered by one of the statewide transfer 
blocks/agreements listed in #4 above shall either create 
its own transfer block of 35 or more credit hours with the 
approval of CHE staffer shall adopt either the Arts/Social 
Science/Humanities or the Science/Mathematics block by 
September, 1996. The institution at which such program 
is located shall infonn the staff of the CHE and every 
institutional president and vice president for academic 
affairs about this decision. 

7. Any student who has completed either an Associate of 
Arts or Associate of Science degree program at any public 
two-year South Carolina institution which contains within 
it the total course work found in either the Arts/Social 
Sciences/Humanities Transfer Block or the Math/Science 
Transfer Block shall automatically be entitled to junior- 
level status at whatever public senior institution to which 
the student might have been admitted. 



RELATED REPORTS AND STATEWIDE 
DOCUMENTS 

8. All applicable recommendations found in the Commis- 
sion's report to the General Assembly on the School-to- 
Work Act (approved by the Commission and transmitted 
to the General Assembly on July 6, 1995) are hereby 
incorporated into the procedures for transfer of course 
work among two- and four-year institutions. 

9. The policy paper entitled State Policy on Transfer 
and Articulation, as amended to reflect changes in the 
numbers of transfer blocks and other Commission action 
since July 6, 1995, is hereby adopted as the statewide 
policy for institutional good practice in the sending and 
receiving of all course credits to be transferred. 



20 



Admissions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



ASSURANCE OF QUALITY 

10. All claims from any public two- or four-year institu- 
tion challenging the effective preparation of any other 
public institution's course work for transfer purposes shall 
be evaluated and appropriate measures shall be taken 
to reassure that the quality of the course work has been 
reviewed and approved on a timely basis by sending and 
receiving institutions alike. This process of formal review- 
shall occur every four years through the staff of the Com- 
mission on Higher Education, beginning with the approval 
of these procedures. 



CHIEF TRANSFER OFFICERS 

Donette Stewart, 

Assistant Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Services 

864-503-5246, dstewart@uscupstate.edu 

Star Jamison 

Transfer Coordinator 

864-503-5902, sjamison@uscupstate.edu 

C. Readmission 

Students whose undergraduate attendance at any USC 
campus has been interrupted for any reason for one or more 
major semesters ( spring/fall) must apply for readmission. 
An application fee of $ 1 is required if you have attended 
USC Upstate. Readmission to USC Upstate and to the 
program in which the student was previously enrolled is 
not automatic. Former students who have attended other 
institutions after leaving the University of South Carolina 
are considered transfer students and should follow the 
procedures for transfer admission. Students who wish 
to return to the University after being suspended should 
refer to page 53 for more information. Students who are 
on academic probation must obtain at least a 2.0 average 
on the first 1 2 or more grade hours attempted under this 
status. These hours may be taken over more than one 
semester. Students failing to meet this requirement are 
suspended. Students who leave the University without 
completing a term of probation, and are absent for three 
or more years, will begin a new term of probation upon 
readmission. 

Registration 

Upon readmission, students should contact the office of 
their major for an advisement and registration appoint- 
ment. 

D. International 

Applicants who are citizens of a country other than the 
United States and who do not have permanent resident 
status are classified as international students. In addition 
to meeting general admissions requirements, applicants 
are required to: 

a. submit official school records (transcripts, diplomas 
or certificates ofstudy), translated to English;transcripts 



must be evaluated by World Education Services (WES) 
to receive transfer credit, WES applications are available 
in the admissions office; 

b. present a minimum Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL) score of 500 (paper based) or 173 
(computer based); TOEFL is not required of students 
whose native language is English; 

c. be academically and otherwise eligible to return to 
the last college attended; 

d. have a minimum SAT score of 850; 

e. provide documentation of health insurance; 

f. meet fi"eshman/transfer requirements if applicant 
has attended school in the United States; and 

g. submit bank statements or certified statement of 
financial ability to pay all education expenses. 

It is suggested that international students submit applica- 
tion and credentials at least 90 days before the beginning 
of the term for which he/she is applying. A Certificate 
of Eligibility (FORM 1-20) is issued to those applicants 
who meet all requirements for admission to a fiill-time 
degree program. 



II. Non-Degree Seeking Admission 

Applicants who wish to attend USC Upstate for one se- 
mester or on some limited basis, and who do not intend to 
pursue a degree at USC Upstate, may be approved to do 
so by submitting a Non-Degree Application for Admission 
and a $10 non-refundable application fee. The Office 
of Admissions reserves the right to determine the proper 
category of admission and to determine what credentials 
may be required. Applicants who have been officially 
denied admission are not eligible as non-degree candidates. 
Students wishing to take any economics (SECO) or busi- 
ness (SBAD) courses must meet the required prerequisites. 
These prerequisites will be verified by the School of Busi- 
ness in order for students to remain in class. Verification 
can include a transcript or grade reports. 

A. Concurrent High School Seniors 

High school seniors may enroll in university cours- 
es for college credit. To be considered for this 
program applicants must submit a SAT score (1000 
minimum) and obtain written recommendation from 
their high school principal or guidance counselor 
indicating the courses to be taken at USC Upstate. 

B. Transient 

Admission to undergraduate courses for one semes- 
ter or summer school may be granted to students from 
other colleges and universities who are certified to 
be in good academic standing and whose program of 
study is approved by that institution. 

C. Audit 

Applicants who wish to take USC Upstate courses 
without earning credit may apply for admission as an 
audit student. Auditing is granted on a space-avail- 
able basis only. 



Admissions 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



21 



D. Undergraduates with a Bachelor's Degree 

Students who hold a baccalaureate degree may be 
admitted to undergraduate credit courses upon sub- 
mission of a transcript showing graduation with a 
bachelor's degree or a copy of a college diploma. 
A transcript is needed if the applicant would like 
assistance in selecting appropriate courses. This 
category is designed for students who are seeking 
teacher accreditation or professional development. 

E. Other 

Students who would like to take courses for personal 
enrichment or professional enhancement may be 
admitted to take up to 30 semester hours of credit. 
After 30 semester hours of credit, a student may apply 
for admission as a degree candidate. Transcripts are 
required from the last institution attended to validate 
that the student is in good academic standing. 

Registration 

Applicants will be notified of registration procedures by 
the Office of Admissions. 



prior to registration. Foreign language testing is required 
for all new freshmen and some transfer students. 

Transfer students should set up an appointment with the 
testing coordinator in the Office of Admissions to schedule 
any necessary advisement testing. 

Housing 

Campus Housing is provided in two complexes at USC 
Upstate. Palmetto House, a recently completed traditional- 
style residence hall, houses 348 freshman in single and 
double rooms. Palmetto Villas, an apartment-style complex 
reserved for upperclassman, is home to 400 students. 

Applications for housing are processed through the Office 
of Admissions. On-campus housing at USC Upstate is very 
popular and space is limited. Students are encouraged to 
apply as early as possible. 



III. Senior Citizens 

Section 59- 1 1 1 -320 of the Code of Laws of South Carolina, 
1976, as amended, authorizes state-assisted universities 
to permit South Carolina residents who have attained 
the age of 60 to attend classes on a space-available basis 
without payment of tuition if these persons do not receive 
compensation as full-time employees. Applicants must 
submit an application and a $40 non-refundable degree- 
seeking application fee or a $10 non-refundable non- 
degree-seeking application fee. Candidates are required 
to meet admission standards and may take classes for 
credit or audit. 

Immunization 

Before enrollment, all students bom after 1956, are 
required to provide proof of immunization against measles, 
mumps and rubella. A completed immunization form 
or copy of an official immunization record, signed by a 
physician, should be mailed to the USC Upstate Office 
of Health Services. Questions regarding immunization 
should be directed to health services at 864-503-5197. 

New Student Services 



Orientation and Registration 

New freshman and transfer students will choose from 
several orientation and registration dates. Reservations 
are made through the Oftice of Admissions. During the 
session, students will meet with an advisor and register 
for classes. Special programs and campus tours are also 
provided. 

Advisement Testing 

New freshman are encouraged to complete math and 
English testing before orientation according to guidelines 
mailed to students after admission. Testing is required 



22 



Admissions 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



use Upstate 

Accounting 
SBAD 225 
SBAD 226 

Anthropology 
SANT102 



Transfer Guide for South Carolina Teclinical Colleges 

Tech Colleges Semester Hours 



ACC 101 
ACC 102 



ANT 101 



Astronomy 






SAST111+L 


AST 101 


4 


ELECTIVE 


AST 102 


4 


Art 
SATH 101 


ART 101 


3 


ELECTIVE 


ART 105 


3 


SATH 105 


ART 107 


3 


SATH 106 


ART 108 


3 


SART108 


ARV 110 or 217 


3 


SART103 


ARV 121 


3 


SART104 


ARV 122 


3 


SART110 


ART 111 


3 


SART202 


ART 202 


3 


SART204 


ARV 244 


3 


SART 205 


ARV 210 


3 


SART206 


ARV 205 


3 


SART 207 


ARV 207 


3 


SART 210 


ART 112 


3 


SART 211 


ART 211 


3 


SART 214 


ARV 261 


3 


SART 228 


ARV 230 


3 


SART 261 


ARV 114 


3 


SART 311 


ARV 241 


3 


SART 314 


ARV 262 


3 


SART 318 


ARV 227 


3 


SART 361 


ARV 214 


3 


SART 362 


ARV 21 5 


3 


ELECTIVE 


CGC 278 


3 


ELECTIVE 


ARV 280 


3 


ELECTIVE or SART 398 ARV 289 


3 


ELECTIVE or SART 398 ART 290 


3 


Bioloay 






SBIO110 


BIO 101 or 105 


4 


SBIO101&102 


BIO 101 & 102 


8 


SBIO102 


BIO 201 


4 


SBIO101 


BIO 202 


4 


SBIO 270&L 


BIO 205 & 206 


4 


SBIO 232&242 


BIO 210 & 211 


8 


ELECTIVE IV 


BIO 225 


4 


SBIO 232 


BIO 215 


4 


SBIO 242 


BIO 216 


4 


ELECTIVE 


BIO 210 


4 


ELECTIVE 


BIO 225 


4 


Chemistry 






SCHM 101 


CHM106 


4 


SCHM 105+107L 


CHM 107 


4 


or106+107L 






SCHM 111 


CHM110 


4 


SCHM 112 


CHM 111 


4 


ELECTIVE 


CHM 211 


4 


ELECTIVE 


CHM 212 


4 


ELECTIVE 


CHM 227 


4 



use Upstate 


Tech Colleges 


Semester Hour 


Computer Science 






SCSC 138 


CRT 101 


3 


ELECTIVE 


OPT 237 


3 


SCSC 234 


CRT 206 or 286 


3 


SCSC 239 


CRT 206 or 286 


3 


Criminal Justice 






SCRJ 101 


CRJ 101 


3 


ELECTIVE 


CRJ 115 


3 


ELECTIVE 


CRJ 125 


3 


ELECTIVE 


CRJ 210 


3 


ELECTIVE 


CRJ 224 


3 


ELECTIVE 


CRJ 236 


3 


ELECTIVE 


CRJ 242 


3 


ELECTIVE 


CRJ 244 


3 


ELECTIVE 


CRJ 247 


3 


Economics 






SECO 221 


ECO 210 


3 


SECO 222 


ECO 211 


3 


SECO 291 


MAT 120 


3 


SECO 292 


MAT 220 


3 


ELECTIVE 


ECO 201 


3 


ELECTIVE 


ECO 205 


3 


English 






SEGL101 


ENG 101 


3 


SEGL102 


ENG 102 


3 


SEGL279 


ENG 201 


3 


SEGL 279 


ENG 202 


3 


ELECTIVE 


ENG 203 


3 


SEGL 289 


ENG 205 


3 


SEGL 289 


ENG 206 


3 


SEGL 275 


ENG 208 


3 


SEGL 275 


ENG 209 


3 


ELECTIVE 


ENG 214 


3 


ELECTIVE 


ENG 218 


3 


ELECTIVE 


ENG 222 


3 


ELECTIVE 


ENG 228 


3 


ELECTIVE 


ENG 230 


3 


SEGL 291 


ENG 234 


3 


ELECTIVE 


ENG 236 


3 


SEGL 208 


ENG 238 


3 


ELECTIVE 


ENG 260 


3 


French 






SFRN 101 


FRE101 


3 


SFRN 102 


FRE102 


3 


SFRN 201 


FRE201 


3 


SFRN 202 


FRE 202 


3 


Geoaraphy 






SGEG 103 


GEO 101 


3 


ELECTIVE 


GEO 102 


3 


ELECTIVE 


GEO 260 


3 


German 






SGRM 101 


GER 101 


3 


SGRM 102 


GER102 


3 

continued 



Admissions 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



23 



use Upstate Tech Colleges Semester Hours 

Government and International Studies (Political Science) 
SGIS201 PSC201 3 

ELECTIVE PSC 205 3 

ELECTIVE PSC 215 3 

ELECTIVE PSC 220 3 



History 
ELECTIVE 


HIS 101 


3 


SHST111 


HIS 102 


3 


ELECTIVE 


HIS 106 


3 


SHST112 


HIS 112 


3 


ELECTIVE 


HIS 115 


3 


ELECTIVE 


HIS 201 


3 


ELECTIVE 


HIS 202 


3 


IDS 
ELECTIVE 


IDS 101 


3 


Journalism 






ELECTIVE 


JOU 101 


3 


Logic (See Philosophy) 




Mathematics 






SMTH102 


MAT 120 


3 


SMTH120 


MAT 109 


3 


SMTH121 


MAT 109 


3 


SMTH 120 


MAT 110 


3 


SMTH 121 


MAT 110 


3 


SMTH 126 


MAT 110 


3 


SMTH 127 


MAT 111 


3 


SMTH 126+127 


MAT 112 


3 


SPSY 225 


MAT 220 


3 


SSOC 201 


MAT 120 


3 


SECO 291 


MAT 120 


3 


SECO 292 


MAT 220 


3 


SMTH 122 


MAT 130 


3 


SMTH 174 


MAT 132 


3 


SMTH 143+144 


MAT 140+141 


12 


+243+244 


+240 




SMTH 202 


MAT 220 


3 


SMTH 141 


MAT 140 


4 


SMTH 142 


MAT 141 


4 


SMTH 231 


MAT 211 


3 


SMTH 232 


MAT 212 


3 


SMTH 233 


MAT 215 


3 


SMTH 241 


MAT 240 


3 


SMTH 245 


MAT 242 


3 


ELECTIVE 


MAT 122 


3 


SMTH 120 


MAT 123 




ELECTIVE 


MAT 230 


3 


Music 






SMUS110 


MUS 105 


3 


Philosophy (Loqic) 
SPHL102 


PH1 101 


3 


SLGC 207 


PH1 105 


3 


ELECTIVE 


PH1 108 


3 



use Upstate Tech Colleges 

Philosophy (Logic) continued 

ELECTIVE PH1 110 

ELECTIVE PH1 115 

ELECTIVE PHI 201 

Physical Science 
SPHS101+101L 



Semester Hours 

3 
3 
3 



PHS101 



Physics 
SPHS201 


PHY 201 


4 


SPHS 202 


PHY 202 


4 


SPHS211 


PHY 221 


4 


SPHS 212 


PHY 222 


4 


Political Science 






(See Government and International Sti 


Lidie 


Psychology 
SPSY 225 


MAT 220 


3 


ELECTIVE 


PSY115 


3 


SPSY 101 


PSY 201 


3 


SPSY 302 


PSY 203 


3 


ELECTIVE 


PSY 208 


3 


ELECTIVE 


PSY 212 


3 


Religion 
ELECTIVE 


REL101 


3 


SREL103 


REL201 


3 


Sociology 
SSOC 101 


SOC 101 


3 


SOC 201 


MAT 120 




SSOC 206 


SOC 206 


3 


SSOC 210 


SOC 210 


3 


SSOC 235 


SOC 235 


3 


ELECTIVE 


SOC 151 


3 


ELECTIVE 


SOC 205 


3 


ELECTIVE 


SOC 220 


3 


ELECTIVE 


SOC 235 


3 


Spanish 
SSPN 101 


SPA 101 


3 


SSPN 102 


SPA 102 


3 


SSPN 101 


SPA 105 


3 


SSPN 201 


SPA 201 


3 


SSPN 202 


SPA 202 


3 


Speech 
SSPH 201 


SPC 205 


3 


ELECTIVE 


SPC 208 


3 


ELECTIVE 


SPC 209 


3 


ELECTIVE 


SPC 210 


3 


ELECTIVE 


SPC 200 


3 


Theatre 






STHE 161 


THE 101 


3 


STHE 170 


THE 105 


3 


STHE 260 


THE 220 & 221 


1 


ELECTIVE 


HSS101 


3 



'transfer courses are subject to change without notification. 



"Sole: Some elective courses will transfer to meet general education 
requirements. Please contact Admissions with any quesiiDin 



24 



/\dmissions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 




Financial Aid 



Purpose and Eligibility 

use Upstate ofters a full range of financial assistance 
programs designed to assist students and their families with 
the cost of education. These programs provide financial 
aid resources in the form of grants, scholarships, loans and 
employment opportunities. These resources are awarded 
to students based on financial need, academic promise, 
leadership potential, special talents, or a combination of 
these criteria. Descriptions of these programs and their 
requirements may be found in the following pages of this 
catalog. In 2007-08, more than $40 million in financial 
aid was awarded to USC Upstate students. 

Eligibility for assistance based on financial need is 
determined by completing a federally approved needs 
analysis form or Free Application for Federal Student Aid 
(FAFSA). Students may complete the FAFSA electroni- 
cally at www.fafsa.ed.gov . The Title IV code for USC 
Upstate is 00695 1 . The FAFSA calculates how much the 
family should reasonably contribute toward the cost of 
college from current income and resources. The difference 
between what the family can contribute and the cost of 
education is the student 'sfinancial need. USC Upstate seeks 
to identify and provide funds to meet the financial needs 
of its students. To the extent resources are available, it is 
intended that no student be denied an education because 
of financial need. 

Financial assistance programs have individual require- 
ments in addition to a demonstration of financial need 
through completion of the FAFSA. These requirements 
generally include, but are not limited to, enrollment in 
good standing in a program of study leading to a degree 
or teaching certificate, enrollment in a minimum number 
of hours each semester, and maintenance of satisfactory 
academic progress. Students receiving state, federal or 
institutional financial aid must be enrolled in 12 or more 
USC Upstate hours to be considered ftill-time forfinancial 
aid purposes. 



Satisfactory Academic Progress 

Institutions participating in Title IV federal financial 
aid programs are required by the U.S. Department of 
Education to establish institutional policies that define 
satisfactory academic progress. All students who receive 
federal or institutional financial assistance at USC Upstate 
are expected to maintain satisfactory progress toward 
completion of their programs of study in a reasonable 
period of time. Financial assistance programs covered 
by this policy include all federal financial aid programs 
(Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational 
Opportunity Grant, Federal Academic Competitiveness 
Grant, National SMART Grant, Federal Subsidized and 
Unsubsidized Stafford Loans, Federal Perkins Loans, Fed- 
eral Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students, and Federal 
Work-Study), South Carolina Teacher Loans, State Need 
Based Grant and institutional financial assistance programs 
(athletic grants and minority incentive grants). 

The following policy has been approved by the USC 
Upstate Financial Aid Committee. Students are considered 
to be making satisfactory academic progress if they: 



1 . are admitted and enrolled as degree-seeking or 
teacher certification students; 

2. meet the university standards for continued en- 
rollment as specified in the "Academic Standing" 
section of this catalog; 

3. complete requirements for a degree or certificate 
within a reasonable length of time as specified 
below and on the following page: 

a. The total number of semesters of full-time 
enrollment (12 or more semester hours at- 
tempted) at any post-secondary institution 
does not exceed 1 2 semesters for a four-year 
degree; 

b. The total number of semesters of part-time 
enrollment (fewer than 12 semester hours 
attempted) does not exceed the equivalent 
of 12 full-time semesters for a four-year 
degree. 

4. earn no fewer than the following specified hours 
of undergraduate semester hours per academic 
year (includes fall, spring and summer terms). 
Classification as full-time, three-quarter-time or 
half-time is determined at the end of the 100% 
refund period each semester, which is the last 
day of registration. Therefore, withdrawing 
from courses at any time after the last day of 
registration and not earning the required num- 
ber of hours fails to meet satisfactory academic 
progress requirements. The State Need Based 
Grant Program requires these hours to be earned 
during fall and spring semesters. Note: You are 
allowed up to six hours of probation if you do 
not meet the following requirements: 

Full-time student ( 12 or more hours attempted a 

semester) 

1 St year 24 hours per academic year 

2nd year 24 hours per academic year 

or 48 hours total 
3rd year 24 hours per academic year 

or 72 hours total 
4th year 24 hours per academic year 

or 96 hours total 
5th year 24 hours per academic year 

or 120 hours total 

Three-quarter-time student (9-11 hours attempted a 
semester) 

1 st year 

2nd year 



3rd year 
4th year 
5th year 
6th year 
7th year 



1 8 hours per academ 
1 8 hours per academ 
or 36 hours total 
1 8 hours per academ 
or 54 hours total 
1 8 hours per academ 
or 72 hours total 
1 8 hours per academ 
or 90 hours total 
1 8 hours per academ 
or 108 hours total 
1 8 hours per academ 
or 120 hours total 



ic year 
ic year 



ic year 
ic year 
ic year 
ic year 
ic year 



26 



Financial Aid 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Half-time student (6-8 hours attempted a semester) 
1 St year 1 2 hours per academic year 
2nd year 1 2 hours per academic year 

or 24 hours total 
3rd year 12 hours per academic year 

or 36 hours total 
4th year 12 hours per academic year 

or 48 hours total 
5th year 12 hours per academic year 

or 60 hours total 
6th year 12 hours per academic year 

or 72 hours total 
7th year 1 2 hours per academic year 

or 84 hours total 
8th year 1 2 hours per academic year 

or 96 hours total 
9th year 12 hours per academic year 

or 108 hours cumulative 
1 0th year 1 2 hours per academic year 

or 120 hours total 



Note: Hours that are transferred in from another school(s) 
must be calculated to determine the quantitative element 
of academic progress. 

Second Degree or Certification Students 

Students seeking a second degree or teacher certifica- 
tion with an undergraduate degree are required to appeal. 
The student must explain why a second degree or career 
change is required, be accepted by the school or division 
to which the student is applying, and have an anticipated 
graduation date determined by the faculty advisor. If the 
student's plan is deemed reasonable and all documentation 
is provided, an extension of eligibility will be granted for 
a maximum of four full-time equivalency semesters or 
anticipated graduation date. 

Academic Suspension 

Students readmitted following a suspension will be 
eligible for financial aid if they meet all other aid eligibil- 
ity requirements. These students must earn a 2.0 grade 
point average on the first 12 hours attempted following 
readmission to maintain further financial aid eligibility. 
Following completion of these 12 hours, subsequent 
financial aid eligibility will be determined by conditions 
2, 3 (a and b) and 4 described previously. 

Students serving suspensions will not be eligible for 
financial aid during periods of open enrollment. Students 
not making satisfactory academic progress are not eligible 
for financial aid. 

Appeal Process 

If a student's ability to meet these standards was 
affected by extenuating circumstances, he or she may 
appeal this determination. Information concerning the 
appeals process is available in the Office of Financial Aid 
and Scholarships. Students not meeting these standards 
at the end of spring term may attend summer school to 
make up deficit hours or improve the cumulative grade 
point average. Incomplete appeals will be returned upon 
receipt. The committee's decision is final and cannot be 
further challenged. 



Grants 

Federal Pell Grants are designed to be the foundation 
of financial aid. Their purpose is to ensure that all eligible 
students have at least some of the money needed to continue 
their education after high school. The amount of a Federal 
Pell Grant award depends on a student's financial need, 
the cost of the student's education, and the amount of time 
the student is enrolled during the school year. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grants are awarded to a very limited number of students 
with the greatest financial need. The grants are restricted 
due to the shortage of appropriated federal fiinds, with 
preference to Federal Pell Grant recipients. 

Federal Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) 
and National SMART Grant. The Academic Competi- 
tiveness Grant and the National SMART Grant were created 
by the "Higher Education Reconciliation Act of 2005." 
These grants are available to fijU-time students receiving 
a Pell Grant who meet all eligibility requirements. Grants 
for first and second year students are called Academic 
Competitiveness Grants (ACG), while grants for third 
and fourth year students are called National Science and 
Mathematics Access to Retain Talent (SMART) Grants. 

Loans 

Campus-based Loans 

Federal Perkins Loans permit students to borrow 
money from the federal government through the Univer- 
sity on a need basis. Repayment and interest begin nine 
months after graduation, leaving school, or dropping 
below half-time enrollment. The interest rate is 5 percent 
per year and repayment may be extended over a period 
of 10 years. 

Federal Family Education Loan Program 
(FFELP) 

Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan Program is a 

need-based program that allows students to borrow for 
educational expenses. Interest rates for borrowers are 
fixed at 6.0 with no outstanding FFELP loans. The federal 
government pays the interest on these loans as long as 
students are enrolled on at least a half-time basis. Lenders 
may charge an origination fee and insurance fees not to 
exceed 4 percent, which are deducted irom the approved 
amount of the loan. 

Loan eligibility is based on financial need, class stand- 
ing, and anticipated graduation date. Freshman students 
may borrow up to $5,500 annually ($3,500 subsidized, 
$2,000 unsubsidized). Students with sophomore class 
standing may borrow up to $6,500 annually ($4,500 
subsidized, $2,000 unsubsidized) and those classified as 
juniors and seniors may borrow up to $7,500 annually 
($5,500 subsidized, $2,000 unsubsidized). 

Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan Program 

is available for students who do not qualify, in whole or 
in part, for the Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan. The 
terms for this loan are the same as those described for 



Financial Aid 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



27 



the Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan Program with the 
following exceptions. 

1. The annual loan limits for dependent, under- 
graduate students are the same as those for the 
Subsidized Stafford Loan. The annual loan limits 
for independent, undergraduate students are as 
follows (subsidized and unsubsidized): $9,500 
for students who have not completed the first 
30 hours of an undergraduate degree, $10,500 
for students with sophomore class standing, and 
those students classified as juniors and seniors 
may borrow up to $12,500 annually. 

2. The federal government does not pay interest on 
behalf of the student while enrolled in school. 
Students must pay all interest on the loan monthly 
or quarterly. Lenders may agree to add interest to 
the principal of the loan with repayment begin- 
ning after the student ceases to be enrolled on at 
least a half-time basis. 

Federal Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students 
(PLUS) allow parents to borrow up to the cost of education 
less other aid received each year without regard to income. 
A credit check is required of all parent borrowers. Repay- 
ment of principal and interest begins within 60 days after 
the final loan disbursement. The variable interest rate from 
July 1 . 2006- June 30, 2007, is 8.5 percent. The rate will be 
determined by the U.S. Secretary of Education according 
to the formula prescribed by Congress. Parents will pay 
an origination fee of three percent and an insurance fee 
which may not exceed one percent of the approved amount 
of the loan. These fees will be deducted proportionately 
from each disbursement made. 

Alternate Sources of Assistance 

The HOPE Scholarship Tax Credit and Lifetime 
Learning Tax Credit was created from the Taxpayer 
Relief Act of 1 997 to assist families to offset tuition costs. 
These are non-refundable tax credits, not scholarships, 
which reduce the amount of federal income tax families 
must pay. Families who will benefit are middle-and lower- 
middle-income families who do not receive enough gift 
aid to cover tuition payments. 

The HOPE tax credit is valued at up to $1,500 per 
tax year, per child, for the first two years of undergraduate 
study. The Lifetime Learning tax credit is valued at up to 
SI. 000 per year, per family, for an unlimited number of 
years. The credit varies according to family income, tuition 
costs and the amount of gift assistance received. 

To be eligible, a taxpayer must file a tax return, must 
owe taxes and must claim the student as an exemption 
(self, spouse or dependent). Additionally, married filers 
must file jointly. The tax credit is phased out completely 
for single tax filers with adjusted gross incomes of more 
than $50,000 and more than $ 1 00,000 for joint filers. You 
may access www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/PPI/HOPE/index. 
html for complete information. Tax filers should consult 
their tax advisor for details. 

The Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 provides other 
educationally related federal incentives including tax-free 
Educational IRAs, penalty-free withdrawing from IRAs 



and 40 1 (k)s, and excludable contributions to prepaid tuition 
plans. Families are strongly advised to consult their tax 
advisor about these options. 

State Financial Aid Programs 

Legislative Incentives for Future Excellence (LIFE) 
Scholarships* is a renewable $5,000 scholarship for 
residents of South Carolina who are enrolled full time 
and seeking a first baccalaureate degree. Students must 
meet state residency requirements upon initial college 
enrollment. There is no scholarship application for the 
LIFE scholarship. The award is granted by the Office of 
Financial Aid based on data provided by the Office of 
Admissions and the Office of the Registrar. 

Students must meet two of the following three 

criteria to qualify: 

• earn a 3.0 GPA on a uniform grading scale 

• score a minimum of 1 100 SAT or 24 ACT 

• rank in the top 30 percent of their 
graduating class 

To retain the scholarship, recipients must have 
completed: 

• first year students complete at least 30 hours and 
earn a minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA 

• second year students complete at least 60 hours 
and earn a minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA 

• third year students complete at least 90 hours 
and earn a minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA 

NOTE: remedial work is not counted in the 
hours earned or the GPA 

Additionally, students must sign an affidavit certifying 
that they have not been adjudicated delinquent, convicted 
or pled guilty or nolo contendere to any felonies, or to any 
alcohol or drug-related offenses. Recipients must certify 
they are not default in any federal or stated educational 
loans and they do not owe an overpayment on any federal 
or state grants. 

Certain majors may qualify up to $7500. Go to the 
financial aid page of the USC Upstate Web site for more 
infonnation. 

For complete information, you may access the Com- 
mission on Higher Education at www.che.sc.gov . 

S.C. Hope Scholarship* offers a nonrenewable 
$2,800 scholarship for entering freshman that achieve 
academically, but are not eligible to received the LIFE 
Scholarship. Residency requirements and other restrictions 
are similar to the LIFE Scholarship, except eligibility is 
based solely on the grade point average. 

Entering freshmen must have: 

• earn a 3.0 GPA on a uniform grading scale upon 
high school graduation. 

Recipients who complete a minimum of 30 hours 
their freshman year and earn a minimum cumulative 3.0 
GPA may be eligible for the LIFE Scholarship the fol- 
lowing year. 

Palmetto Fellows and LIFE recipients are not eligible 
for the HOPE scholarship. 

Palmetto Fellows Scholarship* offers up to $6,700 
in renewable scholarship assistance to outstanding fresh- 
man who are residents of South Carolina. 



28 



Financial Aid 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Applicants must meet the following criteria: 

• earn a 3.5 GPA on a uniform grading scale 

• score a minimum of 1200 SAT or 27 ACT 

• rank in the top 6 percent of their junior class OR 

• earn a 4.0 GPA on a unifonn grading scale 

• score a minimum of 1400 SAT or 32 ACT 
Students should contact their high school guidance 

counselor for application procedures. Recipients must 
complete a minimum of 30 credit hours each academic 
year and must earn a minimum 3.0 GPA for renewal of 
this award. 

Recipients must certify that they have not been 
adjudicated delinquent, convicted or pled guilty or nolo 
contendere to any felonies, or to any alcohol or drug-re- 
lated offenses. NOTE: remedial work is not counted in 
the hours earned or the GPA. 

Certain majors may qualify up to $10,000. Go to the 
financial aid page of the USC Upstate Web site for more 
information. 

For complete information, you may access the Com- 
mission on Higher Education at www.che.sc.gov. 

South Carolina Income Tax Credit for College 
Tuition allows South Carolina residents to claim a re- 
fundable tax credit of up to $850 per student. Students 
must complete 15 credit hours each semester and may 
not receive the LIFE, Palmetto Fellow or any other state 
scholarship. The credit is available to offset out-of-pocket 
tuition payments only. Instructions are included in the 
2005 S.C. income tax return. 

Future Scholar 529 College Savings Plans allows 
families to save for college through a state-sponsored plan 
created under Section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code. 
These plans offer special tax benefits and have no income 
or age restrictions. Accounts can be used at almost any 
accredited school to pay for tuition, room, board, books 
and computers. For more information, call 1-888-244- 
5674 or visit www.futurescholar.com. 

South Carolina Tuition Prepayment Program al- 
lows families to purchase an advance payment contract 
for tuition at a guaranteed level that can be used at public 
and accredited private colleges and universities. The 
program allows for federal tax deferral on contributions 
in accordance with IRS rulings. For more information, 
call 1-888-7SC-GRAD or visit www.scgrad.org . 

S.C. State Need Based Grant* is designed for South 
Carolina residents who are enrolled full time seeking their 
first baccalaureate degree and have demonstrated finan- 
cial aid. Students must complete the FAFSA annually to 
apply. Priority is given to those students whose files are 
complete by the March 1 priority deadline. Students must 
certify that they have not been adjudicated delinquent, 
convicted or pled guilty or nolo contendere to any felonies 
or to any alcohol or drug-related offenses. Continuing 
students must complete a minimum of 24 credit hours 
per academic year, excluding summer school, and earn a 
minimum cumulative 2.0 GPA. Students may not receive 
the grant for more than eight semesters. For complete 
information, you may access the Commission on Higher 



Education at www.che.sc.gov. 

S. C. Teacher Loan Program was established to 
provide loan assistance to qualified students in education. 
This may be cancelled at a rate of 20 percent or $3,000 
whichever is greater for each full year of teaching in either 
an eligible critical subject area or a critical geographic area 
in South Carolina. Teaching in both types of critical areas 
increases the cancellation benefit to 33 percent or $5,000. 
Available to only South Carol ina residents, this program is 
based on minimum academic expectations. Freshmen and 
sophomores may borrow $5,000 per year. Students who 
qualify as "career changers" may borrow up to $15,000 
per year. Applicants should submit the S.C. Teachers Loan 
Application by April 1. Fund are limited with renewal 
applicants given priority. Additional information, includ- 
ing academic criteria and critical areas/critical subjects, is 
available from the S.C. Student Loan Corporation website 
at www.scstudentloan.org. 

Teaching Fellows Program — In 1999, the S.C. 
General Assembly, recognizing the shortage of teachers in 
our state, funded the Teaching Fellows Program for South 
Carolina. The mission of the South Carolina Teaching 
Fellows Program is to recruit talented high school seniors 
into the teaching profession and to help them develop 
leadership qualities. Each year, the program provides 
Fellowships for up to 200 high school seniors who have 
exhibited high academic achievement, a history of service 
to the school and community, and a desire to teach South 
Carolina's children. 

The scholarship provides up to $5,700 for tuition 
and board and $300 for summer enrichment programs 
(contingent on funding from the S.C. General Assembly) 
administered by the Center for Eductor Recruitment, 
Retention, and Advancement (CERRA). A Fellow agrees 
to teach in South Carolina one year for every year he/she 
received the Fellowship. 

Applications are available from high school guidance 
counselors, teachers, counselors, teacher cadet teachers, 
and the CERRA, and may be downloaded from the CERRA 
website at www.cerra.org . 

*Changes mayoccur for these programs. Access the Commis- 
sion on Higher Education website at H'ww.che.sc.g ov for the latest 
information available. Awards are contingent upon fund availability 
to be appropriated by the South Carolina legislature. 

Work Opportunities 

Job opportunities are available to USC Upstate 
students through a variety of programs: Federal Work- 
Study, Community Services Program, Job Location and 
Development Program, and the Student Assistant Program. 
The primary purpose of these programs is to provide a 
financial resource to students for educational expenses; 
however, these jobs may also provide valuable work 
experience. USC Upstate students work in a variety of 
jobs on and off campus. The pay scale is determined by 
the specific job description and the skills or experience 
of the student being hired. Students employed on campus 
are generally limited to working no more than 20 hours 
each week during periods of regular enrollment. 



Financial Aid 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



29 



Other Aid 

VETERANS' AND DEPENDENTS' BENEFITS. 

Educational benefits are available to qualified veterans 
and children of deceased and disabled veterans. Inqui- 
ries should be made to the veterans" affairs office in the 
student's home county seat and the USC Upstate Office 
of Records and Registration. 

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION. This award is to 
conserve the working usefulness of persons with impair- 
ments who have reasonable expectations of becoming 
employed. Students who might qualify for vocational 
rehabilitation assistance should contact the Office of Vo- 
cational Rehabilitation in their home county seats. 

Out-of-State Fee Waivers 

Students who are not residents of South Carolina and 
who receive USC Upstate Athletic or Foundation Scholar- 
ships, or USC Upstate Undergraduate Assistantships valued 
at $250 or more each semester may qualify for a waiver for 
out-of-state fees. The following conditions must be met to 
qualify for the fee waiver. 

The award must be made in writing to the student before 
the end of late registration for each semester and prior to 
the student paying his tuition. 

Notification of the award must be forwarded to the 



financial aid office prior to the end of late registration for 
each semester. Scholarships or undergraduate assistantships 
that are awarded after the end of late registration for each 
semester will not result in a refund of out-of-state fees. 

Undergraduate Assistantships 

Undergraduate assistantships are designed to attract 
students in areas such as publications, music, drama, debate 
and selected leadership positions. Eligible students may 
receive financial assistance ranging from $250 to the cost 
of tuition and books each semester based upon the activ- 
ity, level of responsibility, and expected workload. Each 
recipient is required to sign a contract, which describes the 
position and its responsibilities. Assistantships are avail- 
able for participation in the Gordon-Colloms Gospel Choir, 
University Singers, Shoestring Players (theater group). 
The Carolinian (newspaper). Debate Team, Writer's Inc. 
(literary magazine), USC Upstate Dance Team, Campus 
Activities Board and Student Government Association. 
Many of these assistantships require prior involvement 
in the activity or organizations. Please contact the Divi- 
sion of Student AtTairs at 864-503-5106 for additional 
information. 



Scholarships 



use Upstate strongly supports the recognition of students who possess the potential to return the benefits of a qualify 
university education to our society. Scholarships are awarded to students based on demonstrated academic abilify, career 
plans, educational goals and community service. 



USC Upstate Scholars Program 

The USC Upstate Scholars Program for new and continuing students assists academically talented individuals in their pursuit 
of higher education. The prestigious awards are given to students who have shown their potential through academic merit. USC 
Upstate and the Upstate region will benefit from the leadership and academic excellence these scholars bring to campus. Scholar- 
ships will be awarded to eligible students; however, the number of awards available will be determined by the University. Early 
application for admission to USC Upstate is encouraged for students to be considered for new student scholarships. Contact the 
Office of Admissions for more information. 

CHANCELLOR SCHOLARSHIPS are awards of $7,500 (for boarding students) and $3,500 (for commuting students) given 
annually to entering freshmen who meet the following criteria: present a minimum SAT score of 1 ,300 or ACT score of 29, rank 
in the top 10% of their high school class and have a minimum cumulative GPAof 3.75. 

VALEDICTORIAN SCHOLARSHIPS are awards of $7,500 (for boarding students) and $3,500 (for commuting students) 
given annually to entering freshmen who are ranked first in their class at time of admission to the University or upon high school 
graduation. In addition. Valedictorian Scholars must present a minimum SAT score of 1 , 1 00 or ACT score of 24. 

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS are $2,500 scholarships that are awarded annually to entering freshmen who meet the fol- 
lowing criteria: high school graduate, present a minimum SAT score of 1,200 or ACT score of 27, rank in top 10% of their high 
school class with a minimum GPA of 3.50. 

METROPOLITAN SCHOLARSHIPS are $1,500 scholarships that are awarded annually to entering freshmen who meet the 
following criteria: present a minimum SAT score of 1,100 or ACT score of 24, rank in top 10% of their high school class and 
have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25. 



30 



Financial Aid 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



TRANSFER SCHOLARSHIPS are $2,000 scholarships that are awarded annually to entering transfer students (coming from 
two-year or technical colleges) who have earned at least 60 semester hours of transferable credit or have earned Associate of 
Arts or Science degrees from an accredited two-year college. Candidates must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.50. This 
scholarship is available to the recipient for two academic years (four semesters — fall and spring, not summer). 

NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS are annual awards through the National Merit Scholarship Program. The competition 
for these awards begins when the students take the PS AT/NMSQT in their junior year of high school. Students eligible to continue 
in the National Merit competition are contacted by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. At USC Upstate, Merit Scholar- 
ships are $500 annually and are renewable for four years of undergraduate sUidy if the student maintains at least a 3.0 cumulative 
GPA. Students receiving other general USC Upstate scholarships may also receive a Merit Scholarship; the total general USC 
Upstate scholarship package for such students, however, may not exceed the resident, on-campus, cost-of-attendance figure. To 
be eligible, students must be accepted by USC Upstate, be designated a National Merit finalist, and have listed USC Upstate as 
their first choice on the National Merit application 

RENEWAL POLICY: Chancellor. Valedictorian. Metropolitan and University: scholarships are renewable for seven additional 
consecutive semesters providing the student maintains a cumulative USC Upstate GPA of 3.0 and earns a minimum 24 USC 
Upstate semester hours during the fall and spring semesters. Transfer scholarships are renewable for three additional consecu- 
tive semesters providing the student maintains a cumulative USC Upstate GPA of 3.0 and earns a minimum of 24 USC Upstate 
semester hours during the fall and spring semesters. 



Foundation Scholars Program 

Funded and endowed scholarships are awarded annually to qualified students. Students may obtain applications from the 
financial aid office or from the USC Upstate web site after December 1 each year. The application deadline is February 1 
unless otherwise indicated in the scholarship definition. 

The USC UPSTATE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP was established by the Alumni Association and is given 
to the child of a USC Upstate Alumnus. The recipient must be a rising senior, South Carolina resident, have a cumulative GPA 
of 3.0, and have completed the FASFA form. 

The 3M SCHOLAR NURSING SCHOLARSHIP awards $1000 to a student in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree 
Program with a 3.0 GPA or higher. The recipient will be identified as a "3M Scholar" and invited to visit the 3M Greenville 
site. 

The EB AND MAGGIE BARNES MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP provides an annual award in memory of Dr. James "Eb" 
Barnes and his wife, Maggie Barnes to a USC Upstate student completing a degree at the University Center of Greenville. The 
award is given to a student who most closely meets the criteria of a non-traditional student, enrolled in a degree-completion 
program at UCG at least half-time, with established financial need. The award is given at an annual reception in honor of the 
recipient and the family of Eb and Maggie Barnes. 

The BANNON SCHOLARSHIP is sponsored by the Bannon Foundation. The recipient must have genuine financial need, 
be a resident of South Carolina (residents living near Greenville or Spartanburg will be given preference), be of sound moral 
character, and be active in volunteer work. The recipient should be a student who qualified for but did not receive one of the 
USC Upstate Scholars Program award. 

MARY BLACK SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOLARSHIPS are awards of $500 made to full-time sophomores seeking the 
associate degree in technical nursing who have financial need, have a record of service to the University and community, have 
a 3.0 cumulative GPA in nursing courses and have a 2.5 cumulative GPA in all other courses. Another award of $500 is made 
to a senior (as of fall semester) seeking the Bachelor of Science in Nursing who has financial need, has a record of service to 
the University and community, has a 3.0 cumulative GPA, and has a 3.0 cumulative GPA in all nursing courses. 

BUDWEISER OF THE CAROLINAS MINORITY SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to a South Carolina resident minority 
student admitted into the upper division of the business-marketing program. The scholarship is valued at $1,000 and is to be 
used toward tuition costs. It may be renewable provided a cumulative USC Upstate 2.25 GPA is maintained. An internship 
with Budweiser of Spartanburg is also available. 

The EILEEN K. BURTON SCHOLARSHIP was established by Cafe Enterprises, Inc. to honor the late Mrs. Burton, a 1 980 
graduate of the University. The $1,000 scholarship is awarded annually to a student in a business-related major whose past 
education was interrupted by full-time employment, military service or family responsibilities. Preference is given to students 
demonstrating a high degree of integrity, character, leadership ability and a strong work ethic. 

Financial Aid 31 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



The GATES CHANCELLOR'S SCHOLAR ENDOWMENT FUND was established by Mr. and Mrs. MacFarland Gates. 
The scholarship annually funds a Chancellor's Scholar award within the USC Upstate Scholars Program. 

The GOINGBACK AND MARY ULMER CHILTOSKEY SCHOLARSHIP was established to memorialize the role 
that Goingback and Mary Ulmer Chiltoskey played as eminent members of the Cherokee Nation. This $500 award will be 
given to a member of the Native American Community with preference given to an enrolled member of the Eastern Band of 
Cherokee Indians who is an incoming freshman with a high school cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 and a minimum SAT score 
of 900. Federal financial need is required (must file Free Application for Federal Student Aid.) 

The CLARY/DRUCKER ACCOUNTING SCHOLARSHIP established in honor of Diana Clary and Meyer Drucker. retired 
faculty members, for having made a positive impact in the USC Upstate accounting program and the Upstate community. The 
$600 award is intended to assist a current student who is an accounting major, a rising senior, has a USC Upstate cumulative 
GPA of 3.0 or higher, and is a South Carolina resident. 

The COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to the junior with the highest GPA (at least 30 
credit hours must have been earned at USC Upstate). The recipient must be a fiilltime student with a major in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. 

The COMMUNITY SOUTH BANK SCHOLARSHIP is awarded annually - $1,000. to a fulltime Business Major that 
wants to pursue a career in banking. Student must also be a rising junior with 60 hours of credit with a minimum GPA of 3.0, 
and demonstrate financial need as defined by the U.S. Department of Education. 

DAVID B. DEDMON, DMD SCHOLARSHIP is established through an endowment created by Dr. David B. Dedmon to 
enable financially needy students to continue preparation in the health sciences area. The award is given to a student who most 
closely meets the criteria of enrolled in a pre-professional health science curriculum (other than nursing), have completed 
32 hours in science and have junior status by the end of the semester of application, enrolled full time at USC Upstate, dem- 
onstrated financial need, have a proven desire to serve their community, 3.0 cumulative GPA to qualify and a 3.0 cumulative 
GPA to renew. 

The JOHN EDMUNDS SCHOLARSHIP honors Dr. John B. Edmunds, Jr. This annual award will be given to a student 
with at least junior standing, who has a minimum GPA of 3.5, is a resident of the Upstate of South Carolina, has a declared 
major in the Social and Behavioral Sciences at USC Upstate, and who plans to pursue graduate studies in a SSPH discipline 
(includes law and medicine). A 1,500 word essay is also required. 

The SCHOOL OF EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP is an annual award to a student who has been admitted to the professional 
program of the School of Education; and who has demonstrated financial need, academic excellence and altruistic goals. 

The TED EILENBERG SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to a student enrolled in a degree program in the Johnson College ofBusiness 
and Economics. The recipient must be a junior or senior, have financial need, and have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5. 

The CATHERINE ERVIN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT was established by the family and friends of 
Cathy Er\in Overstreet, a graduate of USC Upstate. The proceeds from the endowment will be awarded to a student in the 
Mary Black School of Nursing, with preference given to a graduate of Broome High School in Spartanburg County School 
District Three and/or a student receiving limited funding form other grants and scholarships. 

FEATHERSTON FAMILY ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP was established to provide financial assistance to a part-time 
or fiill-time student that does not qualify for any state merit based scholarships. The award is given to a student, who most 
closely meets the criteria of an arts and science major, not eligible for any state merit based scholarship, and has completed 
the FAFSA form. 

The FIDELIS ALPHA CHAPTER OF ALPHA DELTA KAPPA provides financial assistance to a full-time education 
major that does not qualify for any state merit based scholarships. Student must also demonstrate financial need (as defined 
by U.S. Department of Education), be a rising senior with 90 or more credit hours, and be a South Carolina resident with a 
GPA of3.0 or higher. 

The GAMMA BETA PHI SCHOLARSHIP is an award of $500 to a full-time student 23 years of age or older with a 3.5 
cumulative GPA in at least 1 2 hours at USC Upstate. 

The JAMES B. GREER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP is an award to a senior 23 year of age or older whose past educa- 
tion was interrupted by full-time employment, military service, or family responsibilities for a minimum of two years. Criteria 
include a 2.0 cumulative GPA and contributions to USC Upstate through service to student government, publications or the 
student affairs office. 

32 Financial Aid 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



The EARL GORDON SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENTS are awards of varying amounts to sophomores and juniors who 
have a 2.0 cumulative GPA, service or involvement in school or community, and financial need. 

The DORIS HANELINE NURSING SCHOLARSHIP is an award of $200 to a nursing sUident who is married with chil- 
dren and who is pursuing a second career. Other criteria include financial need and academic ability (3.0 cumulative GPA for 
continuing students). Preference is given to a student intending to work two years in Spartanburg County. 

JAMES B. GREER SERVICE ENDOWMENT provides $500 financial assistance to a non-traditional student who is active 
in campus organizations. The recipient must be at least 23 years old. a full-time student with a minimum 30 credit hours and 
2.0 GPA, financial need, and recommended by the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs and/or Dean of Students. 

JLH CONSULTING, LLC NURSING FUNDED SCHOLARSHIP is a S 1 ,000 award given to a ftill-time student enrolled 
in the USC Upstate Mary Black School of Nursing. Student must be recommended for the award by the Dean of the School 
of Nursing and have demonstrated financial need. 

The DOC LINDSAY SCHOLARSHIP provides an award to a non-traditional student in the memory of former USC Upstate 
Professor of Fine Arts and Humanities. Dr. Bryan E. "Doc" Lindsay, whose cosmopolitan world view influenced many students, 
especially non-traditional students. Recipients must be enrolled for at least six hours and have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or a 
GPA of 3.0 on the last 12 hours of course study. 

The ARTHUR T. MEILINGER ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIP is an annual award of $750 to a fijll-time business major, 
working at least 25 hours a week, a rising senior with over 90 credit hours, USC Upstate minimum GPA of 3.0, and a resident 
of South Carolina. 

The NANCY P. MOORE SCHOLARSHIP for $500 was established to honor Dr. Nancy Moore for her commitment to 
scholarship and teaching at USC Upstate and her service in the upstate community. Recipient must be a fiill-time English 
major who has sophomore or upper class standing with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5. Recipients must also be involved 
in some type of volunteer work. 

NATURAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIPS are awarded in the spring and fall semester to students 
enrolled in programs leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in biology, including pre-professional tracks and chemistry. A 
maximum of one-half semester tuition may be awarded to an applicant. The requirement is a minimum cumulative GPA of 
3.0 on at least 60 semester hours credit by the end of the term in which the application is submitted. At least 30 credit hours 
must have been earned at USC Upstate. 

NATURAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING PRE-PROFESSIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS are awarded in the spring 
and fall semester to students enrolled in pre-professional tracks in which the Bachelor of Science degree is not completed at 
USC Upstate. A maximum of one-quarter semester's tuition may be awarded to an applicant. The requirement is a minimum 
cumulative GPA of 3.0 on at least 30 semester hours credit by the end of the term of which the application was submitted. At 
least 15 credit hours must have been earned at USC Upstate by the end of the term in which the application was submitted. 

The RICK O'BRIEN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP is a scholarship of $400 awarded to a full-time junior or senior 
business administration major with a concentration in accounting. The recipient must have a cumulative 3.0 grade point 
average and be employed a minimum of 10 hours per week. Preference is given to a student involved in community vol- 
unteer work. 

The GREENVILLE NEWS SCHOLARSHIP is an award of $ 1 000 tuition assistance disbursed $500 Fall and Spring semes- 
ters of the awarded year. The scholarship is awarded to a student currently registered in the Visual Arts program who meets 
the criteria of currently enrolled in Upstate Visual Arts courses, registered Art major; completed a minimum of 30 hours and a 
3.0 cumulative GPA. Applications accepted each spring for fall disbursement. Annual deadline for applications will be April 
1 , award to be announced by May 30. 

The PIEDMONT DISTRICT NURSES ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP provides a $500 scholarship for a nursing 
major who is enrolled in at least six credit hours. Recipients must be a South Carolina resident with at least a 3.0 high school 
or college cumulative GPA. 

The SONYA K. RUPPE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP is a $500 award given to a new freshman education major from 
Gaffhey High School. 

The MATTHEW POLIAKOFF SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT is an award of $500 to a junior with financial need, who 
has a cumulative 3.0 GPA, and is majoring in political science or business administration, or is following a pre-law program. 
Preference is given to students who demonstrate an interest in and plan to participate in governmental processes. 

Financial Aid 33 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



The POLITICAL SCreNCE SCHOLARSHIP for $200 is awarded during the spring semester to a student who is a full-time 
junior political science major with an overall cumulative GPA of 3.25. Candidate must show potential for graduate work in 
a political science-related field. 

The PRYM CONSUMER USA BUSINESS SCHOLARSHIP for $750 is awarded to a Johnson College of Business senior 
(candidate for graduation during the year of the award — minimum of 30 hours taken at USC Upstate). 

The PRYM CONSUMER USA NON-TRADITIONAL STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP for $750 is awarded to a Johnson 
College of Business major, preferably one beginning or resuming college work after an extended period of absence from 
academic studies. 

ROTC SCHOLARSHIPS are awards that pay partial tuition and textbook costs. A $1,000 subsistence allowance may be 
used to assist with other miscellaneous academic expenses. 

The SPARTANBURG ROTARY CLUB SCHOLARSHIP is a $ 1 ,000 annual award to a ftill-time Spartanburg County resident 
who is from a non-Rotarian family, has financial need, and has proven scholastic aptitude. 

The OLIN & MUFFET SANSBURY SCHOLARSHIP is an award of $1,000 to a student with academic ability, financial 
need, and potential as a contributing citizen of school and community. Preference is given to those students planning a career 
in public affairs. 

The D.L. SCURRY FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS: Several $500 scholarships awarded to South Carolina residents 
who demonstrate academic ability, have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0, and have financial need. 

The SIMOTON SCHOLARSHIP provides $250 a year financial assistance to the president of the African American As- 
sociation at USC Upstate. The recipient will also serve as an active member of the Executive Board of the East Spartanburg 
Branch of the NAACP. 

The CLINTON RICHARD SMITH SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT is awarded to a full-time Johnson College of 
Business student who has financial need. Preference is given to a married student whose parents are engaged in a local small 
business or industry. 

The FRANCES SMITH NURSING SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT provides an award annually to a full-time nursing 
student who has financial need. Preference is given to non-traditional students. 

The SPARTANBURG COUNTY FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP provides a four-year scholarship of $1,000 each 
academic year to a new freshman. The recipient must reflect academic promise, financial need, be a resident of Spartanburg 
County and be a graduate of a Spartanburg County secondary school. 

The TERESA TILLER SPLAWN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP is an award to a nursing student who has previously 
worked in a nonprofessional health service position. 

The JOHN C. STOCKWELL AND DIANE C. VECCHIO INTERNATIONAL AWARD is a $6,000 scholarship estab- 
lished to fund a summer of international travel and study for a full-time USC Upstate junior who is a South Carolina resident. 
The recipient must have at least a 3.0 cumulative USC Upstate GPA by the end of his/her sophomore year. Applications with 
fiill criteria may be obtained from the director of the Office of International Studies. November 1 of the applicant's junior 
year is the deadline. 

The N.A. STIRZAKER SCHOLARSHIP is an award for a ftill-time USC Upstate junior with high academic standing. The 
award is renewable for the recipient's senior year if a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 is maintained. Dr. Norbert A. Stirzaker 
was the first director of USC Upstate, and this scholarship was created by his colleagues and friends in tribute to his many 
years of service to the University. 

The EDITH THROWER NURSING SCHOLARSHIP is an award made to an associate degree or baccalaureate nursing 
student who is enrolled either full-time or part-time. Recipients must have a proven academic ability and financial need. 
Preference is given to a non-traditional student (25 or older) who has family responsibilities. 

The DENISE TONE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP was established by the friends and family of Denise Tone. The 
proceeds from the endowment will be awarded by the scholarship committee of the Mary Black School of Nursing to 
students enrolled in a nursing program in recognition of academic excellence. Preference will be given to a student with a 
chronic illness. 

34 Financial Aid 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIPS are awards of varying amounts made to freshmen 
from the several judicial circuits in South Carolina and from metropolitan areas outside the state. The awards are based on 
academic ability and are renewable. Note: There is a specific application for this scholarship, and it must be sent to USC 
Alumni Association in Columbia, SC. 

The UPSTATE FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND provides financial assistance to a full-time or part-time student that is 
of the USC Upstate family-employee spouse or dependent. A $1000 annual scholarship shall be distributed in increments of 
$500 per semester for the student who closely meets the criteria of, member of the USC Upstate family: employee, spouse or 
dependent; must be employed at USC Upstate a minimum of 1 year; financial need; 2.5 or higher GPA. 

The USC FACULTY/STAFF DEPENDENTS' SCHOLARSHIP is open for application to any dependent child or spouse 
of a fijll-time University of South Carolina system employee. There is competition for this scholarship, and only a limited 
number of scholarships are awarded each year. To be eligible for consideration, the applicant must be enrolled or accepted 
for enrollment as a full-time undergraduate or graduate student on one of the University's eight campuses and have attained 
a minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA. Freshman eligibility is determined by high school class rank and SAT or ACT scores. The 
scholarship is renewable for up to four years for those students pursuing a baccalaureate degree provided the recipient maintains 
a minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA. In some cases, graduate students may receive the scholarship until receipt of their graduate 
degrees. Note: There is a specific application for this scholarship that must be sent to USC Columbia. 

The MATHEMATICS SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND is awarded to an incoming freshman interested in pursu- 
ing a degree in mathematics. Recipient must have at least a 3.5 cumulative high school grade point average and SAT score 
of at least 1100. The scholarship is awarded to fulltime students and may be renewable for up to seven semesters provided 
the student continues to major in mathematics, maintains a cumulative overall GPA of 3.0, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 in 
mathematics courses. 

WESLEY K. WILBER SCHOLARSHIP is an endowment created to assist male, non-traditional students majoring in busi- 
ness, with financial need, and not eligible for state merit based scholarships. The student must complete the FAFSA, and can 
be enrolled full or part-time. 

The ED AND CONNIE WILDE ENDOWMENT SCHOLARSHIP is given to provide a $500 annual award to a player on the 
USC Upstate Men's Soccer team. The recipient must be a returning member of the men's Varsity Soccer Team, have demonstrated 
good character and achieved academically. Preference is given to a player who has been involved in community service. 

ED WILDE WOMEN'S SOCCER SCHOLARSHIP goes to fund a $500 annual award to a player on the USC Upstate 
Women's Soccer team. The recipient must be a returning member of the Women's Varsity Team, should have demonstrated 
good character and achieved academically. Preference is given to a player who has been involved in community service. 

The DONALD W. YATES SCHOLARSHIP provides $ 1 000 of annual assistance to a part-time or full-time business major, 
with an emphasis on marketing, that does not qualify for any state merit based scholarships. The student must also have finan- 
cial need (as defined by the U.S. Department of Education) and be a non-traditional student, rising senior with more than 90 
hours of credit and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher. 

CAREER CENTER NURSING SCHOLARSHIP provides $ 1 000 to an Upper division Nursing student with financial need. 

MARJORIE BOURKE MEMORIAL NURSING ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP assist a full-time student enrolled in 
the Mary Black School of Nursing, carrying 12 or more hours per semester with a USC Upstate minimum GPA of 2.5 and 
completed the FAFSA. 

MRS. INEZ G. AVERY SCHOLARSHIP provides $1200 financial assistance to a full-time student seeking a degree in 
the School of Education. Recipient must have financial need (must complete FAFSA fonn), preference given to an Afi"ican 
American student, must be of high moral character, and a rising senior with more than 90 hours with a 2.5 GPA. 

R. EDWARD AVERY SCHOLARSHIP provides $1200 financial assistance to a student seeking a degree in the Johnson 
College of Business and Economics. Recipient maybe part-time or full-time, must have financial need (must complete FAFSA 
form), preference given to an African-American student, must be of high moral character, and a rising senior with more than 
90 hours with a 2.5 GPA. 

LOU VIGNEAULT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP provides financial assistance to a student in the Department of Fine 
Arts & Communications with a $500 per semester award. The scholarship is awarded to a full-time declared theatre major or 
minor, must maintain a 2.5 overall cumulative GPA and maintain a 3.0 GPA in all theatre classes. Student must audition for 
each production in the Shoestring Players season and accept any role offered. Student must also participate technically in any 
show not cast and write a letter to the Vigneault family each semester of award. 

Financial Aid 35 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



BILLIE WEISS-MCABEE SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established to assist a full-time, non-traditional student. The recipi- 
ent must complete the FAFSA form, carry 12 or more hours per semester and not be eligible for any state scholarships. 

SOUTH CAROLINA ASSOCIATION OF CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS / PIEDMONT CHAPTER 
SCHOLARSHIP provides assistance to a full-time student who wants to pursue a career in accounting. Recipient must be a 
rising junior with 60 hours of earned credit with a minimum 3.0 GPA, business major in accounting, and have demonstrated 
financial need (must complete FAFSA form). 

COLLEGE POINTE ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND provides $1000 for incoming or remming student who is 
a resident in good standing at College Pointe Apartments. Recipient must be full-time, in good standing academically, and 
demonstrate financial need. 

CURTIS R. HARLEY ART GALLERY FUND provides up to $1000 of tuition assistance to a full-time art major, currently 
enrolled in art courses, who is a graduate of a public Spartanburg County secondary school, and has at least 30 credit hours 
with a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA. 

The RACHEL SUZANNE WEST MEMORIAL NURSING SCHOLARSHIP provides financial assistance to a fiiU-time 
student accepted into the Mary Black School of Nursing, who is pursuing a career in the health field. Student must have com- 
pleted 90 credit hours, demonstrate financial need by completing FAFSA and maintain 3.0 GPA. 

CRAIG PRESSLEY GIEGERICH '02 MEMORIAL ACCOUNTING SCHOLARSHIP provides financial assistance to 
a fiill-time student that wants to pursue a career in the accounting field. Recipient must be a business major with emphasis in 
accounting, have completed 90 credit hours with a cumulative 3.2 GPA, expressed financial need, and S.C. resident. 

JERRY BENNETT SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT is awarded to a transfer student from the state's technical college 
system, with preference given to students from Spartanburg Community College and Greenville Technical College, to help 
pursue a major in accounting at USC Upstate. Recipient must be a full-time student, business major with financial need as 
defined by the Department of Education (must complete FAFSA). 

The MARTIE G. CHASTAIN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP is an award to a fiill-time junior or senior business admin- 
istration major with a 2.5 cumulative GPA and who is employed at least 15 hours per week. 

The PAUL FOERSTER EXCELLENCE IN NURSING AWARD goes each year to a full-time senior nursing student en- 
rolled in the BSN program who has financial need, has a record of service to the University and the community, and who has 
at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA. The award is given in honor of Paul F. Foerster's volunteer service to improve the health and 
wellness of the people and communities of Spartanburg County. The scholarship is supported by the Mary Black Foundation, 
Mary Black Hospital, and the Spartanburg Regional Medical Center 

The SEYMOUR ROSENBERG SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT is awarded to students on the basis of academic ability, 
leadership qualities, and school and community involvement. Preference will be given to students who have demonstrated an 
active interest in print and/or broadcast media. To qualify for renewal the recipient must maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA and 
demonstrate active involvement with campus publications or journalism-related activities. To qualify for third- or fourth-year 
renewal, a student must maintain a cumulative 3.0 grade point average, demonstrate active involvement in journalism-related 
activities, and pursue upper division studies in journalism. 

The UNIVERSITY BUSINESS SOCIETY SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to a full-time senior in the Johnson College of 
Business who has a cumulative GPA of 3.0 and who has demonstrated outstanding service to campus and community, academic 
aptitude, character and leadership. 



Many scholarships and stipends may be combined with other sources of financial assistance for which a student is eligible. 
However, a student may not receive more than one fiill-tuition University scholarship. Students wishing to be considered for 
scholarships must be unconditionally accepted for admission prior to deadlines. USC Upstate students who are awarded scholar- 
ships or stipends are required to be in good academic standing. These students must also be free of any current discipline code 
violation and may not be on disciplinary probation. 

(Scholarship infonnation is accurate at the time of publication. Availability offunck and other factors may change. 
For further information about scholarships and other financial aid. please contact the financial aid office.) 

36 Financial Aid 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 




Fees and Expenses 



Academic Fees 

Academic fees at the University of South Carolina 
Upstate are established by the University of South Carohna 
Board of Trustees and are subject to change. Fees printed 
in this publication are proposed for 2007-2008. 

Application Fee 

Every new degree-seeking student is charged a non- 
refiindable application fee of $40. Exceptions to this charge 
may be made for certain special categories of admission. 
Non-degree-seeking students must pay a non-refundable 
application fee of $10. Applications for admission must 
be accompanied by the application fee. 

International Students 

International students must ordinarily pay non-resi- 
dent fees for the duration of their enrollment, unless they 
qualify for permanent alien status. Their standing in this 
category and application for resident fees must be cleared 
with the residency officer in the admissions office. 

Examination Fees 

Special examinations to establish undergraduate col- 
lege credit without class attendance, or to validate credits 
from a non-accredited college, cost $15 per semester 
hour. 

Estimated Tuition' 

All fees are payable in fiill at the beginning of each 
term. 

Undergraduate - 

Full-time students (12-16 semester hours) 

SC residents $3,750 per semester 

Non-residents $7,746 per semester 

Full-time students (17 semester hours and above) 

SC residents $80 per semester hour 

Non-residents $160 per semester hour 

Part-time and summer school students 

SC residents $322 per semester hour 

Non-residents $665 per semester hour 

Graduate - 

Full-time students (12-16 semester hours) 

SC residents $4,444 per semester 

Non-residents $9,590 per semester 

Part-time and summer school students 

SC residents S440 per semester hour 

Non-residents $936 per semester hour 

Certified Teachers 

SC residents $305 per semester hour 

Non-residents $338 per semester hour 

Students taking courses at more than one University 
of South Carolina campus are charged the appropriate 
campus rate per hour for each course taken. These charges 
may be in addition to the maximum fees, if reached, at 
the student's home campus. For example, a student tak- 
ing 12 hours (or more) at USC Upstate and three hours 
at Union will be charged the full-tuition rate for the USC 

Is 



Upstate courses plus the cost of the course taken at Union 
calculated at the Union rate per hour. 

Course auditing 

Course auditing fees are the same as courses taken 
for credit. 

Senior citizens 

Legal residents of South Carolina who have attained 
the age of 60 and meet admission and other standards 
deemed appropriate by the University may attend classes 
tuition-free for credit or audit purposes on a space-avail- 
able basis. 

Meals' 

Each resident living in University housing is required to 
purchase a meal plan. Equivalencies, available with the 
meal plan, can be used by students for food purchases in 
the Dining Hall and at on-campus eateries SubConnection 
and Mochappelli's. 



Carte Blanche with 5 equivalencies $1,150 



Housing' 

Palmetto Villas apartment-style complex for 
upperclassman 

Double room (per semester, per student) $1,700 

Palmetto House traditional-style complex for 
freshman 

Single room (per semester, per student) $2,400 
Double room (per semester, per student) $2,000 

Summer Term Housing 

for freshman and upperclassman 

(per Maymester term, per student) $275 

(per summer term, per student) $375 

NOTE: an advance room payment of $100 and $35 
application fee are required for both Palmetto House 
and Palmetto Villas. 

Insurance 

Optional student health and accident insurance is 
available to all full-time students paying full fees. It may 
regularly be purchased only at the beginning of the fall 
semester, except in the case of new and transfer students. 
Contact the student affairs office for details on coverage and 
fees. International students are required to have adequate 
health insurance coverage. I fproofofsuch coverage cannot 
be provided, students will automatically be charged for 
the University-approved plan for $394 for fall semester 
and $55 1 for spring/summer semester. 



' Fees are subject to change as appmved by the USC Boardof Trustees. 
Additional fees may be required in specific majors. 



Fees and Expenses 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Other Fees' 

Matriculation fee- $75 

Technology fee $8 per credit hour (part-time) 

$130 per semester (full-time) 

Health fee $4 per credit hour (part-time) 

$45 per semester (full-time) 

Replacement of diploma as originally issued....$25 

Transcript fee (each copy) $8 

Duplicate registration certificate fees 

Replacement identification card $10 

Replacement treasurer's fee receipt $5 

Reinstatement $60 

Parking: Students are charged a parking/security 
fee each semester as follows. Students must 
display a USC Upstate parking sticker on each 
vehicle, and comply with regulations as set forth 
on Page 45. 

Single semester $35 

Summer term $12 

Estimated Expenses for One Academic Year' 

Note: The following estimate represents a reasonable 
minimum forfiill-time enrollment : it does not include meals, 
travel, room and board and other incidental expenses. 

South Carolina residents: 

Academic fees, full-time 

($3,750 per semester) $7,500 

Books (estimate: $450 per semester) $900 

Other fees $420 

Total $8,820 

Non-residents: 

Academic fees, full-time 

($7,746 per semester) $15,492 

Books (estimate: $450 per semester) $900 

Other fees $420 

Total $16,812 



Parking: 

Parking improperly $15 

Parking decal or permit not displayed $5 

Parking in no parking area $15 

Parking in loading or service zone $15 

Blocking sidewalks or driveways $15 

No parking permit for zone $15 

Parking at fire plug, in lane $50 

Parking on grass $15 

Parking along yellow curbs $15 

Parking in reserved spaces $15 

Failure to register vehicle $15 

Parking in handicap space 

(fine set by state law) $100 

Blocking space or curb cut $100 

Refunds 

University charges are to be paid in fitll on the date 
they are incurred. Refunds are issued according to the 
schedules in this section to students who withdraw from 
the University, to part-time students who drop a course 
or courses, and to full-time students who are reclassified 
as part-time students as a result of dropping a course or 
courses. 

Based on current federal regulations, students re- 
ceiving federal Title IV financial assistance "earn" that 
assistance as they attend the University. All federal Title 
IV financial assistance is considered fijlly earned when 
the student has been enrolled past the 60% point of the 
enrollment term. If a student withdraws from the Univer- 
sity prior to that 60% point, the unearned portion of the 
federal Title IV financial assistance must be returned to 
the source(s) of the fiinds. This is an obligation of both 
the University and the student. 

The University is obligated to repay a calculated 
amount of the unearned portion of the student's Title IV 
financial aid, and this repayment is made from University 
fiinds. To the extent this repayment exceeds any applicable 
University policy refiind, this amount is the financial obli- 
gation of the student to the University. To the extent total 
unearned federal Title IV financial assistance exceeds the 
portion repaid by the University, that amount is a financial 
obligation of the student to the lender and/or the Depart- 
ment of Education. 



Fines' 



Bad checks or credit cards returned for 
any reason: $30 plus late fee if used for 
payment of enrollment fees. 

Damage: Students are charged for damage 
to university property or equipment. 



The return of the University's repayment is made in the 
following regulation prescribed priority sequence. 

1. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford loans 

2. Subsidized Federal Stafford loans 

3. Federal Perkins loans 

'Fees are subject to change as approved by the USC BoardofTrustees. 
Additional fees may be required in specific majors. 

- A one-lime fee paid by new degree-seelcing students. 



Fees and Expenses 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



39 



4. Federal PLUS loans received on behalf 
of students 

5. Federal Pell grants 

6. Federal SKOG program aid 

7. Other Title IV funds 

University policy refunds for withdrawing students 
who ha\e received non-Title IV financial aid, will be 
applied to the source{s) of that financial aid before any 
refund is made to the student. 

The University administers refund policies for Title IV 
financial aid recipients as required by the Federal Higher 
Education Act. Immediately following is the standard 
university refund schedule. Specific refund dates are pub- 
lished in the course schedule for each semester. Additional 
information regarding federal refund policies is available 
in the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships. 



Complete 
Withdrawals' 



Course 
Drops' 



Fall and Spring Semesters 

By the last day of the late registration period 100% 

By the end ot'the first week ofclasses 100% 100% 

By the end of the 10% period of the enrollment period 90% 70% 

By the end of the 16% period of the enrollment period 70% 70% 

By the end of the 25% period of the enrollment period 50% 0% 

By the end of the 50% period of the enrollment period 25% 0% 

Summer Terms 

By the last day of the late registration period 100% 100% 

By the end of the 10% period of the enrollment period 90% 40% 

By the end of the 25% penod of the enrollment period 50% 40% 

By the end of the 36% period of the enrollment period 40% 40% 

By the end of the 50% period of the enrollment period 25% 25% 



State Residency Requirements 

The University of South Carolina Upstate assesses 
tuition and fees upon the basis of state residency. The rules 
regarding the establishment of legal residency for tuition 
and fee purposes for institutions of higher education are 
governed by the South Carolina Code of Laws. A copy 
of this law in its entirety is available from the Office of 
Admissions. 

The initial resident status determination is made at the 
time of admission and prevails until such time that a student 
establishes a proper claim to residency as defined by the 
laws of South Carolina. Any student who is discovered 
to have been improperly classified as a South Carolina 
resident will be reclassified as a non-resident and will be 
required to pay differences in fees. 

Persons having questions about residency are encour- 
aged to secure a Residency Application Package from the 
Office of Admissions. Appointments with the director of 
admissions to discuss residency requirements are also 
encouraged. 

The University reserves the right to alter any charges 
without notice. All charges are due and payable on the date 
that they are incurred, or the date indicated on the ticket, 
invoice or statement. Checks for the exact amount of the 
total charges should be made payable to the University 
of South Carolina Upstate. 

Students failing to pay all required registration fees 
on or before the last date to change course schedule (as 
indicated in the university calendar) may be dropped from 
class rolls. 

Students failing to relieve any other indebtedness to 
the University or to any of its auxiliary agencies on the 
date such obligations become due and payable may not 
be permitted to attend classes, stand final examinations, 
or be issued a transcript, diploma, degree or any other 
official statement. 



'Refunds for complete withdrawals cover tuition, fees, housing and 
meal plans at the appropriate percentage. 

■Refunds for course drops cover tuition only at the appropriate 
percentage. 



40 



Fees and Expenses 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 




Student and Diversity Affairs 



The co-curricular program at the University of South 
Carolina Upstate is committed to the total development of 
students as individuals. Comprehensive services and activi- 
ties are provided to complement the students' academic 
experience. These activities are organized to promote the 
holistic development of university students. 

The Division of Student and 
Diversity Affairs 

The Student and Diversity Affairs division is an 
integral component of the University of South Carolina 
Upstate. Its programs and services are designed to sup- 
port the overall mission of the University by enhancing 
the cognitive, moral, cultural, physical, social, civic and 
interpersonal development of the institution's students. 

The Student and Diversity Affairs Division sponsors 
programs and services that are designed to: 

♦ assist students in the successful transition to and 
from college; 

help students explore and clarify their values; 
encourage students to develop healthy relation- 
ships with others (i.e., parents, peers, faculty and 
staff); 

create opportunities for students to expand their 
aesthetic and cultural appreciation; 
teach students how to resolve individual and 
group conflicts; 

help students understand, respect and appreciate 
racial, ethnic, gender and other differences; 
provide opportunities for leadership develop- 
ment; 

offer programs that provide primary health care 
for students and encourage healthy living; 
provide opportunities for recreation and leisure- 
time activities; 

help retain students in school and promote their 
intellectual development and academic suc- 
cess; 

provide opportunities for students to develop and 
model responsible citizenship behavior; 
enable students to develop realistic educational 
and career goals; 

promote the development of ethical and respon- 
sible conduct; 

facilitatepersonal and interpersonal development 
through an increased capacity to understand one's 
self and relate effectively to others; and 
establish activities and programs that encourage 
students to reason; organize; plan and execute 
complex tasks; set goals; solve problems; make 
sound decisions; analyze complex situations, and 
manage time and resources effectively. 
Ensure campus accessibil ity and protect the safety 
of all students, faculty and staff 



The following oflfices and fiinctions are included within 
the Student and Diversity Affairs division: 

Student and Diversity Affairs 
Administration 

• Assessment and Planning 

• Division Administrative Compliance 
Overall Fiscal Management 

• Performing Groups 
Overall Supervision 

• Undergraduate Assistantships 

• Campus Diversity 

• University Police Administration 

• Data Management 

Multicultural Student Services 

• Diversity Training 

• Multicultural Programs 

Housing & Residential Life 

• Facility Management 
Living/Learning Program 

• Resident Assistant Training 

• Student Housing Administration 

• Summer Camps 

Student Development 

Alcohol and Drug Education Programs 

• Educational Workshops 
Counseling 

• Awareness Events 

• Referral 

Counseling Services 

• Personal and Career Counseling 

• Psychoeducational Workshops 
Personality Testing 

• Yoga 

• MAT and Dantes Administration 
Referral 

Disability Services 

• Services and Accommodations for 
students with disabilities 

• Peer Academic Coaching 

• Campus Accessibility 

• Access Issues 

• ADA Compliance 

Health Services 

• Education 
Health Screenings 

• Primary Health Care 

• Wellness Promotion 



42 



Student and Diversity Affairs 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Non-Traditional Student Services 

• Advocacy for Non-traditional 
students 

• Consultation and Referral 
Networking to build support among 
non-traditional students 

Student Life 

Campus Activities 
Community Service 
Multicultural Affairs 
Enrolled Student Publications 
Greek Life 

Student Organizations 
Leadership Development 
Discipline 

University Police 

• Community-Oriented Policing 

• Incident Management 

• Parking Services 

• Safety Programs 
Protective Services 



Housing & Residential Life 

use Upstate currently offers traditional-style 
housing for freshman and apartment-style housing for 
upperclassman. Students residing on campus are required 
to purchase a meal plan. Early application for housing is 
recommended. 

Palmetto Villas is an on-campus, apartment style 
residential complex that is operated and supervised by 
the University. It houses 348 upperclassman in two-bed- 
room units that are furnished, air-conditioned, and has a 
kitchen with stove, refrigerator, dishwater and disposal. 
All units are networked as part of the USC Upstate system. 
A recreation area with pool, laundry and basketball and 
volleyball courts are available. 

Palmetto House, a $ 1 5 million, 1 05,000-square-foot 
residential facility for 348 freshmen, opened in January 
2004. The complex consists of single and double occupancy 
rooms, open areas, and three recreation rooms. Each hall 
features a private study area and laundry facilities. In addi- 
tion, there is a recreation room with three flat screen TVs, 
an assortment of games (billiards, ping-pong, foosball, air 
hockey) plus a vending area. This coeducational facility 
hascontroUed access, fijll sprinkler system, Intemetaccess, 
cable television, green space, and adjacent parking. 

Student Development 

Student Development is comprised of the following 
areas: Alcohol and Drug Education Programs, Counsel- 
ing Services, Disability Services, Health Services and 
Non-Traditional Student Services. Student Development 
provides a wide range of support for the USC Upstate 
student community. 



Alcohol and Drug Education Programs 

USC Upstate's Alcohol and Drug Education Programs 
promotes low-risk, healthy choices about alcohol and 
other drugs by providing educational workshops, media 
campaigns, substance-free events and counseling services. 
The goal is to promote low-risk, healthy choices and to 
prevent impainnents in academic achievement, personal 
development and productivity. Services are provided 
by certified, master's-level counselors with experience 
in alcohol and drug issues. For information about these 
programs, please contact the office at 864-503-5195 or 
visit the Campus Life Center, Suite 107. Office hours are 
Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 

Counseling Services 

Counseling is available to assist students in reaching 
personal and educational goals. Counseling is short-term, 
solution based and provided in an atmosphere focusing on 
growth and change. The counseling staff includes three 
Counselors with advanced degrees and training. Additional 
services include couples and group counseling, outreach 
programming, assistance in career exploration and plan- 
ning and psychoeducational workshops. Counseling is 
confidential, unlimited and provided free of charge to 
all students. Services are available in the Campus Life 
Center, Suite 107, Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5 
p.m., and Thursday from 8:30a.m.-8:00p.m. Additional 
hours available upon request. 

Disability Services 

Disability Services coordinates services and accom- 
modations for students, faculty, and staff with disabilities 
in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 
1 973 and Title 1 1 of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The 
office works to ensure equal access to University facilities 
and programs in order to meet the individual needs of all 
members of the campus community. Examples of possible 
accommodations include: sign language interpreting ser- 
vices, alternative test administration, note-taking services, 
textbooks in electronic format, Brailled documents/tests, 
and priority registration. For information about services 
and eligibility, please call 864-503-5 1 95 or visit the Campus 
Life Center. Suite 107. Office hours are 8:30 am - 5:00 
p.m. Monday-Friday. Testing Center opens at 8:00 a.m. 
for scheduled tests. Additional extended hours available 
by advance appointment only. 

Health Services 

Health Services provides students with quality indi- 
vidualized and quality health care, as well as information 
to help students stay healthy. These services include urgent 
care, physical exams, family planning, vaccinations, minor 
laboratory tests, health screenings, health education and 
promotion. If necessary, referrals are made to area physi- 
cians and specialists. Services for students are either free 
or a minimal fee (physicals, laby tests, flu shots, CPR, 
etc.). For more information about services, please visit 
our Web site at www.uscupstate.edu/campus_services/ 
health/. If you need to speak directly with someone, 
you may call (864) 503-5191 or visit Health Services in 
Palmetto Villas Building 1. Office hours are 8:30 a.m.-5 
p.m., Monday-Friday. 



Student and Diversity Affairs 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



43 



Non-Traditional Student Services 

Non-Traditional Student Services offers support to 
students who are in any of the following categories: 25 
years of age or older, married and/or parents, veterans of 
the armed forces, w orking full-time and attending college, 
and college or university graduates returning to school. 
This serv ice focuses on assisting Non-Traditional Students 
in transitioning to college and linking them with appro- 
priate support ser\ ices to meet their diverse needs. For 
information, contact a non-traditional student advocate. 
Advocates are located in the Campus Life Center Suite 
107, (864) 503-5 195, and are available from 8:30 a.m.-5 
p.m., Monday- Wednesday and Friday and Thursday from 
8:30 a.m.-8:00 p.m. 



Campus Media 

The Carolinian, the weekly campus newspaper, is 
published by students. It contains information pertaining 
to student life, club news, sports news and features. 

writersINC. is an annual literary and art magazine, 
edited by students, that publishes the work of students, 
faculty members and others. 

Social Fraternities and Sororities 

use Upstate has chapters of Alpha Kappa Alpha, 
Delta Sigma Theta, Delta Zeta, Kappa Alpha Psi, Kappa 
Sigma, Phi Mu, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Gamma 
Rho, Zeta Phi Beta and Zeta Tau Alpha. 



Student Life 

Involvement in co-curricular and extracurricular ac- 
tivities is an important aspect of college life. The Office 
of Student Life in the Division of Student and Diversity 
Affairs provides support for a wide variety of activities, 
clubs and organizations for the student body. 

Campus Activities Board 

The purpose of the Campus Activities Board is to 
promote entertainment, cultural development and social 
interaction among students, faculty and staff through a 
variety of events. These include dances, plays, concerts, 
comedians, parties, and recreational activities. In return 
for their hard work, CAB members are given opportunities 
to participate in retreats, conventions, and many leader- 
ship activities. 

Campus Recreation & Fitness Department 

The Recreation and Fitness Department offers stu- 
dents, faculty and staff a variety of programs, services and 
activities to increase physical fitness and enjoyment. The 
department is responsible forthe University's health/fitness 
facility and directs the institution's intramural recreation 
program. Aquatics, team sports and conditioning oppor- 
tunities are available for the entire campus community 
throughout the academic year and summer. 

IMPACT Community Service Program 

The use Upstate IMPACT Community Service 
program provides a means of uniting the campus and 
community by promoti ng good relations between students, 
faculty members and administrators from a variety of 
backgrounds. This monthly series provides community 
service activities for all students at a variety of service 
locations. IMPACT also sponsors a Freshman Day of 
Service, which occurs before classes begin in August. 

Multicultural Affairs 

The Office ofMulticultural Affairs offers a wide range 
of programs to promote appreciation and understanding 
of diverse cultures and people. The office maintains a 
mentoring program; facilitates cultural programs; and 
provides many other valuable opportunities and resources 
for students, faculty and staff. 



Academic and Honorary Organizations 

A number of academic and honorary organizations are 
available for students to join. These include the Account- 
ing Club, Alpha Mu Gamma, Chemistry Club, Computer 
Science Club, Club Art and Design, Criminal Justice Club, 
Diversity in Business Students, French Club, Gamma Beta 
Phi, Health Professionals Club, History Club, IMS Student 
Association, International Club, Kappa Delta Pi, Literary 
Club, Marketing Club, Math Club, Pi Gamma Mu, Pi Sigma 
Alpha, Psychology Club, Science Club, Sigma Tau Delta, 
Sociology Club, Special Education Club, Student Nurses 
Association, Teachers Educating All Children (TEACh), 
University Business Society and Writers Inc. 

Special Interest Organizations 

Among the campus organizations geared toward 
special interests are the African-American Association, 
Aliya Urban Hip Hop Dance Clique, American Humanics 
Student Association, Amnesty International, Asian Club, 
Baptist Collegiate Ministry, Campus Activities Board, 
Campus Crusade for Christ, Current Affairs and Political 
Science Club (CAPS), Equestrian Club, Fellowship of 
Christian Athletes in Action (FCAIA), Hispanic Aware- 
ness Association (HAA), IMPACT, Ladies of Service, 
Collegiate 1 00, Scuba and Snorkel Club, Students for the 
Ethical Treatment of Animals (SETA), Students Against 
a Violent Environment ( SAVE ), Student Government As- 
sociation, Student Pagan Association, Upstate DeutchKlub, 
Upstate Feminists, Upstate College Democrats, Upstate 
College Republicans. 

Performance Groups 

The Shoestring Players, the USC Upstate theater 
group, stages several major productions each year in the 
USC Upstate Performing Arts Center. 

The University has several musical groups — the 
University Singers, the USC Upstate .lazz Band and the 
Gordon-Colloms Gospel Choir — that perform in concert 
and for special events. 

The USC Upstate Debate Team gives students the 
opportunity to improve their research, reasoning and com- 
munications skills by competing with each other and with 
teams from other colleges and universities. 



44 



Student and Diversity Affairs 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



The Mock Trial Team helps students develop skills in 
formulating and presenting legal theory and arguments as 
well as many other team work and professional skills. 

The use Upstate Cheerleaders promote school spirit 
and support for the athletic program by cheering at pep 
rallies, basketball games and other athletic events. 

The use Upstate Dance Team performs at various 
campus and ofif-campus events, representing the school 
and promoting school spirit. 

The Model United Nations encourages a greater 
awareness of the role of the United Nations in the peaceftil 
resolution of international conflicts. Students are given 
an opportunity to participate in Model U.N. programs and 
develop their skills in oral and written communication. 

Student Government Association 

The Student Government Association is the official 
elected body that represents all USC Upstate students. SGA 
officers work to conduct student functions and to maintain 
lines of communication among the faculty, the adminis- 
tration, and the student body. Students are appointed to 
various university committees upon the recommendations 
of the SGA. Student organizations are chartered upon its 
recommendations. 



University Police 

The University Police patrols the campus on foot, 
bicycle, and in marked vehicles around the clock. The 
department has 13 full-time uniformed patrol officers, all 
of whom are graduates of the South Carolina Criminal Jus- 
tice Academy and commissioned as state constables with 
statewide arrest authority. Emergency telephones, located 
throughout the campus and on the outside of buildings, 
are activated by picking up the receiver or pushing the 
button on front of the callbox, which connects the caller 
with the University Police. 

Parking and Traffic Regulations 

All vehicles driven or parked on campus must be 
registered with the University Police. Parking permits 
must be clearly displayed at all times while the vehicle 
is on campus. Cars parked in restricted lots without the 
proper decal being displayed are subject to being towed. 
A schedule of fees for student parking permits is in the 
"Fees and Expenses" section of this catalog. 

Parking regulations are strictly enforced, including a 
state-mandated $ 1 00 fine for parking in a space reserved for 
the handicapped without a permit to do so. Unless otherwise 
posted, the campus speed limit is 25 miles per hour. 



Student Conduct Regulations 

The University of South Carolina Upstate is an aca- 
demic community preserved through the mutual respect 
and trust of the individuals who learn, teach and work 
within it. Inherent in the Code of Student Conduct is the 
belief in each individual's honesty, self-discipline and 
sense of responsibility. 



Code of Academic Integrity 

It shall be the responsibility of every student at USC 
Upstate to obey and to support the enforcement of the 
Academic Integrity Code, which prohibits lying, cheating 
or stealing. For details of the honor code, procedures for 
handling complaints, and penalties for violations, consult 
the USC Upstate Student Handbook. 

Code of Student Behavior 

It is also the responsibility of every student at USC 
Upstate to abide by the Code of Student Behavior, to con- 
duct oneself so as not to impair significantly the welfare 
or the educational opportunities of others in the university 
community. All non-academic conduct that infringes upon 
the rights and welfare of others is thus embodied in the 
Campus Disciplinary Code. Violations are handled in the 
same manner as violations of the Academic Integrity Code. 
Consult the USC Upstate Student Handbook for details. 



General Regulations 

Alcohol Policy 

USC Upstate enforces a strong alcohol policy in order 
to respect the academic environment and protect the wel- 
fare of individuals accessing the campus. The University 
complies with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities 
Act Amendment of 1989 in establishing and enforcing 
alcohol and drug policy. Consult the USC Upstate Student 
Handbook for a current copy of the Alcohol Policy. 



For Your Information 

* use Upstate English Fluency Grievance Policy: 

Students who feel that they are unable to understand the 
spoken and/or written English of an instructor at USC 
Upstate shall schedule a meeting with the dean of the 
respective school and make their concerns known. The 
dean will conduct an investigation and report to the 
complaining students his/her finding within ten working 
days of the complaint. In the event student charges are 
substantiated, the dean and the vice chancellor for aca- 
demic affairs will take immediate action to rectify the 
problem. Such action may take the form of replacement 
of the instructor immediately, intensive remediation of 
the problem, or any other solution that protects the due 
process rights of faculty and students. Refer questions to 
the Academic Affairs Office. 

• Policy for Non-Academic Grievances 

A grievance is defined as a dissatisfaction occur- 
ring when a student thinks that any condition affecting 
him/her is unjust, inequitable or creates an unnecessary 
hardship. Such grievances include, but are not limited to, 
the following problems: mistreatment by any university 
employee, wrongful assessment and processing of fees, 
records and registration errors, racial discrimination, sex 
discrimination, and discrimination based on handicaps, 
as they relate to nonacademic areas of the University. 
The grievance procedure shall not be used for appeals 



Student and Diversity Affairs 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



45 



of disciplinary decisions, residency classification deci- 
sions, traffic appeals decisions or any other type decision 
where a clearly defined appeals process has already been 
established. The procedure is as follows: 

The initial phase of the student grievance procedure 
requires an oral discussion between the student and the 
person(s) alleged to have caused the grievance. This 
discussion must take place within ten working days of 
the incident that constituted the grievance. 

If the student wishes to file an official grievance, a 
grievance form must be completed and filed with the im- 
mediate super\isor of the person alleged to have caused 
the grievance. The form must be filed with the person's 
immediate supervisor within five working days of the 
initial discussion referred to above. The supervisor shall 
immediately investigate the incident and render a deci- 
sion. If the student feels the grievance is resolved, the 
process is complete. 

If the grievance is unresolved, the student may bring 
the matter before the Grievance Committee by present- 
ing a written statement within ten working days of the 
supervisor's decision. 

The Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and Di- 
versity Affairs coordinates the grievance procedure for 
nonacademic areas and should be contacted for forms 
and assistance. 

• The Student Right-to-Know Act requires higher 
education institutions that receive federal funds to report 
graduation rates for students who enter the institutions 
as first-time, full-time degree-seeking students. In the 
case of four-year institutions, the rate is based on the 
number of those students who graduate within six years 
of enrolling. 

The graduation rate forfirst-time students who entered 
the University of South Carolina Upstate on a full-time 
basis in the fall of 1996 is 36.1%. 

The figure does not include students who transferred 
from other institutions and graduated from USC Upstate, 
or those who transferred from USC Upstate to other four- 
year institutions and graduated from them. 

The graduation rate is also atlected by students who 
change from full-time to part-time status, those who 
discontinue studies and later return, as well as those who 
drop out permanently. 



46 



Student and Diversity Affairs 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 




Academic Regulations 



As the chief governing body of the University of 
South Carolina, the board of tnistees delegates powers 
to the chancellor, the president, and the faculty in accord 
with its policies. Subject to the review of the chancellor, 
the president and the board of trustees, the faculty retains 
legislative powers in all matters pertaining to the standards 
of admission, registration, instruction, research and ex- 
tracurricular activities; the requirements for the granting 
of degrees earned in course; the curricula; the discipline 
of students; the educational policies and standards of the 
University; and all other matters affecting the conduct of 
academic affairs. 

The University reserves the right to make changes in 
curricula, degree requirements, course offerings, and all 
academic regulations, at any time when, in the judgment 
of the faculty, the chancellor, the president or the board 
of trustees, such changes are for the best interest of the 
students. 

The University assumes that students, through the act 
of registration, accept all published academic regulations 
appearing in this catalog, class schedule or in any other 
official announcement. 

Unforeseen circumstances may interfere with the 
scheduling of any particular course or degree offering. 
Students are expected to take such developments into ac- 
count as they arise, even if doing so means a delay in some 
of their academic goals or a modification of those goals. 
Each academic unit concerned works closely with students 
facing such problems in an effort to resolve them. Classes 
may be cancelled for extenuating circumstances such as 
insufficient enrollment. 

Rights of Catalog 

An undergraduate student may choose to obtain a degree 
in accordance with the curricularrequirements in forcewhen 
he or she first enrolls in the University or under subsequent 
requirements published while the student is enrolled. 

The following conditions apply to the selection of 
degree requirements: 

1 . A student has eight years continuous and 
inclusive to claim the requirements of a specific 
catalog. 

2. A student who is absent for more than five years 
must select the catalog in effect at the time of his 
or her return. 

3. The choice of requirements is restricted to a 
single bulletin. 

4. A student may not appeal to requirements 
adopted and abandoned while he or she was not 
enrolled in the University. 

A student who is absent from the University, for even 
a short time, may find that there have been drasfic changes 
in curricula and programs. In such cases, there may be no 
choice for the student but to adopt the new program or a 
transitional program approved by the dean. USC Upstate 
is not responsible for providing programs or courses that 
were deleted during the student's absence. 

Course of Study 

Students are expected to follow the program outlined by 
their college or school as closely as possible, particularly in 
the first two years when they are satisfying general educa- 



tion requirements and prerequisites for advanced work. 

Students must complete courses in the prescribed 
sequence. Failure to do so may lead to future schedule dif- 
ficulties, and students may find that the course for which 
they wish to enroll is not available. 

Course Substitutions 

Under unavoidable and exceptional circumstances, the 
faculty may pennit a substitution or an exemption from the 
ordinary processes to complete the prescribed curricula. 
Students requesting a deviation from the prescribed course 
of study should consult with their academic advisor before 
preparing a petition listing the substitutions or exemptions 
sought and the reasons for the requests. Petitions are sub- 
mitted on forms obtainable from the deans' offices or the 
Records Office. They must be returned to the dean of the 
school in which the student is enrolled. 

Any deviation from degree requirements as published 
in the catalog must have the approval of the dean of the 
student's major If the petition is denied, students may ap- 
peal to the executive vice chancellor for academic affairs. 
The petition must be approved before a student enrolls in 
the substitute course. 

Students transferring fi'om another col lege or university 
desiring to substitute courses taken elsewhere for courses 
prescribed at USC Upstate must submit a petition to the dean 
of the college or school in which they expect to receive a 
degree. 

Change of Major 

A student desiring to change his or her program of 
study is required to ( 1 ) obtain a change of major form from 
the current dean's office or from the Records Office, (2) 
have this form signed by the dean of the current college or 
school, (3) present the form for the approval of the dean 
of the college or school in which he or she plans to enroll 
along with a copy of the academic record obtained from 
the office of the former dean, and (4) return the completed 
form to the Records Office for processing. A change of 
major should be completed in advance of registration. 
Students are responsible for keeping their intended major 
current and accurate by processing a change of major when 
necessary. 

Change of Name 

A student wishing a name change must present to 
the Records Office proper legal documentation such as a 
marriage license, a court order approving a name change, 
or a divorce decree in which a name change is granted. 

Change of Address 

Students are obligated to notify the Records Office 
of any change of address and/or phone number Failure to 
do so can cause serious delay in the handling of student 
records and notification of emergencies at home. Students 
change their address by using VIR Returned mail due to 
an incorrect address will result in a "hold" being placed 
on a student's record, preventing registration. 

Indebtedness 

A student who is indebted to the university may be 
prohibited from attending class, taking final examinations, 
or registering for future terms. Indebtedness to the Uni- 
versity may also prevent conferring of a degree, issuance 



48 



Academic Regulations 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



of a diploma, or issuance of a transcript. 

Students who hiave a repayment obligation for federal 
or state grant or loan funds (Pell Grant, Perkins Loan, 
SEOG, Supplemental Loan for Students or Stafford Loan) 
are not permitted to receive federal, state or institutional 
financial aid. 

Change of Campus Within USC System 

Students wishing to change campuses within the 
University of South Carolina system may initiate the 
process in the Records Office. Eligibility is determined 
by the campus and major to which the student wishes to 
transfer, is based on hours earned and GPA. Students are 
responsible for meeting all requirements and deadlines. 

Registration 

Official enrollment in the University requires that 
students be academically eligible, complete the registra- 
tion process, and have made payment of current academic 
fees. 

Students are expected to complete registration (in- 
cluding the payment of all required fees and having an 
ID card made or validated) on the dates prescribed in the 
university calendar Failure to pay fees by the published 
deadlines may result in cancellation of the student's class 
schedule. To receive credit for a course at the end of the 
semester, students must be officially enrolled prior to the 
last day of late registration. 

Academic Advisement 

The purpose of academic advising is to facilitate stu- 
dents' progression in meeting educational goals. Students 
are assigned a faculty advisor early in their first semester 
of attendance. 

Academic advising is a joint venture between the 
faculty advisor and the student. The faculty responsibili- 
ties include knowledge of the curriculum, of institutional 
policies, and of services available on campus. Faculty 
members assist students in developing an educational 
plan including selection of courses, scheduling classes 
and evaluating progress toward the degree. 

Students are responsible for making educational deci- 
sions, scheduling advisement appointments and initiating 
discussions concerning academic difficulty or changes in 
their plan of study. Students should read all university 
literature and meet published deadlines. 

A scheduled advisement period is held during fall 
and spring semester the week before priority registration. 
Students are required to meet with an advisor prior to their 
registration appointment time. After advisement, a "hold" 
is lifted allowing the student to register through the web 
registration system. 

Advisement Testing 

New ft-eshmen must take advisement tests in math- 
ematics and foreign language. Anyone who does not 
receive transfer credit for English 101 or foreign language 
must take advisement tests in these areas. Those who have 
not completed the math requirement for their USC Upstate 
major must take a placement test in math. Refer to the 
foreign language placement policy on page 62. 

Course Load 

Graduation from USC Upstate in four years assumes 



completing 30 semester hours of course work per year that 
can be applied to the degree program. Changing majors, 
repeating courses, or enrolling in less hours will delay 
graduation past four years. 

A student may enroll in no more than eighteen 
hours during a fall or spring semester, three hours during 
Maymester, or six hours during a single summer session 
(seven hours if one course is a four-hour course) without 
permission of his or her dean. Permission will not be 
granted for enrollment in more than twenty-one hours in 
fall and spring semesters. In order to receive permission 
for an overload, a student must have an overall GPA of 
3.0 or a 3.0 GPA on twelve or more hours for the previous 
semester. Forms to request permission for an overload are 
available in the deans office and the Records Office. 

Semester Hours Enrollment: 

Fall and Spring Semesters 

Semester Hours 

1-11 Part-time status 

12 Full-time status/graduate in 5 years 

15-18 Full-time status/possible to graduate in 4 years 

1 9-2 1 Must have permission to overload 

Over 21 Not Permitted 



Summer 

Tenn Part Time 
Maymester 1 -2 

Summer I and 11 1-5 



Full Time Overload 
3 over 3 

6-7 over 7 



Independent Study 

A student who wishes to enroll in an independent 
study course may do so by engaging a supervising fac- 
ulty member, completing a contract in association with 
that faculty member, securing approval of the dean, and 
registering in the Records Office. Independent studies 
forms should be completed no later than the first week of 
the semester 

Internship 

A student who wishes to enroll in an internship may do 
so by engaging a supervising faculty member, completing 
a contract in association with that faculty member, secur- 
ing approval of the dean, and registering in the Records 
Office. Internship forms should be completed no later 
than the first week of the semester in which the student is 
interning. 

Auditing 

Auditing a course means attending classes and listen- 
ing without actively participating in the class. Students 
must meet course prerequisites. The auditor is not respon- 
sible for class assignments or examinations. No academic 
credit is earned for a course which is audited nor may it 
be earned later through examination. A student who has 
audited a course is not prohibited from taking the course 
later for credit. 

A student who wishes to audit a course must be 
admitted to the University and enroll in the course as an 
auditor However, students taking the class for credit are 
given preference over auditors where enrollment limits 
are a concern. 

A student who is auditing a course, but who wishes to 



Academic Regulations 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



49 



take the course for credit, may change his or her registra- 
tion by the end of the late registration period. 

Students wishing to audit a course or to change from 
credit to audit may do so only with permission of the in- 
structor. Each instnictor may set attendance conditions 
for the audit. Students not meeting those conditions will 
be withdrawn from the audit after the semester ends, with 
the withdrawal date listed on their transcript 

1. Students who wish to audit or change from 
credit to audit should get an Audit fonn from 
the Records Office. 

2. The form must be signed by the professor with 
any limiting attendance conditions specified. 

3. The form is then signed by the student's advisor 
and turned into the Records Office. The last day 
to change credit to audit is the same day as the last 
day to withdraw without academic penalty. 

At the end of the semester when the faculty submit 
grades, any student who has not met the conditions of the 
audit as reported by the faculty member will be withdrawn. 
Faculty will submit a Withdrawn from Audit form. 

Pass-Fail Option 

A student who has a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 
and who wishes to investigate fields of study other than 
those required by his or her degree program may choose 
the pass-fail option. The pass-fail option applies only to 
elective courses. No more than eight courses may be taken 
on a pass-fail basis during a student's academic career 
(excluded are credits granted for AP, CLEP, or ACT PEP). 
The option is offered on all courses at the undergraduate 
level, and normal prerequisites may be waived on these 
courses. 

Enrollment for a course under the pass-fail option 
requires approval of the dean in the student's major. The 
option must be elected or revoked no later than the last 
day to withdraw without academic penalty. 

Courses taken on a pass-fail basis do not count in 
the student's GPA nor toward the hours required for the 
Chancellor's or Dean's honor lists. 

Repetition of Courses 

Grades earned in a repeated course appear on the 
transcript and are calculated in the GPA (see Grade For- 
giveness Policy). Students may receive transient credit 
for courses previously attempted at USC Upstate. (See 
transient credit policy). 

Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate 
Courses (Senior Privilege) 

An undergraduate senior in his or her final semester 
may enroll in graduate courses under the following condi- 
tions: 

1. The student has a cumulative GPA of 3.0. 

2. The graduate course(s) do not create an 
overload. 

3. Courses for graduate credit are not be used to 
meet undergraduate degree requirements. 

Summer Sessions 

Summer sessions normally consist of a three-week 
term ( Maymester) and two four and one-half-week terms. 
Students regularly enrolled in the University may take work 



applicable to the degree during the summer session. 

The maximum course load pennitted in the Maymester 
is three semester hours. Six semester hours per term are 
permitted in the four and one-half-week sessions. A single 
extra hour may be carried if one of the courses involved 
is a four-hour course. 

The University reserves the right to cancel any course 
in the case of inadequate enrollment. Registration in any 
course may be closed when the maximum enrollment for 
effective learning is reached. 

Changes in Registration 

A change in registration involves adding a course, 
dropping a course, withdrawing from a course, changing 
from one course section to another, changing the number 
of credits in a variable credit course, or changing course 
registration from audit to credit. Any change in registration 
must be filed with the Records Office on the proper form 
with all required signatures by the published deadlines. 

Any change involving adding a course, dropping a 
course, changing a section, changing the number of cred- 
its in a variable credit course, or changing from audit to 
credit must be completed by the end of late registration 
as published in the university calendar. Students may 
elect or revoke the pass-fail option no later than the last 
day to withdraw without penalty. Students are urged to 
consult with the academic unit in which they are enrolled 
concerning any change of registration. 

With the permission of both instructors, students may 
make the following schedule changes during the first few 
weeks of the semester (assuming the availability of the 
course to which the student desires to move): 
Biology 101 to/from 110 
Chemistry 105 or 1 1 1 to/from 101 
French, German, and Spanish 101 to/from 
102, 102 to/from 201, 201 to/from 202 or 2 1 0, 
202 or 210 to/from 310 
Mathematics 120 to/from 121, 121 to/from 
141,126 to/from 141, 127 to/from 141 

Adding a Course, Dropping a Course, and 
Section Changes 

Students may add a course, drop a course, or make 
a section change through the last day of late registration 
by following the instructions published in the schedule 
of courses. Courses dropped during the late registration 
period are not recorded on the permanent record and are 
not entered into the computation of hours attempted, grade 
point average, or any other totals. Students should discuss 
these matters with their advisor and obtain the appropriate 
signatures. 

Course Withdrawal 

Through Last Day to Withdraw Without Penalty. 

Course withdrawal is allowed after late registration and 
up through the last day to withdraw without academic 
penalty (the last day of the tenth week of the semester) by 
( 1 ) completion of the Course Withdrawal Form available 
from the Records Office; (2) discussing the matter with 
the academic advisor and instructor, and having them sign 
the form; and (3) returning the form to the Records Of- 
fice. Course withdrawals during this period are recorded 



SO 



Academic Regulations 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



as a W (withdrawn) on students" transcripts but are not 
entered into the computation of hours attempted, grade 
point average, or any other totals. In summer sessions 
and other shortened tenns, the time allowed to withdraw 
from a course without academic penalty is equal to ap- 
proximately 72 percent of the total number of class days 
from the beginning of the term. Students should check the 
University's academic calendar for the prescribed date in 
each semester or term. 

Following Last Day to Withdraw Without Penalt>'. 
A grade of WF (withdrawn failing) normally is recorded 
for any course from which a student withdraws after the 
last day to withdraw without penalty. A WF is treated the 
same as an F in the calculation of a students' grade point 
average and in the evaluation of probation and suspension 
conditions. In certain exceptional cases, a grade of WF 
may be changed to a W, assuming the student withdraws 
under extenuating circumstances or for medical reasons 
and that the student is passing the course at the time of 
withdrawal. Requests to have the grade of WF changed 
to W are initiated by the student with the dean of their 
major where the necessary procedures are explained 
and the student is supplied the form entitled Request for 
Assignment of W Grade for Medical Reason or Extenu- 
ating Circumstances After Penalty Date. This form and 
supporting documentation concerning the extenuating 
circumstances are presented to and discussed with the 
student's major dean. Upon concurrence of the dean, the 
student submits the fonn and documentation to the ap- 
propriate instructor(s) for a grade assignment. (The dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences serves as major dean 
for those students who have not declared a major.) Stu- 
dents return the form completed and signed to the Records 
Office no later than the last day of class for the semester 
(before final examinations for the semester begin). 

Withdrawal from the University 

Students wishing to withdraw officially from the 
University should obtain the form entitled Request for 
Semester Withdrawal from the Records Office. Students 
are responsible for completing an exit interview with the 
dean of their major, obtaining the required signatures, 
and returning the form to the Records Office for final ac- 
tion. Students who stop attending the University without 
following the withdrawal procedure will receive an F for 
each course which may prejudice any future attempt to 
reenter the University. 

Students withdrawing from the University prior to the 
last day to withdraw without penalty have the withdrawal 
date and the courses posted on their transcript with a grade 
ofW. 

Students withdrawing after the last day to withdraw 
without penalty, but not later than the last day of class, 
receive a grade of WF for each course in which they were 
enrolled. Students may petition to receive a grade of W 
rather than WF by carrying out the procedures outlined 
under the section entitled "Course Withdrawal : Following 
the Last Day to Withdraw Without Penalty." Students who 
stop attending classes and fail to carry out the procedures 
for dropping or withdrawing from their courses will have 
final grades calculated on both completed and missed 



work. This typically results in a grade of F. 

Post-Semester Withdrawal (Retroactive). A stu- 
dent who ceases attending classes due to medical or other 
extenuating circumstances so serious that the student 
was neither able to attend classes nor initiate withdrawal 
procedures, may request to have each final grade changed 
to a W to indicate that there was satisfactory performance 
before being forced to stop attending classes. Normally, 
an appeal to change a final grade is considered only if 
initiated within one year after the final grade is assigned. 
Withdrawal must be from all courses. 

Requests for post-semester withdrawal are initiated 
in the Records Office, where the necessary procedures 
are explained and the student is supplied with the form 
entitled Request for Withdrawal After the Penalty Date 
for Medical Reason or Extenuating Circumstances. This 
form and supporting documentation concerning the ex- 
tenuating circumstances are presented to the dean of the 
student's major, who will make a determination as to the 
nature of the circumstances and the dates during which 
the student was unable to participate in classes. The 
dean makes a recommendation as to whether the student 
should be permitted a post-semester withdrawal from the 
University based on the findings of an investigation of the 
facts. The recommendation of the dean will be sent to the 
registrar, who will then forward the recommendation to 
the faculty member(s) for assignment of a final grade of 
W or WF. The final grade will be based upon the student's 
academic standing at the time of the initiation of the ex- 
tenuating circumstances. If the instructor is no longer at 
use Upstate, and a forwarding address is available, the 
student shall, within the time specified on the extenuat- 
ing circumstances form, transmit copies of all necessary 
materials to the former faculty member by certified return 
receipt mail. If the instnictor fails to assign a W or WF 
within three months of the date of the request, or if no 
forwarding address is available, the dean of the appropri- 
ate college or school shall appoint a faculty member to 
consider the request and assign a W or WF. 

The decision of the dean of the student's major con- 
cerning being allowed a post-semester withdrawal from 
the University or the assignment of a final grade by the 
faculty member(s) may be appealed as follows: (1) To 
appeal the decision of the dean of the student's major, 
the student requests that the Executive Academic Affairs 
Committee review the facts of the case. The decision of 
this committee will be final. (2) To appeal the assignment 
of a grade of WF, the student will follow the procedure 
described in the catalog section entitled "Academic 
Grievances." 

Class Attendance 

The resources of the University are provided for the 
intellectual growth and development of the students who 
attend. The schedule of courses is provided to facilitate an 
orderly arrangement of the program of instruction. The fact 
that classes are scheduled is evidence that attendance is 
important and students should, therefore, maintain regular 
attendance if they are to attain maximum success in the 
pursuit of their studies. 

All instructors will, at the beginning of each semester, 
make a clear written statement to all their classes regarding 



Academic Regulations 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



51 



their policies concerning attendance. Instructors are also 
responsible for counseling with their students regarding 
the academic consequences of absences from their classes 
or laboratories. Students are obligated to adhere to the 
requirements of each course and of each instructor. All 
matters related to the student's absence, including the pos- 
sible make-up of work missed, are to be arranged between 
the student and the instructor. Students should understand 
that they are responsible for all course content covered 
during their absences and for the academic consequences 
of their absences. 

Examinations 

Final Examinations 

Final examinations are scheduled at the end of each 
semester and term. A calendar of examination times is 
published in the Schedule of Course Offerings. All final 
examinations must be administered during the time period 
designated in the calendar of examination times. Instruc- 
tors may allow students to switch from one examination 
section to another when that instructor teaches multiple 
sections of the same course. Exceptions from this policy 
should be addressed to the Executive Vice Chancellor for 
academic affairs. 

Laboratory examinations are normally scheduled 
during the last meeting of the lab. 

A student who is absent from a final examination will 
receive a grade of F in the course if an excuse acceptable 
to the instructor is not offered. When the instructor excuses 
an absence from the examination, a grade of 1 (incomplete) 
is awarded until the examination is made up. Please see 
the section on incompletes on page 55. A student who is 
excused must take the examination at the convenience of 
the instructor. In any case, the examination must be made 
up within one year. 

Reexamination or the assignment of additional 
work for the purpose of removing an F or for raising 
a grade is not permitted. 

Tests 

Faculty are restricted in the scheduling of tests only 
during the final week of classes of a regular semester. 
Restrictions are as follows: 
Class Meetings 

Testing Restrictions 



1 

2 
3 
4 or more 



No testing during the last class meeting 
No testing during the last 2 class meetings 
No testing during the last 2 class meetings 
No testing during the last 3 class meetings 
These restrictions do not apply to laboratory examina- 
tions which may be administered during the last week of 
classes. 

Academic Standing 

All students enrolled at USC Upstate are subject to 
the same continuation standards. Administration of these 
regulations is the responsibility of the Executive Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and is coordinated by 
the registrar's office. Students seeking relief from these 
regulations must go through the appeal process (see Aca- 
demic Suspension Appeal Process). 



The following standards regarding scholastic eligibil- 
ity are applicable to all undergraduate students. 

Continuation Standards 

Academic probation. The academic record of every 
student is reviewed at the end of the fall semester, the end 
of the spring semester, and at the end of the final summer 
session. Students who do not meet the following cumulative 
GPA standards will be placed on academic probation: 
24 to 44 grade hours — a minimum cumulative GPA of 

1 .50 is required 
45 to 59 grade hours — a minimum cumulative GPA of 

1.75 is required 
60 or more grade hours — a minimum cumulative GPA 

of 2.00 is required 

A student who has been placed on academic proba- 
tion must achieve a minimum GPA standard on courses 
attempted after being placed on probation. The GPA 
standard required of students who have been placed on 
academic probation is as follows: 

0-11 grade hours — no minimum GPA required 
1 2 or more grade hours — a minimum GPA of 
2.00 is required 
Academic probation may be removed in the following way: 

1 . Attempt 1 2 or more grade hours while on 
probation, and 

2. Attain a minimum cumulative GPA that 
meets the above GPA standards. 

Students who leave the University without completing 
a term of probation, and are absent for thee (3) or more 
years, will begin a new term of probation upon readmis- 
sion. 

Academic suspension. A student who has been placed 
on academic probation but does not achieve the required 
minimum GPA standard will be placed on academic sus- 
pension. There are three levels of academic suspension. 

Level Length of suspension How suspension may be removed 

First 2 major semesters 1 . Attend summer school at 

USC Upstate, enroll in at least nine 
grade hours, and achieve a 
minimum grade of "C" on all 
courses attempted, or 

2. Successful appeal through 
the suspension appeal 
process, or 

3. Serve the suspension 

Second 4 major semesters 1 . Successful appeal through 
the suspension appeal 
process, or 
2. Serve the suspension. 

Third Indefinite 

A Student who is serving a second suspension may 
attend summer school at USC Upstate. Grades earned in 
summer school may provide evidence of fitness for removal 
of the second suspension through the appeal process. 

A student who has a third (indefinite) suspension may 
not enroll in classes at USC Upstate. 

Suspended students will not be admitted or allowed 



52 



Academic Regulations 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



to continue any program of the university for credit or 
GPA purposes. Grades based on credits earned at other 
institutions while under suspension will not be used to 
remove the suspension. See suspension appeal process. 
Academic Suspension Appeal Process 
Students wishing to appeal academic suspension 
should contact the Records Office to obtain an appeal 
form. Completed forms must be submitted to the Records 
Office to be considered. 

1 . The Admissions and Petitions Committee may 
grant students relief from academic suspension 
only in extraordinary circumstances. 

2. Decisions of the Admissions and Petitions 
Committee may be appealed to the Executive 
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. 

Returning to the University. A student who reenters 
the University after having been suspended will begin a 
new term of probation. The conditions of that academic 
probation are those listed above. Students who have been 
granted relief through the suspension appeal process may 
have additional conditions imposed on them. Students 
will be notified of any additional conditions by letter. 

When a student is granted relief from academic 
suspension through the appeal process, the suspension 
is not removed from the permanent record, but continues 
to appear on the record and to count as one of the three 
academic suspensions a student is allowed. 

Academic Grievances 

The University of South Carolina Upstate is committed 
to the judicious, fair and impartial resolution of conflicts 
which arise between an instructor and a student and of 
petitions from students who seek relief from university 
regulations related to their academic work. The process 
is designed to provide an objective review of student 
complaints regarding academic grievances, including 
acceptance into a program ( for example, nursing or educa- 
tion), transfer credit, grades and other academic policies. 
Copies of the Academic Grievance Policy and the appeal 
form are available in the Records Office. Instructors are 
not bound by the grade appeal recommendations. Students 
wishing to appeal academic suspension should follow 
the procedure under "Academic Suspension Appeals 
Process." 

Transfer Credit 

Students wishing to transfer to USC Upstate should 
refer to the admissions section on page 1 7 of this catalog. 
All official transcripts must be sent directly to USC Upstate 
from each institution the student has attended, including 
summers, transient or concurrent enrollment, whether or 
not the credit is earned or applies to the degree sought. 
All work will be used in the calculation of the collegiate 
GPA. 

Transient Credit 

Degree-seeking students at USC Upstate are expected 
to follow the progression of courses described in their 
program of study, which builds academic skills through 
course sequencing. Students enrolled as degree-seeking 
candidates will receive a degree from USC Upstate and 
thus are expected to complete course work at USC Up- 



state. Continuing students are permitted to take courses at 
other institutions; however, not all courses offered at other 
colleges and universities are transferable and some may 
not count toward a student's degree program. Students 
seeking transfer credit must complete the following prior 
to enrollment: 

Obtain a Transient Credit from a division office, dean's 
office or the Records Office; 

Obtain approval signatures from the student's advisor 
and dean on the Transient Credit Form; and 

Submit the completed Transient Credit Form to the 
Records Office. 

To obtain transient credit for a course completed at another 
institution, students must: 

Earn a minimum course grade of C for courses com- 
pleted at all non-USC system schools; and 

Request an official transcript from the transient in- 
stitution be sent to the USC Upstate Records Office. 

As noted in the residency policy, the last twenty-five 
per cent of the semester hours of the degree program must 
be completed in residence at USC Upstate. All grades 
earned in courses taken at other colleges or universities 
will count in the student's combined GPA. 

Credit by Examination, Military Credit, 
and Credit for Non-collegiate Programs 

Students with a strong background in a variety of 
basic subjects may be able to exempt courses and receive 
credit hours for courses based on their scores on Advanced 
Placement ( AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), College 
Level Examination Program (CLEP), American College 
Testing Proficiency Examination Program (ACT PEP), 
Defense Activity forNontraditional Educational Support 
(DANTES ), or by successfully passing a course challenge 
examination prepared at USC Upstate. Students may also 
seek credit for military schooling or training offered by 
certain non-collegiate organizations. Normally, a maximum 
of 30 semester hours earned in any combination of cor- 
respondence courses, AP, IB, CLEP, ACT PEP, DANTES, 
USC Upstate institutional credit by examination, military 
and other service schools, educational programs of non- 
collegiate organizations, off-campus extension classes, or 
while classified as a special student are accepted as partial 
fulfillment of the requirements for the baccalaureate. Ex- 
ceptions to this 30-hour rule may be made at the discretion 
of the dean of the appropriate college or school. Students 
planning to pursue work at other institutions or planning 
to take correspondence courses or off-campus extension 
classes must complete this work before attaining senior 
classification (see academic residency requirements.) 

AP, IB, CLEP, ACT PEP, DANTES, and USC Up- 
state institutional credit by examination do not enter into 
calculation of students" GPA. 

USC Upstate accepts many, but not all, AP, IB, CLEP 
and ACT PEP, and DANTES subjects. Transfer students 
with AP, IB, CLEP , ACT PER or DANTES credits in 
subjects not listed below must submit those credits to the 
dean of the appropriate school for review. Students are not 
allowed to earn CLER ACT PER DANTES and/or USC 
Upstate institutional credit by examination for courses in 
which they have been previously enrolled either regularly 
or as an auditor. 



Academic Regulations 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



53 



Advanced Placement (AP) 

All Adxanced Placement courses and tests are ad- 
ministered by high schools and should be completed 
successfully before entering USC Upstate. An entering 
student who has passed 30 hours of AP credit may be 
granted sophomore standing upon enrollment. 

In order to receive credit for courses, students must 
have an original AP score report sent directly to the USC 
Upstate Records Office. 

The Advanced Placement courses accepted by USC 
Upstate are: 

Government & Politics: United States: Three credits 
for Government and International Studies 201 with a 
minimum score of 3. 

Art Histoiy: Three credits for Art History 101 with a 
minimum score of 3. 

Studio Art: Drawing: Three credits for Art Studio 1 1 
with a minimum score of 3. 

Studio Art: 2-D Design: Three credits for An Studio 
103 with a minimum score of 3. 

Studio Art: 3-D Design: Three credits for Art 104 
with a minimum score of 3. 

Biology: Eight credits for Biology 101 and 102. 
including laboratory credit, with a minimum score of 3. 

Chemistiy: Four credits for Chemistry 1 1 1 with a 
score of 3; eight credits for Chemistry 1 1 1 and 1 12 with 
a score of 4 or 5. 

Chinese Language & Culture ov Japanese Language & 
Culture: Eight hours of university credit with a minimum 
score of 3. 

Government & Politics: Comparative: Three credits 
for Government and International Studies 320 with a 
minimum score of 3. 

Computer Science A: Three credits in Computer Sci- 
ence with a minimum score of 3. 

Computer Science AB: Three credits in Computer 
Science with a minimum score of 3. 

English Language and Composition and English 
Literature and Composition: Three credits for English 

101 with a score of 3 or 4 on either English AP exam. 
Three credits for English 1 1 and three credits for English 

102 with a minimum score of 3 or 4 on both English AP 
examinations. Three credits for English 101 and three 
credits for English 102 with a minimum score of 5 on 
either or both English AP examinations. 

Environmental Science: Fourcredit{3 hoursofSBIO 
270, Environmental Science, and 1 hour of SBIO 270L, 
Environmental Science Lab) with a score of 3 or better. 

European Histoiy: Three credits selected for History 
1 1 1 with a score of 3. 

Erench. German, Italian and Spanish: Six credits for 

101 and 102 level courses with a score of 3 or 4. Nine 
credits for 101, 102 and 201 with a score of 5. 

French Literature: Six credits for French 101 and 

102 with a score of 3. Nine credits for French 101, 102 
and 20 1 with a score of 4. Twelve credits for French 101. 
102, 201 and 202 with a score of 5. 

Hitman Geography: Three hours of lower-level ge- 
ography credit with a minimum score of 3. 



Latin- Vergil and Latin Literature: Four hours of uni- 
versity credit with a minimum score of 3 for each test. 

Macroeconomics: Three credits for Economics 221 
with a minimum score of 3. 

Calculus AB: Six credits for Mathematics 143 and 
Mathematics 144 with a score of at least 3. 

Calculus EC: Six credits for Mathematics 143 and 
144 with a score of at least 3. 

Microeconomics: Three credits for Econoinics 222 
with a minimum score of 3. 

Music Theoiy: Three hours of university credit with 
a minimum score of 3. 

Physics B: Four credits for Physics 201 with a score 
of 3: eight credits for Physics 201 and 202 with a score 
of4or 5. 

Physics C: Mechanical: Four credits for Physics 2 1 1 
with a minimum score of 3. 

Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism: Four credits 
for Physics 212 with a minimum score of 3. 

Psychology: Three credits for Psychology 1 1 with 
a minimum score of 3. 

Spanish Literature: Three credits for Spanish 202 
with a score of 3, 4 or 5. 

Statistics: Three credits for Economics 291, Mathemat- 
ics 102 or Sociology 201 with a minimum score of 3. 

United States History: Three credits for History 1 10 
with a score of 3 

World Histoiy: Three hours of lower-level history 
credit with a minimum score of 3. 

International Baccalaureate (IB) 

The University of South Carolina Upstate recognizes 
the academic rigor of the International Baccalaureate (IB) 
Diploma Program. Students may be awarded college 
credit for completion of higher-level IB examinations, 
as determined by the appropriate academic schools or 
divisions. All International Baccalaureate (IB) courses 
and examinations are administered by high schools and 
should be completed successfully before entering USC 
Upstate. 

In order to receive credit for higher-level IB examina- 
tion scores, students must ask that official IB examination 
results be sent directly to the USC Upstate Records Office. 
Minimum scores for awarding credit for IB examinations 
are determined by academic units responsible for course 
content. 

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

Credit for subjects in which students are knowledge- 
able, but have no class standing, can be gained through 
successful completion of the College Entrance Examination 
Board CLEP tests. 

Credit earned in CLEP may be applied to any program 
where the course nonnally would be accepted as earned 
credit. CLEP credit is not granted for courses that have 
been failed previously, nor does CLEP credit raise a grade 
earned previously in any course. Repeat examinations are 
not allowed. USC Upstate does not give credit for the 
CLEP general examination. 

The CLEP examinations accepted by USC Upstate are: 

American Government: Three credits forGovemment 



54 



Academic Regulations 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



and International Studies 20 1 with a satisfactory essay and 
minimum score of 50 on the objective section. 

American Literature: Three credits for English 279 
or 280 with satisfactory completion of the essay section 
and a minimum score of 46 on the objective section. 

Analysis and Interpretation of Literature: Three credits 
for English 102 with a satisfactory essay and a minimum 
score of 49. Credit is given after completion of English 
101 with a C or higher. If CLEP examinations for both 
Composition and Literature are successfully completed, 
six hours of credit for English 101 and 102 are awarded 
upon passing any 300 or higher level English with a grade 
of C or better. 

Biology-: Eight credits for Biology 101 and 102, 
including laboratory credit with a minimum score of 50. 

Introductoiy Business Lav,-: Three credits for Business 
Administration 347 with a minimum score of 51. 

Calculus: Three credits for Mathematics 141 and 
three credits for Mathematics 144 with a minimum score 
of 47. 

Chemistiy: Four credits for Chemistry 1 1 1 with a 
minimum score of 50. 

College Algebra: Three credits for Mathematics 126 
with a minimum score of 45. 

College Algebra/Trigonometty: Three credits for 
Mathematics 126 and 3 credits for Mathematics 127 with 
a minimum score of 45. 

College Composition: Three credits for English 101 
with a satisfactory essay and a minimum score of 48 on 
the objective section. Credit is awarded after completion 
of English 102 with a grade of C of better. 

Financial Accounting: Three credits for Business 
Administration 225 with a minimum score of 47; 6 credits 
for Business Administration 225 and 226 with a minimum 
score of 55. 

Principles of Management: Three credits for Business 
Administration 371 with a minimum score of 47. 

Principles of Marketing: Three credits for Business 
Administration 350 with a minimum score of 50. 

Introductoiy Sociology: Three credits for Sociology 
101 with a minimum score of 50. 

Principles of Macroeconomics: Three credits for 
Economics 221 with successful completion of the essay 
section and a minimum score of 48 on the objective sec- 
tion. 

Principles of Microeconomics: Three credits for 
Economics 222 with successful completion of the essay 
section and a minimum score of 47 on the objective sec- 
tion. 

Micro/Macroeconomics: Six credits for Economics 
22 1 and 222 with successftil completion of the essay section 
and a minimum score of 47 on the objective section. 

Money and Banking: Three credits for Economics 
301 with a minimum score of 50. 

Introductoiy Psychology: Three credits for Psychol- 
ogy 101 with a minimum score of 50. 

Statistics: Three credits for Economics 291 with a 
minimum score of 49. 

Trigonometiy: Three credits for Mathematics 127 
with a minimum score of 50. 



American College Testing Program 
(ACT/PEP) 

Credit for subjects in which students are knowledge- 
able, but have no college credit, can be gained through 
successfiil completion of the PEP tests. USC Upstate 
students may earn up to 30 semester hours via PEP. Those 
attempting PEP must rank in the 70th percentile of the 
scored population taking the examinations. Students wish- 
ing to take a PEP test should notify their faculty advisor 
of their intention to take the test. 

The specific ACT/PEP exams are currently under 
review. Students may contact the Records Office or their 
dean for a current list of acceptable tests. 

Defense Activity for Nontraditional 

Education Support (DANTES) 

Credit for subjects in which students are knowl- 
edgeable, but have no class standing, can be gained 
through successful completion of the Defense Activity 
for Nontraditional Education Support (DANTES) tests. 
The DANTES Program is a testing service conducted 
by Thompson Prometric for DANTES. an agency of the 
Department of Defense. 

Credit earned in DANTES may be applied to any 
program where the course normally would be accepted as 
earned credit. DANTES credit is not granted for courses 
that have been fai led previously, nor does DANTES credit 
raise a grade earned previously in any course. Repeat 
examinations are not allowed. Students wishing to take 
DANTES tests should contact counseling services for the 
necessary applications and notify their faculty advisor of 
their intention to take the test. 

The DANTES examination accepted by USC Upstate is: 

Developmental Psychology: Three credits for Psy- 
chology 302 with a minimum scaled score of 46. 

Institutional Credit by Examination 

Students enrolled in the University may obtain credit 
by examination for courses in which they have had no class 
attendance or semester standing. However, permission 
must be obtained from the dean of the college or school 
involved. A grade of not less than B on the examination 
is necessary to receive credit for the course. Examinations 
are not permitted in courses in which students previously 
have enrolled either regularly or as an auditor. Before the 
examination, applicants must pay the Cashier's Office a 
fee of $15 per semester hour. This fee is non-refijndable. 
The Records Office issues a receipt which must be shown 
to the dean of the college or school conducting the exami- 
nation. The dean immediately reports the results of the 
examination to the Records Office. Credits earned under 
this regulation are recorded only as hours earned. 

Military Service School Credit 

Following enrollment, a student may obtain credit 
for experiences in the armed services. In order to receive 
credit the student must have a DD 214 and/or DD 295 
and Certificates of Completion. Students who feel they 
qualify should contact the Records Office. 

Following a review by the Records Office using A 
Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in 
the Armed Services, a recommendation for credit is made 



Academic Regulations 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



55 



to the dean of the student's major area. The final decision 
as to the credit awarded is made by the dean of the school 
in which the student is enrolled. 

Credit for Non-collegiate Programs 

use Upstate will consider credit awarded for non- 
collegiate educational programs as recommended by 
the American Council on Education. Documentation is 
required. Final determination is made by the dean of the 
college or school in which the student is enrolled. 

Correspondence Course Credit 

use Upstate students may receive credit for corre- 
spondence courses taken concurrently with their regular 
academic work. Students must request permission to enroll 
in such courses on a form available in the Records Office. 
Enrollment must be approved in advance by the dean of 
the college or school in which the student is enrolled. 

Information concerning correspondence courses 
available from the University of South Carolina may be 
obtained from the Records Office. A minimum grade of 
C is required in order for correspondence courses to be 
counted in a student's degree program. 

Grading System 

Grade Symbols 

The grading system outlined below is in effect for all 
students at the University. Under this system, undergradu- 
ate course credit is granted only for earned grades of A, 
B+, B, C+, C, D+, D or S. Any of the following symbols 
(except NR) become a permanent part of students'academic 
records when assigned. 

A, B, C, D and F carry the traditional academic con- 
notations of excellent, good, average, poor and failing 
performance, respectively. 

S and U indicate, respectively, satisfactory (passing) 
and unsatisfactory (failing) performance in courses carried 
on a pass-fail basis, as indicated in the course description, 
or in courses for which the pass-fail option is elected 
under the conditions detailed in the section entitled Pass- 
Fail Option. The grades of S and U do not enter into the 
calculation of the GPA nor are they used in evaluation for 
probation or suspension. 

W is assigned for withdrawals after late registration 
but on or before the last day to withdraw without penalty. 
W may be assigned, in exceptional cases, to indicate 
satisfactory performance in courses from which students 
withdraw after the last day to withdraw without penalty. 
The grade is used primarily in cases of withdrawal from 
the University or course withdrawal for medical reasons 
or other extenuating circumstances. See the catalog sec- 
tion on "Changes of Registration" for an explanation of 
the procedures necessary for the assignment of this grade. 
A grade of W is not used in the evaluation of probation or 
suspension conditions and GPA computation. 

WF is assigned for withdrawal from a course after 
the last day to withdraw without penalty and is treated 
as F in the computation of GPA and in the evaluation of 
probation and suspension conditions. 

"I," incomplete, is assigned at the discretion of the 
instructor when, in the faculty member's judgment, a 
student is faced with a significant disruption in his or her 



ability to complete some portion of the assigned work in 
a course. The grade of "I" cannot be used to give students 
additional time to complete course assignments unless there 
is strong, clear evidence that stated conditions or events 
prevented the student from submitting course assignments 
when they were due. The faculty member must transmit 
the prescribed on-line "Incomplete Justification Form" 
as part of grade submission. The student can access this 
information on VIP. By arrangement with the instructor and 
according to the conditions on the required form entered 
by the instructor, the student may have from one week up 
to 12 months from the date the "I" was given — in no case 
can this be longer than 1 2 months — to complete and submit 
the work. It is the responsibility of the student to ensure 
all arrangements for removal of the "Incomplete" have 
been made and that all work to rectify the "Incomplete" 
has been accomplished. If the instuctor of record is no 
longer at USC Upstate, the student should, within the time 
specified on the incomplete grade fomi, transmit copies of 
all necessary materials to that instructor by certified return 
receipt mail. If the instructor fails to assign a grade within 
three months of the date of the request, if no forwarding 
address is available, the dean of the appropriate school or 
chair of the appropriate department/division shall appoint a 
faculty member to consider the request and assign a grade. 
When all required work has been completed and received, 
the instructor may initiate the appropriate "Make-up Grade 
for Incomplete" form and file it with the Records Office. If 
the student does not complete the necessary work by the 
agreed upon and stated deadline, the faculty member can 
submit a permanent grade change at that time. Automati- 
cally at the one year limit, the "I" will convert to an "F" or 
to a back-up grade if so designated by the instaictor. The 
changing of an "I" to a letter grade requires notification 
and processing at various administrative levels. It may take 
several weeks before the letter grade and credits earned 
appear on the students 's transcript, and in some cases, may 
delay approval for graduation. The grade of "I" does not 
affect the computation of GPA until a pennanent grade is 
assigned. Students who receive an "I" must not register 
for the same course nor can they later withdraw from the 
course. 

AUD indicates the student was enrolled in a course 
on an audit basis. 

NR, no record, is assigned by an instructor to indicate 
a registration or attendance problem. It is a temporary 
mark on the transcript and must be replaced by a grade. 
An NR is changed to a grade of F after one semester if 
no other grade can be obtained from the instructor by the 
appropriate dean. 

Grade Point Average 

The grade point average is computed on the basis of 
all semester hours attempted for credit within the Uni- 
versity of South Carolina, except for hours carried on a 
pass-fail basis. The GPA is not affected by courses taken 
on a non-credit or audit basis. 

The grade points earned in courses carried with a 
passing grade are computed by multiplying the number 
of semester hour credits assigned to the course by a fac- 
tor determined by the grade. For courses in which the 
uradc of A is earned, the factor is 4; for B^ , .^.5; for B, 3; 



56 



Academic Regulations 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



for C+, 2.5; for C, 2; for D+, 1 .5 and for D, 1. The grade 
point average is detennined by dividing the sum total of 
all grade points by the total number of hours attempted 
for credit (excepting hours carried on a pass-fail basis). 
No grade points are assigned to the symbols F, S, U, WF, 
W, I, AUD or NR. 

Grade Reports 

At the end of each semester, students may access 
final grades through the USC Upstate Web page. 

Course Grade Forgiveness 

It is the policy of the University of South Carolina that 
every currently enrolled, fully-admitted, degree-seeking 
undergraduate earning a "D+", "D", "F" or "WF" in a 
USC course may take up to two (2) undergraduate courses 
for a second time for the purpose of grade forgiveness. 
Both the first and second grades shall appear on the USC 
permanent record, but only the second grade will be used 
in computing the University of South Carolina cumulative 
grade point average. An explanatory notice will appear on 
the record. Once grade forgiveness is applied to a repeated 
course, the action may not be revoked. 

Eligible students wishing to apply the course grade 
forgiveness policy to a course enrollment may do so at 
any time during their undergraduate enrollment, but no 
applications will be honored after the degree is awarded. 
Grade forgiveness can only be applied once per course for 
a maximum of two courses (not to exceed 8 credits) on a 
student's undergraduate academic record, without regard 
to the number of degrees sought. Under the grade forgive- 
ness policy, the forgiven and repeated class must both be 
taken at the same USC campus. Courses transferred from 
other institutions are excluded from this policy. 

This policy does not preclude students from repeat- 
ing classes multiple times, in accordance with program 
requirements, but only the second attempt at the class may 
forgive the original grade of D+. D. F, or WF. 

Only a regular letter grade can replace a forgiven 
grade. Grades of "W", "I", "S". "U", or "AUDIT" may 
not replace previous grades. Grades carrying an honor 
code violation sanction of "X" are not eligible for grade 
forgiveness. 

Established requirements for repeating classes, admis- 
sion to, or progression in, specific academic programs of 
the University take precedence over the grade forgiveness 
policy. Program or progression grade point averages are 
not affected by this policy. Refer to the guidelines for 
each program for specific requirements. 

Courses intended to be repeated for additional credit, 
such as research orapplied music, are not eligible for grade 
forgiveness. Semester honors (dean's or president's honor 
list), academic standing (scholastic deficiency, probation, 
suspension), or previous grade point totals will not change 
retroactively as a result of applying this policy. 

Students who have been granted Academic Forgive- 
ness to reset the grade point average after readmission are 
not eligible for course grade forgiveness. Please refer the 
bulletin entry for Academic Forgiveness for Former USC 
Students with Less Than a 2.00 Cumulative GPA. 

Transcripts 



A transcript of students' records carries the following 
infomiation: current status, a detailed statement of the 
scholastic record showing courses pursued with semester 
hours carried, semester hours earned, grades, grade points, 
and system of grading. A permanent record of all failures, 
incomplete grades and penalties such as probation, suspen- 
sion or other restrictions are also indicated. The transcript 
also contains references to other colleges or universities 
attended and the total credits accepted by USC Upstate. 
No partial record is issued. 

All requests for transcripts must be written. Students 
needing a copy of their transcript or a certified copy of the 
end-of-semester grade report must complete a transcript 
request form at the Records Office. All official transcripts 
are processed through USC Columbia. Transcript costs 
are $8.00 for each copy. No transcript is issued to students 
who are indebted to the University. 

With the exception of copies made for internal uni- 
versity use, no copy of a student's records is released 
anywhere (including the state department of education) 
without the student's written consent, unless required by 
law or court order. 

Academic Forgiveness 

A former University of South Carolina undergraduate 
student who meets all of the following conditions may 
apply for academic forgiveness: 

1 . The student must have a cumulative GPA of 
less than 2.0 on all University of South 
Carolina course work. 

2. The student was not enrolled at any 
University of South Carolina campus for 
at least 48 months. 

3. The student must be readmitted to a degree 
program at the University of South Carolina 
and must complete at least 24 hours of 
approved graded course work prior to 
applying for academic forgiveness. 

4. After readmission to the University, the 
student must earn a cumulative GPA of 
at least 2.0 and meet the progression 
requirements of his or her degree program. 

5. The student has not previously been granted 
academic forgiveness. 

A student who has met these conditions and desires 
academic forgiveness must submit a written request for 
academic forgiveness to the dean of the school in which 
the student is enrolled. After verification of the student's 
eligibility, the dean shall inform the registrar that academic 
forgiveness has been granted to the student. 

Once academic forgiveness has been granted, the 
following apply to the student's academic record: 

1. All curriculum requirements will be in 
accordance with those in force at the time of 
or subsequent to the student's readmission. 

2. The student may not receive academic 
honors upon graduation. 

3. The student's grade point average is 
recalculated beginning with the semester in 
which the student was readmitted to the 
University. 

4. Courses in which the student received a 



Academic Regulations 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



57 



passing grade prior to readmission and the 
granting of academic forgiveness may, at 
the discretion of the student's school, be 
used for academic credit, but are not used in 
the calculation of the grade point average. 

5. The following statement shall appear on the 
academic record of any student granted 
academic forgiveness: "This student was grant- 
ed academic forgiveness under the University 
of South Carolina Academic Forgiveness Pro- 
gram. No courses taken prior to ( date of re- 
admission ) are used in the calculation of the 
GPA, but those in which the student received 

a passing grade may be used to meet degree 
requirements." 

6. The permanent academic record will remain an 
unmodified record of all work attempted at the 
University of South Carolina. 

7. A cumulative GPA of 2.0 is required on all 
work following academic forgiveness for pur- 
poses of graduation. 

Classification of Students 

Classification of students is based on the total number 
of semester hours earned. A student must have earned 30 
semester hours to be classified as a sophomore, 60 for 
classification as a junior, and 90 for classification as a 
senior. Students are classified at the beginning of each 
semester. 

Academic Honors 

Honor Lists 

Each semester, academic achievement is recognized by 
entering students' names on the chancellor's honor list and 
the dean's honor list. The chancellor's honor list requires a 
GPA of 4.0 earned on a minimum of 1 2 credited semester 
hours. The dean's honor list requires a grade point average 
of 3.5 or higher (3.25 or higher for freshmen) earned on 
a minimum of 12 credited semester hours. 

No course carried on a pass-fail basis is counted 
toward the 12 hours required for either the chancellor's 
or dean's honor lists. 

Graduation with Honors 

Graduation with honors is based on a cumulative 
GPA calculated on all work in the student's college ca- 
reer, including any attempted at other institutions. This 
calculation includes all courses attempted, not just those 
submitted in fulfillment of graduation requirements. 

Transfer students who apply to graduate with honors, 
in addition to their overall record, must show a GPA within 
the University of South Carolina which meets the level 
specified for the honors being sought. 

The following designations indicate a consistently high 
level of academic achievement through the student's entire 
academic career. To graduate with such honors, a student 
must have earned at least 60 credit hours applicable to the 
degree in residence at the University. Courses taken by a 
transient student at other institutions, by correspondence, 
by examination, or by exemption are not considered "in 
residence." 



Summa cum Laude: A cumulative GPA of 3.95-4.00 
Magna cum Laude: A cumulative GPA of 3.75-3.94 
Cum Laude: A cumulative GPA of 3.50-3.74 

For purposes of the graduation ceremony and program, 
academic honors are calculated on the student's previous 
semester. 

Honorary Societies 

Students whose records demonstrate superior aca- 
demic achievement may be invited to join several honor 
societies chartered on the USC Upstate campus. These 
organizations exist not only to recognize outstanding 
students but also to promote academic achievement in all 
areas of the University. 

In 2005, the University of South Carolina Upstate 
was granted a chapter of Alpha Sigma Lambda National 
Honor Society, the oldest and largest honor society devoted 
to the recognition of non-traditional students pursuing 
higher education. Alpha Sigma Lambda National Honor 
Society was established in 1 945 to honor superior scholar- 
ship of nontraditional students. 

Alpha Mu Gamma, the national collegiate foreign 
language honor society, was founded in 1931 with the 
primary purpose of honoring students for outstanding 
achievement in foreign language study during college. 
Activities of the society are: biennial national conventions, 
regional conferences, chapter meetings and special chapter 
activities like sponsorship of National Foreign Language 
Week. 

A chapter of Gamma Beta Phi national honor society 
was chartered at USC Upstate in 1978. Membership is 
open to students who rank in the top 15 percent of their 
class and who have completed 1 5 or more semester hours 
in residence at USC Upstate. 

A chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, a national education 
honorary fraternity, was established at USC Upstate in the 
spring of 1 978. It is open to juniors and seniors who have 
outstanding academic records and a strong commitment 
to the profession of education. 

The Mu Rho Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, the In- 
ternational Honor Society for Nursing, was chartered in 
March 1992. Membership is open to BSN students in the 
top 35 percent of the senior class with a minimum GPA of 
3.0. This academic society strives to promote excellence 
and the advancement of nursing knowledge, research and 
leadership. 

Omicron Delta Kappa is a leadership and scholar- 
ship honor society affiliated with Omicron Delta Kappa 
national fraternity. Membership is open to juniors and 
seniors who rank in the upper 20 percent of their class 
and who meet chapter criteria for leadership and service 
to the campus. 

Phi Kappa Phi, dedicated to the recognition and 
promotion of academic excellence in all fields of higher 
education, is the nation's oldest and largest all-discipline 
honor society. Membership by in Phi Kappa Phi is by invi- 
tation only. Those invited to membership include the top 
7.5 percent of last-term juniors and the top 10 percent of 
seniors, along with outstanding graduate students, faculty, 
professional staff, and alumni. 



58 



Academic Regulations 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Pi Sigma Alpha is the national political science honor 
society. The Nu Kappa chapter was chartered at USC Up- 
state in 1982. Membership is open to students who attain 
a B average, both overall and in political science courses. 
Applicants must have completed 10 semester hours in 
political science and be ranked in the upper third of their 
college class. 

Psi Chi, the National Honor Society in Psychology, 
was founded in 1929 for the purposes of encouraging, 
stimulating, and maintaining excellence in scholarship 
and advancing the science of psychology. The chapter at 
USC Upstate was chartered in 1993. To be eligible for 
membership, students must be psychology majors (or IDS 
bi-disciplinary psychology majors) who have completed 
at least three semesters of college work including nine 
hours of psychology. Eligible students must rank in the 
top 35 percent of their class and have a minimum GPA of 
3.0 in psychology courses. 

Graduation 

Requirements and Procedures 

Applicants for graduation are urged to confer with 
the appropriate chair or dean about their major program 
and degree requirements before the beginning of their last 
semester of residence at USC Upstate. 

Academic Residency Requirements. The last 
twenty-five per cent of the semester hours of the degree 
program must be completed in residence at the University. 
In residence means that students are regularly enrolled in 
the University, are members of a class which is supervised 
by a faculty member of USC Upstate, and in other ways 
conform to the requirements that are normally connoted by 
the term in residence. In residence requirements may not 
be met by courses for which credit is earned by exemption 
or examination, or courses for which transfer credit was 
awarded. Students who have not established credit for the 
prescribed number of hours in residency are not eligible 
for graduation. 

Residency Requirements in the Major. To receive 
a degree, students must complete at least 12 semester 
hours of major course credit at USC Upstate or at other 
campuses in the USC system. 

Degree Applications. Candidates for degrees must 
file formal applications prior to the last academic term 
before graduation with the Records Office on forms ob- 
tained at that office. Applications must be filed according 
to the deadlines published in the course schedule. In order 
to graduate for the term applied for, all academic work, 
including transfer credit, exemption exams and make up 
of incompletes, must be received in the Records Office 
prior to the end of the semester. Students who have ap- 
plied for graduation but did not meet degree requirements 
must re-apply for the appropriate term. 

Semester A pplications due in A pplications due Ceremony 
Graduating Deans/Division Offices in Records Office 
May December 1 January' 20 May 

(walk in May) 



All course work completed by the end of the spring semester. 
August February 15 March 1 May 

(walk in May) 
All course work completed by the end of summer II semester. 

December April 15 May 1 December 

(walk in December) 

All course work completed by the end of fall semester. 

Graduation Requirements. Students submit to their dean 
a list of courses meeting all regulations and requirements 
of their school and major department which they claim 
for graduation and for which their overall GPA and their 
GPA on USC system course work is at least 2.0. This list, 
after verification, forms the basis for the dean's approval 
or rejection ofstudents" applications for graduation. (This 
list contains only the courses in which students have per- 
formed at or above the required level. The list need not 
contain all courses attempted or passed, but only those 
which students wish to submit in ftilfillment of graduation 
requirements. ) Students who have been granted academic 
forgiveness must have an overall GPA of at least 2.0 since 
returning to USC Upstate. A minimum grade of C is re- 
quired for any course submitted for fulfillment of general 
or intensive major requirements in most degree programs. 
Exceptions to this requirement are noted in the description 
of each academic program. 

Second Undergraduate Degree 

At times the University confers a second undergraduate 
degree upon candidates who have completed all require- 
ments for the desired degree. A second degree is awarded 
provided that the additional requirements for the second 
degree include a minimum of 1 8 semester hours beyond 
those required for the first degree. Students may pursue 
both degrees simultaneously. A separate application is 
required for each USC Upstate degree. 

Student Responsibility 

The USC Upstate Student Handbook contains ad- 
ditional rules and regulations as well as the Code of 
Academic Responsibility. Students are responsible for 
obtaining a copy of the handbook from the Student Affairs 
Office upon registration. 

Notification of Student Rights 
Under FERPA 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
(FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to 
their education records. They are: 

(1) The right to inspect and review the student 's edu- 
cation records within 45 days of the day the University 
receives a request for access. 

Students should submit to the registrar, dean, head of 
the academic division, or other appropriate official, written 
requests that identify the record( s ) they wish to inspect. The 
university official will make arrangements for access and 
notify the student of the time and place where the records 
may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the 
university official to whom the request was submitted, that 
official shall advise the student of the correct official to 



Academic Regulations 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



59 



whom the request should be addressed. 

(2) The right to request the uiiiendmenl of the student s 
eduecitiou reeords that the student believes are inaccurate 
or tnisleading. 

Students may ask the University to amend a record that 
they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write 
the University official responsible for the record, clearly 
identifying the part of the record they want changed, and 
specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. 

If the University decides not to amend the record as 
requested by the student, the University will notify the 
student of the decision and advise the student of his or her 
right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. 
Additional information regarding the hearing procedures 
will be provided to the student when notified of the right 
to a hearing. 

(ij The right to consent to disclosures of personally 
identifiable information contained in the student's educa- 
tion records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes 
disclosure without consent. 

The University of South Carolina will disclose in- 
formation from a student's education records only with 
the written consent of the student, except: 

(a) To school officials with legitimate educational 
interests; 

•A school official is a person employed by 
the University in an administrative, 
supervisory, academic or research, or 
support staff position; a person or 
company with whom the University 
has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, 
or collection agent); a person serving on the 
Board of Trustees; or a student serving on 
an official committee, such as a disciplinary 
or grievance committee, or assisting another 
school official in performing his or 
her tasks. 

•A school official has a legitimate 
educational interest if the official needs to 
review an education record in order to ful 
fill his or her professional responsibility. 

(b) To officials of other institutions in which the 
student seeks or intends to enroll provided that 
the student has previously requested a release 
of his/her record; 

(c) To authorized representatives of the U.S. 
Department of Education, the Comptroller 
General of the United States, state educational 
authorities, organizations conducting studies 
for or on behalf of the University, and accredit- 
ing organizations; 

(d) In connection with a student's application 
for, and receipt of, financial aid; 

(e) To comply with a judicial order or lawfully 
issued subpoena; 

(0 To parents of dependent students as defined by 

the Internal Revenue Code, Section 152; 
(g) To appropriate parties in a health or safety 

emergency; or 
(h) To the alleged victim of any crime or violence 

of the results of any disciplinary proceedings 

conducted by the University. 



( i ) The University may disclose the result of a 
disciplinaty proceeding to a parent or guardian 

so long as the student is under the age of 21 at 
the time of the incident and the proceeding 
has resulted in a violation of University drug or 
alcohol policies, or any federal, state, or local 
law. 
(j) To students currently registered in a particular 

class, the names and email addresses of others 

on the roster may be disclosed in order to 

participate in class discussion. 

The University of South Carolina has designated the 
following items as directory information: a student's 
name, electronic mail address, local and permanent 
mailing addresses and telephone numbers, semesters of 
attendance, enrollment status (full- or part-time), date of 
admission, date of graduation, school, majors and areas 
of concentration, whether or not currently enrolled, clas- 
sification (freshman, etc.), type of degree being pursued, 
degrees, honors, and awards received (including scholar- 
ships and fellowships), weight and height of members of 
athletic teams, and whether the student has participated 
in officially recognized activities and sports sponsored 
by the University. 

The University may disclose any of these items without 
prior written consent, unless the student has submitted a 
written request to the Office of the Registrar not to release 
directory information pertaining to them. Requests will 
be processed within 24 hours after receipt. Directory in- 
fomiation will be withheld from student directories and 
telephone books only if notification is received priorto the 
publication of these documents. The electronic directory is 
updated each weekend; requests for non-disclosure will be 
honored with the next update after the request is processed 
by the staff of the Office of the Registrar. 

(4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. De- 
parttnent of Education concerning alleged failures by the 
University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. 

The name and address of the office that administers 
FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. De- 
partment of Education, 600 Independence Avenue, SW, 
Washington DC 20202-4605. 

Questions concerning this law and the University's 
procedures concerning release of academic infonnation 
may be directed to the Office of the Registrar at 864- 
503-5220. 



60 



/Academic Regulations 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 




Academic Programs 



Curricula 

The curricula established for all bachelor's degrees 
include, generally, a set of courses that fulfill the general 
education requirements, a set of courses that comprise 
a departmental major, a set of courses that comprise a 
cognate or minor, and several elective courses. 

General Education Requirements. AGeneral Education 

Program by definition otTers students a common academic 
experience and stimulates an appetite for life-long educa- 
tion. Mandatory ingredients of this program include the 
acquisition of college-level skills in communication and 
reasoning and exposure to the basic areas of knowledge 
that characterize an educated person. An effective general 
education program should cultivate an appreciation of 
cultural as well as intellectual diversity, and the ongoing 
cultivation of personal integrity and social responsibil- 
ity. The conditions necessary for such desired character 
development are therefore embedded in the USC Upstate 
General Education program: building skill and knowledge- 
based foundations for living in a complex global society 
and for continued learning, expanding the breadth of 
students' scholarly horizons, and integrating information 
from across disparate disciplines. 

A set of general education requirements is included 
in each baccalaureate program. The purpose of such 
requirements is to provide a broadly based educational 
foundation upon which an area of specialization may be 
developed. For this reason, students are encouraged to 
select various courses outside their major area of study. 

To help ensure common educational competencies 
and skills in all students, the faculty has adopted a set of 
general education requirements that apply across all cur- 
ricula of the University. However, the options provided 
in the general education requirements have been limited 
and structured to meet the needs of each major. Students 
are, therefore, advised to follow the specific requirements 
listed in the catalog under the individual majors. 

General Education Requirements 

The general education requirements listed below are 
incorporated into al 1 maj ors at U SC Upstate. They represent 
a minimum level of introduction to various subdivisions in 
the 1 iberal arts, providing a common educational experience 
for all USC Upstate graduates. A course may be used to 
satisfy only one general education requirement. 

I. Communication 

Goal: The USC Upstate graduate should be able 
to communicate effectively in English, both orally and 
in writing. 

English 101 and 102 6 

Speech 201 3 

Objective: Specifically, the graduate should 
speak and write in a coherent, insightful and 
well-organized manner, using the conventions 
of Standard English. 

Student Learning Outcomes; The student will 
be able to: 

1 . Develop, illustrate, and support clear and pre- 
cise ideas in essays, papers, or speeches. 



2. Synthesize, integrate and cite appropriate 
material in essays, papers or speeches. 

3. Write or deliver grammatically correct es- 
says, papers, or speeches for a variety of 
audiences. 

II. Mathematics & Logic 

Goal: The USC Upstate graduate should be able 
to reason effectively, understand and solve problems, 
and communicate quantitatively. 

One mathematics course, and 3 

One course from math, logic or statistics 3 

Objective: Specifically, the graduate should demon- 
strate the ability to analyze and synthesize logically and 
support quantitative conclusions with appropriate rationale 
or calculations. 
Student Learning Outcomes: The student will be able to: 

1. Analyze a problem and fonnulate a quantitative/ 
logical description using correct terminology and 
symbolism. 

2. Use the description to achieve a resolution using 
correct logical or quantitative reasoning. 

3. Communicate the conclusions or solutions 
orally or in writing, supported by reasoning or 
calculations as appropriate. 

III. Information Technology 

Goal: The USC Upstate graduate should have an 
awareness of information technologies and the ability 
to gather and process information as well as to com- 
municate it to others effectively. 

One information technology course 3 

Objective: Specifically, the graduate should dem- 
onstrate an ability to apply information technologies. 
Student Learning Outcomes: The student will be able to: 

1. Use basic knowledge of computers and 
information technology to collect and analyze 
data, interpret results, and communicate findings. 

2. Identify and use information technology 
resources and evaluate them for accuracy, 
suitability, and security. 

3. Examine the social and ethical issues related to 
the use of information technology. 

IV. Natural Sciences 

Goal: The USC Upstate graduate should under- 
stand scientific methods, principles and processes as 
well as their implications for society. 

Two courses including one laboratory course 

Selected from the following: astronomy, biology, 
chemistry, geography 201, geology, physics 7-8 

Objective: Specifically, the graduate should demon- 
strate knowledge of important scientific models that form 
a basis for understanding the modem world and an ability 
to participate in scientific investigations. 

General Education courses in the natural sciences 
that contain a mandatory laboratory component must meet 
all of the following student learning outcomes. Courses 
without a mandatory laboratory requirement must meet 
the first two student learning outcomes, while optional 
laboratory courses must meet the third student learning 
outcome. 



62 



/Academic Programs 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Student Learning Outcomes: The student will be able to: 

1. Demonstrate iaiowledge of fundamental 
concepts from either the life sciences or physical 
sciences. 

2. Demonstrate knowledge of scientific 
methodology. 

3. Conduct experiments in a laboratory setting and 
support conclusions based on his or her own 
experimentation. 

V. Arts & Humanities 

Goal: The USC Upstate graduate should develop 
an awareness of the arts and humanities. 

Objective: Specifically, the graduate should demon- 
strate knowledge of various modes of human thought and 
artistic expression. 

One fine arts course: art, music, theatre or 

Afi-ican American studies 3 

One course from the following:** 3 

Literature, African American studies, American studies, 
art, linguistics, film or writing, history, music, philosophy, 
religion, speech, theatre. 

* *No more than ihree credit hours from a specific discipline 
will be accepted for the general education requirement under 
the Arts and Humanities distribution. 

Student Leaming Outcomes: General education courses 
in the Arts and Humanities must meet one or more of the 
following competencies. The student will be able to: 

1 . Analyze and evaluate creative works and/or 
demonstrate an ability to perform works of art. 

2. Discuss ways in which the arts and humanities 
shape and are shaped by culture. 

VI. Foreign Language/Culture 

Goal: The USC Upstate graduate should have an 
understanding of other cultures, including basic com- 
munication skills in at least one foreign language. 

The minimum acceptable level of competency is comple- 
tion of the 102 level of a language. Student who place into 
the 201 or higher level of a language satisfy the language 
requirement but will have additional hours in electives, if 

hours are required by their degree program 3 

Objective: Specifically, the graduate should demonstrate 
an understanding of foreign culture or cultures combined 
with basic reading, writing, speaking and listening skills 
in at least one foreign language. 
Student Leaming Outcomes: The student will be able to: 

1 . Engage in simple conversations in a language 
other than English. 

2. Demonstrate basic reading and writing skills in 
a language other than English. 

3. Demonstrate knowledge of the distinctive 
features of the culture(s) associated with the 
language he or she is studying. 

VII. History 

Goal: The USC Upstate graduate should under- 
stand the development and significance of historical 
events. 

History 111 or History 112 3 

Objective: Specifically, the graduate should demonstrate 
knowledge of the history of at least one culture/society. 



Student Leaming Outcomes: The student will be able to: 

1 . Demonstrate knowledge of at least two of the 
following historical dimensions: political, cultural, 
intellectual, economic, and social. 

2. Demonstrate an understanding of causal 
relationships between historical events. 

VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Goal: The USC Upstate graduate should possess 
a scientific understanding of the complex determinates 
of human interaction. 

Courses from two of the following, with two 

disciplines represented: 6 

African American studies. Economics 221, 222; 
Govemment & International studies; Geography (except 
201 &202); Psychology (except 225); Sociology (except 
201); Women's studies 

Objective: Specifically, the graduate should demon- 
strate knowledge of internal and extemal influences that 
affect human behavior. 
Student Leaming Outcomes: The student will be able to: 

1 . Identify and define discipline-specific terms, 
facts, concepts, and major principles of the social 
sciences. 

2. Identify the advantages and limitations of basic 
research techniques used in the social sciences. 

3. Apply selected concepts of the social sciences 
to real social situations. 



Total General Education Requirements 

43-46 Credit Hours 

must have a "C" or above in the course 

One course from the following 3 



Total general education requirements 47-60 



Foreign Language Placement Policy 

I. Placement into the following courses based on scores on 
the Foreign Language Placement Exam administered 
at USC Upstate on orientation dates: 

French German Spanish 



101 


101 


101 


102 


102 


102 


201 


201 


201 


202 


202 


202 



Placement into 201 level course with the appropriate 
score on the College Board SAT II Subject Test in 
French, German or Spanish. The following tables 
summarizes placement: 



French 


German 


Spanish 


Placement 


480 or below 


450 or below 


450 or below 


101 


490-530 


460-500 


460-510 


102 


540-580 


510-560 


520-560 


201 


590-630 


570-620 


570-620 


202 


640 or above 


630 or above 


630 or above 


300-level 
course or 
above 



IKcademic Programs 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



63 



Language 


Score 


Credit Awarded for 
use Upstate Course(s) 


French Lang 


3,4 


FR 101. 102 


French Lang 


5 


FR 101. 102,201 


French Lit 


3 


FRIOI. 102 


French Lit 


4 


FR 101. 102.201 


French Lit 


5 


FR 101. 102.201,202 


German Lang 


3,4 


GER 101, 102 


German Lang 


5 


GERlOl, 102,201 


Spanish Lang 


3,4 


SPAN 101, 102 


Spanish Lang 


5 


SPAN 101,102,201 


Spanish Lit 


3,4,5 


SPAN 202 



III. The following table summarizes credit awarded under 
the Advanced Placement (AP) Program. If a student 
has taken AP exams but has not yet received his/her 
results, he/she should register for courses based on 
assuming AP credit. 

Credit 

Hours 

6 

9 

6 

9 

12 

6 

9 

6 

9 

3 

IV. Students who are multilingual, who have learned 
English as a foreign language, or who through fam- 
ily and/or cultural background have strong skills in a 
foreign language should see the chair of Languages, 
Literature, and Composition or the coordinator of 
foreign languages to determine if they will be exempt 
without credit from the foreign language requirement of 
their majors. An exemption form will be placed in each 
student's file and copy sent to records. Such students 
will, at the discretion of the chair or coordinator of 
foreign languages, be allowed to take upper division 
courses in their native language and receive credit. 

V. While colleges and universities are not obligated to 
waive foreign language requirements for students with 
learning disabilities (according to Section 504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1 973 ), USC Upstate has made the 
following provision: students who are certified by the 
USC Upstate Office of Disability Services has having 
learning disabilities that may interfere with learning a 
foreign language, may fulfill their general education 
requirement in foreign languages by taking a course in 
English on the history, culture, civilization or literature 
of a non-English speaking country or countries. 

Major Requirements 

Each baccalaureate program includes courses to en- 
able students to specialize in a particular area of interest. A 
minimum grade of C is required for any course submitted 
for fulfillment of a major requirement. Exceptions to this 
requirement are noted in the description of each academic 
program. 

Senior Seminar 

All baccalaureate programs will include a senior 
seminar course that will serve as a capstone experience 
for the program. This experience will allow students to 
integrate knowledge from their discipline and theirGeneral 
Education Program. Senior seminars must also critically 
evaluate related ethical issues and have students articulate 
relevant topics in written and oral presentations. Senior 
seminars must provide an opportunity for the assessment 
of program and general education goals. These courses 
are the culminating experience of students in a particular 



program and may follow a variety of formats such as 
student teaching or specific courses. 

Cognates and Minors 

Students seeking degrees in the College of Arts and 
Sciences are required to complete either a cognate or 
a minor. Neither a cognate nor a minor is required for 
professional degrees, (i.e., nursing, education, and busi- 
ness). Both cognates and minors are concentrated study 
in an area that complements work in the major. Courses 
may not be counted toward both a cognate and a minor; 
however, students may apply up to 6 hours of minor credit 
toward general education requirements. See each degree 
program for cognate or minor regulations specific to a 
degree program. 

Cognate 

Cognate course requirements are selected by a student and 
the major academic advisor to meet the unique needs and 
interests of the individual student. The cognate consists 
of 1 2 semester hours of a coherent selection of courses, 
300-level or higher, approved in advance by the student's 
major advisor and supporting the course work in the major. 
A cognate may include one or more disciplines outside 
the major field. 

Minor 

Minor course requirements are predetermined by academic 
disciplines or by multidisciplinary committees. The minor 
should develop a coherent basic preparation in a second 
field of study or introduce students to the interdisciplin- 
ary examination of an important area of learning. It is a 
minimum of 1 8 semester hours of prescribed courses with 
at least 12 semester hours at the 300 level or higher. No 
more than six semester hours may be earned in general 
education courses. A grade of C or better must be earned in 
each course used to satisfy the requirements of a minor. 
While many degree programs include the option of a 
minor as part of the degree program, not all degree pro- 
grams include the option of a minor. Even in these latter 
programs, however, any student pursuing a Bachelor of 
Arts or Bachelor of Science degree may also pursue a 
university-approved minor. Note that particular degree 
programs may have restrictions on choice of minors. 
Completing the degree with a minor may require more 
than the minimum 120 credit hours to graduate. 
USC Upstate offers the following minors: 

African-American Studies 

American Studies 

Art History 

Biology 

Business 

Chemistry 

Communication 

Computer Science 

Conflict Resolution 

Criminal Justice 

Economics 

English 

Film Studies 

French 

Geography 



6^ 



Academic Programs 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



German Studies 

History 

International Studies 

Jazz Studies 

Mathematics 

Nonprofit Administration 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Spanish Translation/Interpretation 

Speech Communication 

Theatre 

Women's Studies 

Electives 

Most degree programs allow students the opportunity 
to take a limited number of courses that do not fijlfill any 
specific academic requirements. Normally, any course can 
be counted as an elective, but some restrictions may be 
imposed by particular degree programs. Elective credits 
for participation in group performance music activity 
courses (SMUS 126, 127, 128, 129, 131, and 327) may 
be counted up to a maximum of eight credits. Elective 
credits for special university courses (SUNV) may be 
counted up to a maximum of six credits. 

Special Programs 

Three-Year Degree Program 

use Upstate offers students the opportunity to 
complete programs of study to earn a bachelor's degree in 
just three years. This accelerated program is available in 
early childhood education, elementary education, criminal 
justice, psychology and sociology. 

Participants in the Three- Year Degree program are 
expected to indicate their interest at the time they apply 
as freshmen. Students may graduate in three years by 
meeting all academic requirements and by following the 
suggested course sequence requiring students to earn 1 6 to 
18 hours per semester and 9 to 12 hours each summer. 

See the section on the School of Education for further 
information on early childhood education and elementary 
education. More information on majors in criminal justice, 
psychology and sociology are available under the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

It may be possible to complete other majors in three 
years. Contact the appropriate college or school. 
Pre-engineering 

The use Upstate pre-engineering program is designed 
to meet the entrance requirements forthe USC Columbia and 
Clemson University schools of engineering. The pre-engi- 
neering program is a two-year course of study that includes 
basic engineering courses, science and mathematics courses, 
and humanities and social science courses. After comple- 
tion of the two-year pre-engineering curriculum, students 
must transfer to another institution to complete the last two 
years of the baccalaureate. Entry to these degree-completion 
programs is on a competitive basis. For more information 
on the pre-engineering program, contact the chair of the 
Division of Natural Sciences and Engineering. 



Health-related Fields 

In addition to nursing, USC Upstate offers other 
opportunities to students interested in health-related 
careers. Different advisement tracks are available forpre- 
chiropractic, pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-veterinary and 
pre-optometry students. Typically, a student completes a 
four-year baccalaureate in the sciences at USC Upstate 
before entering a postgraduate professional program. A 
student must seek admission to a school that offers the 
desired professional degree. Entry into these professional 
programs is on a competitive basis. 

USC Upstate also offers advisement programs to 
students interested in allied health professions (e.g., pre- 
physical therapy, pre-occupational therapy, pre-speech 
pathology). After completion of two or more years of 
course work at USC Upstate, students must apply for 
admission to a school that offers the specific professional 
baccalaureate completion program. The number of credit 
hours to be earned at USC Upstate is dependent upon the 
specific pre-professional program. The Medical University 
of South Carolina ( MUSC) offers the greatest diversity of 
allied health baccalaureate and graduate programs in the 
state. Entry into MUSC programs or other professional 
degree completion programs is on a competitive basis. More 
information on health-related programs may be obtained 
from the Division of Natural Sciences and Engineering. 

Pre-law' 

USC Upstate provides advisement and information 
about various law school programs through the chair 
of History, Political Science, Philosophy and American 
Studies. Because most law schools do not prescribe a 
specific curriculum, USC Upstate does not offer a pre- 
law major. While students interested in law often major 
in political science, a variety of other disciplines such as 
history, English, economics, business and math provide 
excellent backgrounds. Law schools want students who 
have mastered written and spoken English and who have 
the ability to analyze and think critically. They prefer a 
variety of learning experiences since the practice of law 
encompasses knowledge in many fields. In addition to 
certain requirements in the general education program, such 
as speech, math, computer science, lab science. American 
government, the following courses represent the broad 
base of knowledge preferred by most law schools: 

• Freshman and Sophomore Years 
Psychology 101 

Foreign language 
Sociology 101 
Economics 221 
History 112 
Accounting (SBAD 225) 

• Junior and Senior Years 

Logic 205 and 207 

International Law (SGIS 460) 

Literature Course 

Legal Environment of Business (SBAD 347) 

Judicial Process (SGIS 452) 

Constitutional Law (SGIS 450) 

Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (SGIS 451) 

'Students desiring a postgraduate professional degree should note 
requirements for the Three-Plus-One Program (Page 66j 



Academic Programs 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



65 



Students should understand that taking specific 
courses is not nearly as important in gaining entrance to 
law school as maintaining a solid grade point average 
(G PA) and attaining a respectable score on the Law School 
Aptitude Test (LSAT). Students in any major or program 
interested in attending law school should contact the chair 
of History. Political Science. Philosophy and American 
Studies for assignment of a pre-law advisor. 

Pre-pharmacy 

use Upstate provides ad\ isement services to pre- 
pharmacy students through faculty members in chemistry. 
Each fall, representatives of the South Carolina College 
of Phannacy are invited to campus to meet with inter- 
ested use Upstate pre-phamiacy students. USC Upstate 
provides the course work required for admission into the 
South Carolina College of Pharmacy but does not award 
a degree in phannacy. The South Carolina College of 
Pharmacy considers applications from students who com- 
plete a minimum of 67 semester hours of pre-pharmacy 
course work at USC Upstate. Pre-pharmacy students are 
encouraged to consider completion of a Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Chemistry or Biology to improve their chances 
of admission into a pharmacy school. The following 
recommended sequence of courses has been developed 
through consultation between the South Carolina College 
of Pharmacy and USC Upstate. 

Recommended Courses for the South Carolina College 
of Pharmacy 

• First Pre-pharmacy Year 
Biology 101: Biological Science I 
Biology 102: Biological Science II 
Chemistry 111: General Chemistry 
Chemistry 112: General Chemistry and 

Qualitative Analysis 
English 101, 102: Composition and Literature 
Mathematics 143: Calculus I 
Psychology 101: Introduction to Psychology 
Electives (6 semester hours) 

• Second Pre-pharmacy Year 
Biology 232: Human Anatomy 
Biology 242: Human Physiology 
Chemistry 331 : Organic Chemistry 
Chemistry 33 IL: Organic Chemistry Laboratory 
Chemistry 332: Organic Chemistry 
Chemistry 332L: Organic Chemistry Laboratory 
Mathematics 102: Elementary Statistics 
Physics 201 : General Physics 1 

Physics 202: General Physics II 

Economics 221: Principles of Macroeconomics 

or Economics 222: Principles of Microeconomics 

Speech 201 

Electives (3 semester hours) 

As soon as possible, students interested in pursu- 
ing a career in phannacy should contact the chair of 
the Division of Natural Sciences and Engineering for 
assignment to a pre-phannacy advisor. 

Three-Plus-One Program 

USC Upstate awards the Bachelor of Arts or the 
Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies to a stu- 



dent who has satisfactorily completed at least 90 semester 
hours of undergraduate work and one year (30 semester 
hours) of work in an approved accredited professional 
school, provided the applicant has: 

made application to the interdisciplinary studies 

program at USC Upstate; 

• satisfied all general education and B.A. or B.S. 
option requirements for the interdisciplinary 
studies degree, with all minimum grade require- 
ments met; 

completed a minimum ofl 5 semester hoursofju- 
nior- and senior-level courses at USC Upstate; 

• completed at least 30 semester hours of under- 
graduate work at USC Upstate; 

submitted a notice of intent, approved by the 
dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, prior 
to leaving USC Upstate to enterthe professional, 
postgraduate school; and 

• submitted official documents from the approved 
professional school demonstrating satisfactory 
completion of the first year of full-time study 
leading to a post-baccalaureate degree. 

A degree other than interdisciplinary studies may 
be awarded if the combination of course work taken at 
USC Upstate and the professional school is equivalent to 
the work required for another bachelor's degree program 
at USC Upstate. In such a case, the school in which the 
degree is offered may recommend awarding that bachelor 's 
degree. 



Army Reserve Officer Training Corps 
(ROTC) 

Participation in ROTC is voluntary. Semester hours 
earned with the department can be applied toward an 
academic degree program. Uniforms, textbooks and 
equipment required for the ROTC program are provided 
at no expense to the student. For ROTC scholarship 
students, the Army pays tuition and other expenses (see 
description under "Scholarships"). The ROTC program is 
nonnally four years of instruction; however, a two-year 
program is also offered. The four-year program of instruc- 
tion is divided into the Basic Program and the Advanced 
Course. 

The Basic Program. Acceptance may be considered 
when one of the following programs have been completed: 
six semester hours in the Basic Program, two years of 
active military duty with an honorable discharge, or 
three years of JROTC. Students must show leadership 
potential and meet the necessary physical and academic 
standards. Students participating in the Basic Program 
have no militaiy service obligation. 

The Advanced Program. Satisfactory completion 
of six semester hours in the Basic Program, substitute 
military experience (two years of active duty with an 
honorable discharge), or three years of JROTC qualifies 
students for entrance into the Advanced Program, if they 
have also shown leadership potential and have met the 
necessary physical and academic standards. The student 
must be an academic junior or senior w ith acceptance to 



66 



Academic Programs 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



graduate school to qualify for the advanced program. 

Normally taken during the student'sjunior and senior 
years, the Advanced Program offers a maximum of 12 
semester hours. It provides instruction in techniques of 
effective leadership, tactics, military law, logistics, ad- 
ministration, responsibility of the officer, and the exercise 
of command. It is designed to further the development 
of the student's leadership qualities. Advanced Program 
students receive a tax-free subsistence allowance of $150 
per month for 1 academic months per year, and are paid 
approximately $800 for the five-week Summer Camp they 
are required to attend after completion of their junior year. 
The total subsistence and pay amounts to more than $3,000 
while enrolled in the Advanced Program. Cadets graduat- 
ing from the ROTC program receive a second lieutenant's 
commission upon completing their undergraduate degree 
requirements. 

The Advanced Program cadet may elect to enter 
active duty for three years or participate in the Reserve 
Force Duty Program (R.F.D.) as means for fulfilling the 
incurred obligation for military service. Under the R.F.D. 
program, students are commissioned in either the National 
Guard or the U.S. Army Reserves for a total of eight years, 
during which time they attend monthly paid drill periods. 
This enables individuals to pursue civilian careers and 
serve their nation at the same time. The R.F.D. program 
can be guaranteed if the student desires. Moreover, stu- 
dents" preferences concerning the occupational specialty 
in which they wish to serve are taken into consideration 
prior to assignment. The options offered are numerous 
and attractive. 

ROTC Activities. In addition to normal classroom 
instruction, the Military Science Department sponsors 
numerous extracurricular activities. These activities are 
designed to complement and reinforce classroom skills 
and techniques. Participation is voluntary and no academic 
credit is awarded. The activities presently offered are the 
rifle team, and the Rangers. A chapter of the National 
Military Honor Society of Scabbard and Blade is avail- 
able for student participation. Adventure activities such as 
rappelling, orienteering, mountaineering and white water 
rafting are open for participation. 

Graduate Programs in Education 

use Upstate offers the Master of Education in Early 
Childhood Education, the Master of Education in Elemen- 
tary Education and the Master of Education in Special 
Education: Visual Impairment. Classes required forthese 
two programs of study are available in spring, summer 
and fall semesters. Individuals applying to these degree 
programs must submit: ( I ) a completed degree-enrollment 
application form, (2) a residency verification form, (3) a 
copy of a teaching certificate, (4) a $25 application fee, 

(5) a minimum Miller Analogy Test (MAT) score of 35 
or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score of 400 on 
the verbal section and 400 on the mathematics section, 

(6) official copies of the transcripts from all previous 
undergraduate and graduate studies, and (7) two letters 
of recommendation. Application materials are available 



from the USC Upstate Admissions Office or the USC 
Upstate Graduate Programs Office. Additional informa- 
tion about these programs is included in the back of the 
this catalog. 

USC Upstate also offers a variety of professional 
development graduate courses designed to help teach- 
ers update knowledge and skills essential for successful 
classrooms. These include for-pay summer institutes as 
well as grant-funded and contract courses. Information 
about professional development graduate courses can be 
obtained from the USC Upstate Graduate Programs Office. 
Six hours of approved professional development courses 
may be applied toward a graduate degree. 

The Extended Graduate Campus 

The Extended Graduate Campus encompasses Uni- 
versity of South Carolina Columbia graduate programming 
offered anywhere away from the Columbia campus, regard- 
less of delivery mechanism. New delivery mechanisms 
including two-way interactive, video and internet-based 
instruction are being phased into the programs to add 
depth to current offerings. The University offers degree 
programs at many locations around the state, including 
Spartanburg. 



Academic Programs 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



67 



Majors, Minors, and Programs 



Bachelor 's Degrees 

Art Studio (Graphic Design) 
Biology 

Business Administration and Economics 
(concentrations in accounting, economics/finance, busi- 
ness administration, management and marketing) 
Chemistry 

Communication (concentrations in electronic media, 
journalism, speech and theater) 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Science 
Criminal Justice 
Early Childhood Education 
Elementary Education 
Engineering Technology Management 
English 

Experimental Psychology 
History 

Information Management and Systems 
Interdisciplinary Studies 
Mathematics 
Middle Grades Education 
Nonprofit Administration 
Nursing 

Physical Education 
Political Science 

Secondary Education (concentrations in biology, chemistry, 
English, mathematics, social studies/history, and Spanish) 
Sociology 

Special Education: Learning Disabilities 
Spanish 



Minors 

African-American Studies 

American Studies 

Art History 

Biology 

Business 

Computer Science 

Conflict Resolution 

Chemistry 

Criminal Justice 

Geography 

Economics 

English 

German Studies 

History 

International Studies 

Jazz Studies 

Journalism 

French 

Mathematics 

Music Business 

Nonprofit Administration 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Spanish Interpreting 

Speech Communications 

Theatre 

Women's Studies 



Master 's Degrees 

Early Childhood Education 

Elementary Education 

Special Education: Visual Impairment 

Certification 

Early Childhood Education 
Elementary Education 
Middle Grades Education 
Physical Education 
Secondary Education 
Special Education: Learning Disabilities 
Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Teaching English to 
Speakers of Other Languages 



Pre-professional Programs 

Pre-Chiropractic 
Pre-Dental 
Pre-Engineering 
Pre- Law 
Pre-Medical 
Pre-Optometry 
Pre-Occupational Therapy 
Pre-Pharmacy 
Pre-Physical Therapy 
Pre-Physician Assisting 
Pre-Speech Pathology 
Pre- Veterinary Medicine 



6S 



Academic Programs 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 




Honors Program 



Vision 

The use Upstate Honors Program underscores the 
commitment of USC Upstate to academic excellence: 
excellent teaching, excellent learning, and excellent 
programming. The Honors Program cultivates academic 
excellence by oifering enhanced educational opportunities 
tailored to the special needs, aspirations, and motivations 
of students with outstanding intellectual and creative 
abilities. The Honors Program enriches the honors 
learning experience by playing an active role in raising the 
intellectual and cultural caliber of the entire campus. 

Mission Statement 

The Honors Program creates a community of scholars that 
achieves the highest standards of academic excellence. 
The goals are as follows: 

• to encourage an intellectual orientation by providing 
a challenging curriculum that emphasizes critical 
thinking, creative and active learning, integration of 
academic disciplines, in-depth exploration of new 
fields of study, and application of learning to other 
environments; 

• to develop the skills and qualities necessary for 
leadership both at USC Upstate and in the larger 
community through an emphasis on service 
orientation; and 

to provide a center of identity to meet the needs of 
outstanding students and to cultivate a self-image as 
honors students. 

Admission 

Admission to the Honors Program is selective and 
competitive. Great care is taken to admit the best-qualified 
applicants. 

Eligibility for Admission to the Honors Program 

First year students, sophomore-level and above 
students, and transfer students are eligible for admittance 
in the Honors Program upon review and approval by the 
Director of the Honors Program and the Honors Faculty 
Council. 

1. A first-year student is eligible to apply to the Honors 
Program if the student meets at least two of the 
following criteria: 

• a minimum SAT score of 1 1 00 or ACT of 24; 

• a ranking in the top ten percent of high school 
graduating class; 

• a cumulative high school grade point average 
of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale; 

• a Merit Award Program finalist; 

• a Chancellor or Valedictorian Scholar; 

• evidence of motivation and commitment to 
academic excellence. 

2. A current USC Upstate sophomore or junior is 

eligible to apply to the Honors Program if the 
student meets the following criteria: 

a cumulative GPA of 3.25 or higher on a 

minimum of 30 hours from USC Upstate; 

evidence of motivation and commitment to 

academic excellence. 



3. A transfer student is eligible to apply to the 

Honors Program if the student meets the following 
criteria: 

a cumulative GPA of 3.25 or higher from other 

academic institutions; 

evidence of motivation and commitment to 

academic excellence. 

Application Process 

Students apply for the Honors Program by submitting 
the following: 

• an application that includes student's academic 
record; significant extracurricular, community, 
and service activities (including employment); 
accomplishments, awards, and talents; and any 
involvement in academic research; 

• a 500-word essay discussing the goals and 
aspirations for an honors college experience; 
and 

• two letters of recommendation attesting to 
academic eligibility. 

• an interview with the Director of the Honors 
Program may be required. 

Exceptions to these requirements may be considered 
by the Director of the Honors Program. 

Students who have not been admitted to the Honors 
Program but have a cumulative GPA of 3.25 may 
participate in honors courses with the permission of the 
Director of the Honors Program in consultation with the 
faculty member teaching the honors course. 

Honors Credits from Other Institutions 

Up to 9 credit hours or three courses from other 
National Collegiate Honors Council institutions may be 
accepted for honors credit into the USC Upstate Honors 
Program. These courses must be compatible with the 
USC Upstate Honors Program. A syllabus or complete 
description of courses offered for acceptance into the 
program may be required for review by the Director of 
the Honors Program. All credits must be approved by the 
Director of the Honors Program. 

Completion Requirements 

To complete the Honors Program, honors students 
must earn a USC Upstate degree, satisfy all major and 
Honors Program requirements, and remain in good 
standing throughout their college careers. 

Honors students must 

• maintain a minimum GPA of 3.00 each 
semester and achieve a cumulative GPA of 
3.25 at the time of graduation; 

complete a minimum of two honors courses 
each year; and 

• demonstrate significant contributions to honors 
activities either by serving on the Honors 
Student Council or by participating in the 
programming of the Honors Program. 

Students who fall below the required minimum 
cumulative GPA of 3.0 in any semester are placed on 
honors probation. At the end of the probationary semester, 
students with a cumulative GPA of 3 .0 or higher are retumed 



70 



Hoi\ors Program 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



to regular honors status. Students with a cumulative GPA 
lower than 3.0 but with a semester cumulative GPA of 3.0 
or higher remain on honors probationary status. Students 
whose probationary semester cumulative GPA is lower 
than 3.0 are dismissed from the Honors Program. Students 
may apply for readmission to the Honors Program if their 
cumulative GPA is 3.0 or higher. 

Graduation Requirements 

To graduate from the Honors Program, honors 
students must: 

• complete the First Year Honors Experience in 
the case of first year honors students, or 
complete the Honors Colloquium in the case 
of other USC Upstate students and transfer 
students; 

• complete at least 18 hours of honors credit and 
3 hours of a senior thesis or project directed by 
an honors faculty member; the thesis or project 
must be presented to a public audience; 

• complete a minimum of 60 hours of service 
learning or community service at the time of 
graduation. Honors students complete service 
learning or community service hours either as 
a course requirement or by serving the 
university or community, independent of 
coursework. Service learning or community 
service is approved by the Director of the 
Honors Program; and 

• demonstrate significant contributions to honors 
activities either by serving on the Honors 
Student Council or by participating in the 
programming of the Honors Program. 



Curriculum 

To enroll in honors courses, students must be 
members of the Honors Program or granted approval by 
the Director of the Honors Program in consultation with 
the faculty teaching the course. 

To teach an honors course, faculty members must apply 
to the Honors Program and be approved by the Faculty 
Honors Council (see section. Faculty, below). The honors 
course must also be approved by the Honors Council. 
The course application must include a description of the 
proposed honors course that emphasizes participatory 
classroom styles, intense and in-depth study of subject 
matter, the use of primary source material, team or group 
teaching, an interdisciplinary theme, and an element of 
independent study. Honors courses include intensive 
reading, writing, and research. Faculty are encouraged 
to offer courses encouraging civic responsibility, global 
awareness, service learning, or community service. All 
honors courses are limited to a maximum enrollment of 
20 students. 

Priority enrollment in honors courses is given to 
students in the Honors Program, but students meeting 
the admission criteria for the Honors Program may enroll 
in honors courses with permission of the Director of the 
Honors Program and the approval of faculty teaching the 
courses. 



Honors Sections of Regular Courses or Labs 
(0-4 credit hours) 

An open call for honors courses is issued each 
semester to faculty. Proposals are reviewed by the Honors 
Faculty Council and approved through the course approval 
process outlined in the Faculty Manual. 

Courses designated as honors courses can substitute 
for non-honors courses. Honors courses cover the same 
material as regular courses, but they must be different 
from regular courses by requiring coursework that is more 
challenging and enriching for honors students. Honors 
sections may involve a different teaching approach, 
additional readings, or special requirements. Course 
descriptions for honors sections must show greater rigor, 
more in-depth study, higher expectations, intensive 
reading, writing, and research than non-honors courses. 
Honors courses are not necessarily taught every semester, 
although some courses may be offered regularly. 

Special Honors Courses (1-3 credit hours) 

An open call for special, one-time-only honors 
courses is issued each semester to faculty. Proposals are 
reviewed and approved by the Honors Faculty Council 
and the standard approval process for one-time-only 
courses. 

Special honors courses may substitute for regular 
courses or may be new courses. Special honors courses 
cover topics not covered in existing courses, allow faculty 
to experiment with new teaching methods, incorporate 
new ideas, take risks, introduce cutting-edge material, 
and develop individual research. Course descriptions 
must show greater rigor, more in-depth study, higher 
expectations, more intensive reading, writing, and 
research than non-honors courses. 

Special honors courses may meet general education, 
major, cognate/minor, or elective requirements. Honors 
Faculty Advisors recommend to deans course substitutions 
that allow incorporation of honors courses into the 
curriculum. 

HONS 101. First Year Honors Experience 
(3 credit hours) 

First Year Honors Experience is a facilitated seminar 
course taught by multiple faculty with an interdisciplinary 
theme. The First Year Honors Experience is required of 
all first year honors students. Faculty members propose 
the theme of the course and outline the fomiat of the 
class. Courses must include intensive reading, writing, 
and research. 

The First Year Honors Experience may meet general 
education, cognate/minor, or elective requirements. 
Honors Faculty Advisors recommend to deans course 
substitutions that allow incorporation of honors courses 
into the curriculum. 

HONS 102. Chancellor 's Honors Seminar 
(1-3 credit hours) 

The Chancellor's (or Vice-Chancellor's) Honors 
Seminar is a seminar taught by the Chancellor or the 
Executive Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs. 
HONS 301. Honors Colloquium 
(300-level or higher) (3 credit hours) 



Honors Program 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



71 



The Honors Colloquium is a facilitated course taught 
by multiple faculty. The course has an interdisciplinary 
theme. Faculty members propose the theme of the course 
and outline the format of the class, give assignments, and 
evaluate students. Course must include intensive reading, 
writing, and research. Upper-level and transfer students 
who do not complete the First Year Honors Experience 
must enroll in the Honors Colloquium. Honors students 
who complete the First Year Honors Experience may 
enroll in the Honors Colloquium for honors credit. The 
Honors Colloquium may be repeated once if the theme 
of the Colloquium changes. 

The Honors Colloquium may meet general education, 
major, cognate/minor, or elective requirements. Honors 
Faculty Advisors recommend to chairs, deans, or the 
general education committee course substitutions 
that allow incorporation of honors courses into the 
curriculum. 

HONS 399. Honors Independent Study (3-4 credit hours) 

Directed research and reading of a complex and 
extensive nature in keeping with the student's major 
interests. A written report or work is required at the end of 
the term. Research involves both primary and secondary 
sources. Consent of the Director of the Honors Program. 
May be repeated with the consent of the Director of the 
Honors Program for a total of no more than eight hours of 
undergraduate Honors credit. A university contract must 
be completed with all required signatures. 

HONS 401. Honors Thesis (3-6 credit hours) 

To graduate from the Honors Program, a student 
must complete a final thesis or project as an independent 
tutorial directed by an appropriate faculty member chosen 
by the student and approved by the Director of the Honors 
Program. Students are eligible for the Honors thesis or 
project when they accumulate a minimum of 12 honors 
credits. Begun as early as the junior year, the thesis or 
project must be completed and submitted to the Director 
of the Honors Program in the senior year. After approval 
by the Honors Faculty Council, students must present the 
thesis or project to a public audience. Honors theses are 
filed in the Journal of Honors Papers. 

The honors thesis or project may help to fulfill the 
requirement of the Senior Seminar in honors students" 
major disciplines; students work with faculty members 
directing the thesis or seminar and with the faculty 
member teaching the senior seminar to determine its 
feasibility. 

The honors thesis or project may meet general 
education, major, cognate/minor, or elective requirements. 
Honors Faculty Advisors recommend deans course 
substitutions that allow incorporation of honors courses 
into the curriculum. 

Faculty members who act as advisors for honors 
students completing honors theses or projects receive 
course release time according to the university policy on 
faculty release time. 

Orientation and Advising 

The Director of the Honors Program assists the 
academic Chair or Dean in identifying at least one faculty 



advisor in each academic unit to advise honors students 
in the unit. The Honors Program provides an advising 
workshop to honors advisors each semester. 

Extracurricular Activities 

The Honors Program sponsors a full range of 
activities open to both honors students and the entire 
university community. Such activities include new honors 
student luncheons; guest lecturers and speakers; coffees 
with use Upstate faculty lectures; field trips; cultural 
events; dinners at faculty houses; receptions; Honors Day 
ceremonies; and research symposia. 

Special Benefits 

Benefits for honors students include availability of the 
Honors House, participation in honors activities, priority 
registration, faculty research mentors, library privileges, 
and the opportunity to attend Honorary Society meetings. 
Students graduating in the Honors Program receive special 
notation on their diplomas and transcripts, an Honors 
Certificate, and special recognition at graduation. Honors 
students are identified by a stole at graduation. The name 
of each honors graduate is engraved on a plaque displayed 
at the Honors House. 

Honors Faculty Council 

The Honors Faculty Council is a committee of seven 
use Upstate faculty members. Four of the members are 
elected by the faculty at-large at the last general faculty 
meeting of the year. Three of the members are appointed 
by the Director of the Honors Program in consultation 
with the Executive Chancellor for Academic Affairs. The 
Director of the Honors Program is an ex officio member. 
The Council elects its own chair. Terms are for three 
years. Initial terms are staggered with the length of term 
determined by lot. 

The Council makes recommendations on admissions, 
faculty, honors courses, honors requirements, means 
of assessment, and other matters related to the Honors 
Program, in accord with faculty governance procedures. 
The Council forms the examination committee for the 
honors thesis or experimental project. At the last general 
faculty meeting each year, the Chair of the Council 
provides a report on the status of the Honors Program. 
The report includes the numbers of students enrolled in the 
program, the numbers of students eligible for participation 
in the Honors Program, the number of honors courses 
offered ( including the type of course, i.e.. honors sections, 
one-time-only), the number of faculty who taught honors 
courses, and the number of academic units represented by 
the faculty who taught in the honors program. 

Honors Student Council 

The Honors Student Council is an honor student 
committee serving as a liaison with the Honors Faculty 
Council. The Honors Student Council represents the needs 
and concerns of honors students to the Honors Faculty 
Council and the Director of the Honors Program. The 
Honors Student Council assists the Director in arranging 
academic, social, cultural, and service activities. 



72 



Honors Program 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 




Academic Centers 



Center for Interdisciplinary Studies 

Recognizing the growing economic and cultural diversity oTthe Upstate region of South Carolina, interdisciplinary 
studies (IDS) provides students the opportunity to concentrate in a single discipline, combine course work from two or more 
disciplines, or develop an individualized curriculum based on personal interests, the desire for self-improvement, career 
advancement, or in preparation for study in a profession such as law or medicine. Addressed is the mature student with 
clearly defined educational goals. Students with a variety of courses from other colleges and universities, but who fail to 
have adequate credits for a traditional degree, may also find opportunities in the IDS program offered on the USC Upstate 
campus and at the University Center of Greenville. The program conforms to all general university academic regulations. 

The interdisciplinary studies program permits students to apply credits earned through independent study toward the 
degree. Students may also be permitted to apply up to 30 semester hours earned in correspondence courses, the U.S. Armed 
Forces Institute, selected college-level examination programs, and off-campus extension classes in partial fulfillment of the 
degree. Students desiring a postgraduate professional degree should note the requirements for a baccalaureate after three 
undergraduate years and one year of professional school outlined under the Three-Plus-One Program in this catalog. 

Admission 

IDS program applicants must: 

• be admitted to USC Upstate, and have earned 30 or more semester hours in transfer; 

• have earned 30 or more semester hours at USC Upstate and/or in transfer;' 

• complete the IDS program application; 

• if currently enrolled in another degree program at USC Upstate, obtain a signed change of major form in the office of the 
academic dean; 

• have a minimum grade point average of 2.0 on all courses to be considered for program admission; 

• choose a concentration option from 1 ) single discipline, 2) bidisciplinary, 3) multidisciplinary or 4) individualized plan; 

• if an individualized program applicant, submit a 1-2 page typed statement of purpose, an indication of the grouping of courses 
that will be used to meet the concentration area requirements, and an approved endorsement by a faculty member;' 

• apply to the IDS Academic Affairs Committee for an individualized plan to be approved. - 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies 

Student Worksheet 

General Education Courses 



III. 



IV. 



Communication 

SEGLlOl andSEGL 102 6 

I^II^ SSPH201 3 

Mathematics 

One math course: 3 

SMTH 120, 121, 122, 126, 127 

141, 142,231 

One course from math, logic or statistics: 3 

SECO 291 ; SLGC 205, 207; SMTH 

102, 121, 122, 126, 127, 141, 142, 
202, 23 1; SPSY 225; SSOC 201 

information Technology 

SCSC 138, 150; SIMS 101 3 

Natural Science 

Two courses from the following (at least 7-8 

one with the associated lab) 

SAST lll/L;SBIO 101/L, 102/L, 

1 10/L, 206, 240, 242/L, 270; SCHM 

lOI/L, 105, 106, 107, 109/L, 111/L, 
1 1 2/L; SGEG 20 1 , 202; SGEL 1 1 /L, 
102/L, 103/L, 120, 121, 123/L, 131; 
SPHS 101/L,201/L,202/L,211/L,212/L 



V. Arts and Humanities 

One fine arts course: 3 

SAAS 204; SATH 101, 105, 106; 

SMUS 110, 140;STHE 161, 170 

One course from the following: (no more 3 

than 3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 

101, 105, 106; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 283, 289, 
290, 291; SFLM 240, 341, 342, 475, 481; SMUS 110, 
140; SPHL 102,211; SREL 103; STHE 161, 170 

VI. Foreign Language and Culture 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 3 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

Placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course** (Students placing 
into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in electives, 
if hours are required in the major). 

Continued on next page 

' For further information on accx'pfahle credit, see the 
transfer credit section in this catalog. 

'Final acceptance into the individualized plan requires 
approval of the IDS Academic Affairs Committee. 



74 



USC Upstate Academic Centers 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



VII. History 



SHST 101, 102, 105, or 106 



Qprion 3 - Multidisciplinarv 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

Two courses from the following with 

two disciplines represented: 

SANT102;SAAS201;SECO221, 

222;SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201,301 
320;SPSY101;SSOC 101;SWST101 



Concentration' 

(25-29 hours of junior- and senior- level courses 
as outlined in the options below) 



Option 1 - Single Discipline 



Courses are selected from 25-29 

a single discipline in which USC Upstate does 
not currently offer a major; must include a methods or 
theory course where required by the discipline, and must 
include a senior seminar selected from an allied area and 
approved by an advisor; B.A. or B.S. determined by the 
discipline 



Option 2 - Bidisciplinary 



Primary discipline ( must 15-21 

include a methods or theory course where 
required by the discipline and must include a 
senior seminar); B.A. or B.S. option determined 
by the primary discipline 



Secondary discipline 



8-10 



Courses are selected from a single group 
concentration area with three disciplines 
represented. The minimum junior- and senior- 
level hour requirements for the three disciplines 
are as follows: 



Primary discipline 



12-13 



(must include a methods or theory course where 
required by the discipline) 



Second discipline 



Third discipline 6 

Senior seminar (to be selected 1 -4 
from one of the three areas or 
an interdisciplinary senior seminar 
from that group 



Group Concentration Areas for Option 3 

Social Sciences (criminal justice, economics, 
geography, government, history, logic, 
philosophy, psychology, recreation/health, 
religion, sociology; B.A. degree) 

Humanities (art, English, foreign language, 
history, journalism, logic, music, 
philosophy, religion, speech, theatre; 
B.A. degree) 

Sciences and Analysis (astronomy, biology, 
chemistry, computer science, geology, logic, 
mathematics, physics, statistics; B.S. degree) 

Applied Emphasis (business/economics or 
foundations of education would be used as one 
of the disciplines in conjunction with two 
disciplines from one of the above groups; 
B.A. or B.S. degree detemiined by the 
combination of disciplines selected) 



'See academic regulations at the end of this section. 



USC Upstate Academic Centers 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



75 



Option 4 - Individualized ' 

A program of study which 
includes a methods or theory course 
and a senior seminar from the same 
area; B.A. or B.S. determined by 
primary emphasis 



Electives 



32-37 



25-29 



Junior and Senior Level Hours^ 12 



Total Hours Required 



120 



'See program admission requirements for details 

-See cognate section of this catalog and IDS program 
academic regulations. 



Academic Regulations 

A minimum of 120 semester hours (including hours meeting the general education requirement, course grade 

requirement, junior and senior level hours requirement, and area of concentration requirement) must be completed 

with a grade point average of 2.0 or better. 

Course work completed prior to acceptance into the interdisciplinary studies program is not automatically accepted 

as part of a degree program. Such work is reevaluated to determine if it is applicable to the student's program. 

A minimum of 30 semester hours must be completed in residence at USC Upstate after acceptance into the IDS 

program. 

Developmental courses do not count toward the 120-hour degree requirements. 

All course work within a concentration is selected in conjunction with a faculty advisor assigned from the primary 

or first discipline in the concentration area. Specific required course work is listed on a program of study which 

is then approved by the director of the IDS program and the dean of arts and sciences. 

All concentration hours must be junior- and senior-level work completed in residence at USC Upstate. 

A minimum of 1 5 hours of the concentration must be taken after the completed IDS application has been received 

in the IDS office. 

No course may simultaneously meet the general education and concentration hour requirements. 

Technical, non-college parallel, and military science courses may not be used to satisfy the concentration hour 

requirement. 

A maximum of 30 semester hours of upper and lower level courses (including transfer work) may be taken in 

business administration and economics (excluding Economics 221 and 222). 

Prior course work transferred from another four-year institution may be used to fulfill the junior- and senior-level 

hours requirement. 

A minimum grade of C is required in each course used to fulfill the concentration area requirements and the 

12-hour junior- and senior-level requirement. 



76 



USC Upstate Academic Centers 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Center for Nonprofit Leadership 



The Bachelor of Arts in Nonprofit Administration prepares graduates for careers in management and administrative 
positions within a wide variety of nonprofit organizations such as social services, youth activities, health, the environment, 
and the arts. The major combines an academic focus with an experiential learning approach, giving students an advantage 
in competing for positions in the "Third Sector" — a term that distinguishes nonprofit from the business and government 
sectors. The Bachelor of Arts in Nonprofit Administration is a multidisciplinary degree which builds upon a strong general 
education foundation and a core of nonprofit courses. It draws upon disciplines such as business, sociology, psychology, 
government and communications to give students a well-rounded education. 

Basic leadership and management principles are stressed in the major courses, including strategic planning, board 
and committee development, nonprofit financial administration, assessment, marketing, volunteer recruitment and coordi- 
nation, grant writing, special event planning, and risk management. In addition to actual supervised work experiences in a 
nonprofit organization, students receive a solid grounding in the history and philosophy of philanthropy and the nonprofit 
sector in the United States. 

use Upstate is affiliated with American Humanics (AH), a national alliance of colleges, universities and nonprofit 
organizations dedicated to preparing undergraduates for careers in nonprofit leadership. The Bachelor of Arts in Nonprofit 
Administration includes the competencies required by AH for national certification. Other certification requirements include 
active participation in the American Humanics Student Association and attendance at one AH Management Institute. 



Bachelor of Arts 

Major in Nonprofit Administration 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Courses 

I. Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



SSPH 201 



One course from the following: (no more 3 

than 3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 

101, 105, 106;SEGL250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 283, 289, 
290, 291; SFLM 240, 341, 342, 475, 481; SMUS 110, 
140; SPHL 102,211; SREL 103; STHE 161, 170 



III. 



IV. 



Matliematics 6-7 

One math course: 

SMTH 120, 121, 122, 126, 127 

141, 142 
One course from math, logic or statistics: 
SMTH 102; SPSY 225; SSOC 201 

Information Technology 3 

SCSC 138, 150; SIMS 101 

Natural Science 7-8 

Two courses fi-om the following (at least 

one with the associated lab) 

SAST 111/L;SB10 lOI/L, 102/L, 

1 1 0/L, 206, 240, 242/L, 270; SCHM 

101/L, 105, 106, 107, 109/L, 111/L, 
112/L;SGEG201,202;SGEL 101/L, 
102/L, 103/L, 120, 121, 123/L, 131; 
SPHS 101/L, 201/L, 202/L, 21 1/L, 
212/L 



VI. Foreign Language and Culture 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

Placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course (Students placing 
into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in 
electives, if hours are required in the 
major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101, 102, 105, or 106 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 



SGIS201 
SSOC 101 



V. Arts and Humanities 

One fine arts course: 

SAAS 204; SATH 10 

SMUS 



105, 106; 
10, 140; STHE 161, 170 



'Minimum grade ofC required 



use Upstate Academic Centers 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



77 



Major Requirements' 

SNPA 301 : The nonprofit sector 

in the U.S. 

SNPA 302: Nonprofit Admin. 

SNPA 303: Nonprofit Financial 

Administration 
SNPA 304: Fund Raising for 

Nonprofit Organizations 

SNPA 499: Nonprofit Internship 

SBAD350orSBAD371 

SBAD 374: Management of 

Human Resources 
SPSY 302, 303, 304, 305, 307, 308 

309,310,311,330,350,351,442 

or 460 
SSPH301,310, 315, 333,448, or 

450 
SSOC311,320, 321,323, 325, 

333,335, 337, or 341 

SNPA 495: Senior Seminar 



Nonprofit majors may select a cognate 
(12 hours) or a minor (18-21 hours) 



Cognate' 12 

(Courses selected in conjunction with advisor) 



3 


(Courses selected in conjunction with advisor) 


3 




3 








3 








3 

3 


Supporting Courses 


3 


SPSY 101 Intro to Psychology 3 




SBAD 225 Financial Accounting 3 


3 


SEGL 245 Professional Writing 3 




SAMS 101, 102; SHST 110, 302, 3 


3 


306,311 or 321 

SEGL 371 Grant Writing 3 


3 


Electives 7-17 


3 














Total Hours Required 120 



'Minimum grade ofC required 



Minor in Nonprofit Administration 
Student Worksheet 



Minor Requirements' 

SSOC 101 -Introduction to Sociology 3 

SNPA 301-The Nonprofit Sector 3 

in the United States 
SNPA 302-lntroduction to 3 

Nonprofit Administration 
SNPA 303-Nonprofit Financial 3 

Administration 
SNPA 304-Fundraising for 3 

Nonprofit Organizations or 

SEGL 371 Grant Writing 
SNPA 499-Intemship in 3 

Nonprofit Administration 



Total Hours Required 



18 



'Up to 3 hours of General Education (less than 300-level) 
may be used to satisfy requirements of a minor Minimum 
grade ofC is required for all coursework. 



78 



use Upstate Academic Centers 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Center for Women *s & Gender Studies 

The Center for Women's & Gender Studies serves students, faculty, staffand community members through curricular 
and co-curricular programming, resource and referral services, advocacy efforts, and training activities on women- and 
gender-related issues. The CWSP serves as the coordinating site for coursework in Women's Studies. USC Upstate offers 
a minor in Women's Studies. Specific requirements for the minor are listed below. 



Minor in Women's Studies' 
Student Worksheet 



Introductory Course^ 

1 SWST 101: 3 

Introduction to Women's Studies 



Theory Course 

SWST 301: Feminist Theory 

and Methods 



3 



Additional Courses 12 

12 credit hours from the following list, with no more 
than two courses from any individual discipline (except 
SWST). and no more than one course from within the 
students' major program (cannot be counted toward 
both the major and minor).' 



□ 


SATH301: 


Women and Art 


□ 


SCRJ 376: 


Women and Crime 


□ 


SEGL437: 


Women Writers 


□ 


SGIS 350: 


Women and American Politics 



'Minimum grade of "C "for all courses required. 

-Courses may- also be used to satisfy general education 
requirements. If used for general education, students will 
have satisfied the requirement for the minor and will be 
excused from the credit hour requirements for the 
preparatory course. 

^With the written approval of a Women s Studies faculty 
member, students may apply relevant special topics 
courses, one-time only courses, internships and independent 
studies to the minor 



SGIS 420: Women and Politics: 

A Global Perspective 

SHST 351: Women in 

Early Modem Europe and America 

SHST 352: Women in Modem Europe 

and America 

SHST 495: Topics in Women's History 

SPSY 442: Psychology of Women 

SSOC 435: Sociology of Women 

SWST 355: U.S. Women's Movement 

SWST 398: Special Topics in 

Women's Studies 

SWST 490: Senior Seminar in 

Women's Studies 

Total Hours Required 



18 



USC Upstate Academic Centers 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



79 



Watershed Ecology Center 



Serving the upstate metropolitan region of South Carohna, the Watershed Ecology Center collects, analyzes, and 
disseminates sound scientific information on the ecology of the region. The Center places special emphasis on watershed 
conservation, water quality, and the study of organisms living in the area encompassed by a watershed. 

The Center serves as a repository for regional ecological information, providing education and research assistance to 
individuals, communities, and governmental organizations. The Center is also dedicated to providing research opportunities 
for the faculty and students at the University of South Carolina Upstate. 

Watershed Ecology Center - Research 

• Water Quality * Biodiversity Studies • Population Studies 

Pacolet River Cowpens Battlefield Nerodia (Water Snakes) 

Lawson's Fork King's Mountain Turtles (Duncan Park, Spartanburg 

Upper Broad River 

Watershed Ecology Center - Sen'ice 

Education programs are provided for the Spartanburg Water System, Startex, Jasper, Duncan Water District, Greer Public 
Works and Spartanburg County. 

Watershed Ecology Center - Educational Programs 

Under the direction of Dr. Jack Turner, the Watershed Ecology Center began its educational outreach program in 2001, 
serving students in K-8th grade. Each year the Center contacts more than 10,000 students in Spartanburg County and 
offers a variety of water-related, grade-specific programs designed to meet and correlated to the South Carolina science 
standards, including: 

Hurray for Habitats! (First grade) 

This hands-on program uses live animals to introduce students to the concept of habitat and the need to preserve our 

local aquatic habitats. 

Water, Water Everywhere (Second grade) 

In this activity from Access Nature, participants raise their awareness about how little water is actually available for 
human use, discuss how humans use water, and formulate ideas to conserve water. Two hands-on activities reinforce 
concepts covered. 

Marsh Munchers (Third grade) 

This program uses a salt marsh as an example of the interconnectedness of aquatic ecosystems. The program teaches the 

concepts of food webs, camouflage, and mimicry through a fun Project Wild Aquatic game involving the entire class. 

The Water Cycle - An Incredible Journey (Fourth grade) 

Through the use of an engaging game from the Project Wet curriculum, students are challenged to answer questions like 

"Where will the water you drink today, be tomorrow?" in their quest to understand the water cycle. 

Wise up About Watersheds (Fifth grade) 

In this hands-on program, students learn about the watershed we live in and are introduced to the concept of non-point 
source water pollution. Using "Waste Not, Want Not" from the Water Sourcebook curriculum and the EnviroScape 
watershed model, students see how a watershed becomes polluted as each student is asked to add various pollutants to 
the models. 

Talkin ' Trash (Sixth grade) 

Using an EnviroScape landfill model, students get an in-depth look at how a landfill is designed. They learn about what 
happens to their garbage when it leaves the curb. They will also be introduced to the innovative process of converting 
waste to energy used by BMW and Waste Management. 

From H to OH! (Seventh & eighth grades) 

In this activity from Healthy Water Healthy People, students simulate the creation of acids and bases; manipulate acidic 
and basic solutions and discuss how acid rain is formed. Students explore runoff pollution and how pH of water can 
affect weathering of the Earth's surface and stream health. 

Other educational outreach programs of the Watershed Ecology Center include: Rocks Speak, H20 Below. Macro 
What? and Green Driver, where high school students learn about the environmental responsibilities associated with 
driving a car, with particular emphasis on changing their oil. 

BO use Upstate Academic Centers 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 




College of Arts and Sciences 



The College of Arts and Sciences is comprised of the following academic units: Department of Fine Arts and Communi- 
cation Studies; Department of Languages, Literature and Composition; Department of Informatics; Division of Mathematics 
and Computer Science; Division of Natural Sciences and Engineering; Department of Psychology; Department of History, 
Political Science, Philosophy and American Studies and Department of Sociology, Criminal Justice and Women's Studies. 
The College of Arts and Sciences, as the cornerstone of the University of South Carolina Upstate, provides curricula for the 
general education requirements and for diverse liberal arts and sciences majors. Consistent with the University's mission, 
the college provides opportunities for students to; 

• acquire proficiency in communications and mathematics; 

• develop the ability to reason, critically and ethically; 

• obtain historical, scientific, social and cultural perspectives; 

attain a high level of scholarship in the humanities and sciences degree programs; and 

• regard learning as a continuing process of intellectual growth. 

Enrichment programs resulting from these educational endeavors of the College of Arts and Sciences benefit the intel- 
lectual and cultural life of the entire community. 

Fine Arts and Communication Studies 

The aim of the Department of Fine Arts and Communication Studies (FACS) is to support the overall mission of USC 
Upstate by enhancing the intellectual, ethical, cultural and professional development of fine arts and communication students. 
The faculty is committed to preparing students to become competent professionals in art, media arts, journalism and mass 
communication, music, speech communication and theatre. FACS offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in communication 
with concentrations in electronic media, journalism and mass communication, speech and theatre as well as the Bachelor 
of Fine Arts in art studio with an emphasis in graphic design and a Bachelor of Arts in Art Education (pending approval). 



Bachelor of Arts 

Major in Communication 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Requirements 

I. Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL102 



SSPH 201 



III. 



IV. 



Mathematics & Logic 6-8 

One math course: 

SMTH 120, 121, 122, 126, 127 

141, 142,231 

One additional math, logic or statistics course: 

SECO 29 1 ; SLGC 205, 207; SMTH 

102, 121, 122, 126, 127, 141, 142, 
202, 231; SPSY225; SSOC 201 

Information Technology 3 

SCSC 138, 150; SIMS 101 

Natural Science 7-8 

Two courses from the following (at least 

one with the associated lab) 

SAST 111/L;SB10 101/L, 102/L, 

1 1 0/L, 206, 240, 242/L, 270; SCHM 

101/L, 105, 106, 107, 109/L, 111/L, 
112/L; SGEG 201, 202; SGEL 101/L, 
102/L, 103/L, 120, 121, 123/L, 131; 
SPHS 101/L,201/L,202/L,211/L, 
212/L 



V. Arts and Humanities 6 

One fine arts course: 

^ S AAS 204; S ATH 1 1 , 1 05, 1 06; 

SMUS 110, 140;STHE 161, 170 
One course from the following: (no more 
than 3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 

101, 105, 106; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 283, 289, 
290, 291; SFLM 240, 341, 342, 475, 481; SMUS 110, 
140; SPHL 102,211; SREL 103; STHE 161, 170 

VI. Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 or 

placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course** (Students placing 
into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in 
electives, if hours are required in the 
major). 



VII. History 



SHSTIOI. 102. 105, or 106 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

Two courses fi-om the following with two 
disciplines represented: 

SANT 102; SAAS 201; SECO 221, 

222; SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201, 301 

320; SPSY 101; SSOC 101; SWST 101 



Continued on next page 



82 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Major Requirements 

All students must complete the 
following six courses with a minimum 
grade of "C" 



18 



SSPH 301 ; Theories and Principles 

of Human Communication 

SSPH 340; Voice and Diction 

SJOU 305: Mass Communication Theory 

STHE 301 : Dramatic Theory and 

Criticism or STHE 385: Theatre 

History I or STHE 386: Theatre 

History II 

SCOM 375: Communication 

Research Methods 

SCOM 490: Senior Seminar 



Students must complete the required credit 
hours from either Group A: Theatre, Group B: Speech, 
Group C: Journalism or Group D: Electronic Media 
and earn a minimum grade of C in all courses. 

Group A: Theatre 

Students must take a minimum of 3 hours from 
each of the three following categories, an additional 3 
hours from either the technical or performance areas, 
and an additional 9 hours from any of the categories 
for a total of 21 hours. 

History. Theory. Writing and Literature: 3-12 



u 



□ 



a 



□ 



STHE 301: Dramatic Theory 

and Criticism (if not used to satisfy 

the Communication core requirement) 

STHE 378: Playwriting 

STHE 385: Theatre History I 

(if not used to satisfy the Communication 

core requirement) 

STHE 386: Theatre History 11 

(if not used to satisfy the Communication 

core requirement) 



STHE 405 
STHE 406 
SEGL422 



Shakespeare Survey 
Studies in Shakespeare 
Modem Drama 



Technical and Production: 



3-15 



□ 

□ 



STHE 377 
STHE 379 
STHE 380 
STHE 381 



Performance: 



□ 

□ 
□ 

□ 
□ 

□ 
□ 



STHE 370 
STHE 373 
STHE 374 
STHE 376 
STHE 382 
STHE 383 
STHE 401 
STHE 402: 
STHE 473 



Stagecraft 
Lighting Design 
Scene Design 
Stage Management 

3-15 
Voice for the Actor 
Play Directing 
Intermediate Acting 
Stage Movement 
Theatre for Youth 
Stage Combat 
: Classical Styles in Acting 
Altemative Styles in Acting 
: Advanced Play Directing 



Note: STHE 398: Selected Topics in Theatre 
or STHE 399: Internship or Independent 
Study in Threatre may be used in any category, 
ij appropriate. 

Group B: Speech 

Students must complete a minimum of 3 hours 
from the following categories, an additional course 
from the Skills area and from the Theory area, and 
one additional course from the category list for a total 
of 21 credit hours. 

Writing : 3 

□ SSPH 333: Advanced Public Speaking 

□ SJOU 334: Writing for Broadcasting 

□ SEGL318: Writing and Computers 

Professional Practices: 3 



□ SJOU 303: Law and Ethics of Mass 
Media 

□ SSPH 303: Ethics in Human 
Communication 

G SCOM 375: Communication Research 
Methods 

Skills: 



□ SSPH 310: Interpersonal Communication 

□ SSPH 415: Mediation 

□ SSPH415L: Mediation Laboratory 

□ SJOU 325: Speech for Radio and 
Television 

G SCOM 399: Internship or Independent 
Study in Mass Communication (may be 
counted only once) 

□ SSPH 440: Argumentation & Debate 

□ SSPH 441: Debate Laboratory 

G SIMS 345: Technical Presentation and 
Communication 

Theory : 6 

□ SSPH 315: Conflict Resolution: 
Application & Strategies 

□ SSPH 398: Topics in Speech 
Communication (Rhetorical Theory) 

□ SSPH 448: Organizational 
Communication 

□ SSPH 450: Communicating for Social 
Change 

□ SIMS 346: Communication and New 
Technology 

One additional course 3 

from the above categories 

Note: SSPH 398: Topics in Speech 
Communication may be used in any category 
with approval of advisor 

Group C: Journalism 

Students must take all journalism core courses 
with a minimum of three hours from each of the follow- 
ing four catagories for a total of 24 credit hours. 

Journalism Core: 9 

Q SJOU 20 1 : Survey of Mass Communication 

□ SJOU 303: Law & Ethics of the Mass Media 

□ SJOU 304: Writing for the Media 

Continued on next page 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



83 



Writing: 6-9 

SJOU 329: Public Relations Writing 

SJOU 333: Newswriting and 

Reporting 

SJOU 334: Writing for Broadcasting 

SJOU 335: Feature Writing 

History and Theory: 3-9 

SJOU 302: History of Journalism 

SJOU 310: Mass Media and Society 

SJOU 424: History of American 

Broadcasting 

SJOU 480: Minorities and the Media 

Film: 3-9 

SFLM 342: Film Genre 
SFLM 360: Film Directors 
SFLM 425: Film History to 1967 
SFLM 435: Film History since 1967 
SFLM 475: International Film 
SFLM 481: Cultural Diversity and 
Difference in Film 
□ SFLM 482: Film Theory and Criticism 
Note: SJOU 398: Special Topics in Journalism 
may be used in any category if appropriate. 

3-12 



Professional Options: 

SJOU 325: Speech 

for Radio and Television 

SFLM 326: Motion Picture and 

Video Techniques 

SJOU 328: Public Relations and 

Persuasion 

SFLM 426: Advanced Video Production 

SJOU 430: Media Management 

SCOM 399: Internship (may be taken 

twice with appropriate consent) 

SBAD 350: Principles of Marketing 

SART 214: Graphic Design I 

SART 261 : Introduction to Photography 

SART 314: Graphic Design II 

SART 315: Graphic Design III 

SART 361 : Photography II 

SART 461 : Photography III 

SEGL 318: Writing and Computers 

SIMS 345: Technical Presentation in 

Communications 

SIMS 346: Communication and New 

Technology 



Note: SJOU 398: Special Topics in Journalism 
may be used in any category if appropriate. 



U 
U 

u 

u 
u 
u 
u 
u 
u 
u 

G 
U 



Group D: Electronic Media 
Students must take a minimum of 3 hours from 
each of the following categories, and all electronic 
media core courses for a total of 21 hours. 

Electronic Media Core: 9 

□ SJOU 20 1 : Survey of Mass Communication 

□ SJOU 303: Law & Ethics of Mass Media 

□ SJOU 304: Writing for the Media 



Media History &. Theory: 



3-9 



□ SJOU 310: Mass Media and Society 

□ SJOU 424: History of American Broadcasting 

□ SJOU 480: Minorities in the Media 

Note: SJOU 398: Special Topics in Journalism 
may be used in any category if appropriate. 



Film: 



3-9 



□ SFLM 342: Film Genre 

□ SFLM 360: Film Directors 

□ SFLM 425: Film History to 1967 

□ SFLM 435: Film History since 1967 

□ SFLM 475: International Film 

□ SFLM 48 1 : Cultural Diversity and 

Difference in Film 

□ SFLM 482: Film Theory and Criticism 
Note: SJOU 398: Special Topics in Journalism 
may be used in any category if appropriate. 

Professional Options: 9 

□ SJOU 325: Speech for Radio and Television 

□ SFLM 326: Motion Picture and Video 
Techniques 

□ SJOU 334: Writing for Broadcasting 

□ SFLM 426: Advanced Video Production 

□ SCOM 399: Internship or Independent Study 
in Mass Communication (may be taken twice) 

Q SIMS 345: Technical Presentations in 
Communication 

□ SIMS 346: Communication and New 
Technology 

Cognate' 12 21 

(with approval of advisor) or Minor 



Supporting Courses 

Any Foreign Culture course 200 3 

level or above 

Electives 6-20 



Total Hours Required 



120 



84 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Bachelor of Fine Arts Major in Art Studio 

with an Emphasis in Graphic Design 

Student Worksheet 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Art Studio with an emphasis in graphic design, is intended to prepare students for careers in 
graphic design as well as graduate work in graphic design. The program integrates the content areas of design theory, design production, 
design history, design criticism, and design aesthetics. 

As understanding the nature of a design problem is prerequisite to implementing any technical application, instruction provides a 
foundation in creativity, critical thinking and problem analysis. The program integrates traditional art techniques with computer technology 
and courses are offered in the exploration of new media design. Graduates from the BFA program are prepared to locate employment 
in creative departments in major corporations, retail stores, and advertising design or publishing finiis. Portfolio review is required for 
admission into the graphic design program. Deadlines and submission requirements for the portfolio may be obtained from the USC 
Upstate Admissions Office and the Department of Fine Arts and Communication Studies. 



General Education Courses 

I. Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



SSPH201 



6-8 



122, 126, 127 



Mathematics & Logic 

One math course: 
SMTH 120, 121 

141, 142,231 
One course from math, logic or slatistics: 
SECO 291; SLGC 205, 207; SMTH 

102, 120, 121. 122, 126, 127, 141. 

202, 23 1 ; SPSY 225; SSOC 201 



III. 



IV. 



Information Technology 

SCSC 138, 150; SIMS 



01 



7-8 



V. 



Natural Science 

Two courses from the fr)llowmg (at least 

one with the associated lab) 

SAST111/L;SBI0 101/L, 102/L, 

1 1 0/L, 206, 240, 242/L, 270; SCHM 

101/L, 105, 106, 107, 109/L, 111/L, 
112/L;SGEG201,202;SGEL 101/L, 
102/L, 103/L, 120, 121, 123/L, 131; 
SPHS 101/L, 201/L,202/L, 21 1/L,212/L 

Arts & Humanities 6 

One fine arts course: 

SATH 105 or SATH 106 

One course from the following: (no more 
than 3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 1 01,1 02; SEGL250, 

252, 275, 279, 280, 283, 289, 290, 291; SFLM 240, 341, 
342,475.481; SMUS 110, 140; SPHL 102, 211;SREL 
103;STHE 161, 170 

VI. Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 

SFRn''102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

Placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course** (Students placing 
into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in electives, 
if hours are required in the major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101. 102. 105, or 106 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

Two courses from the following with two 

disciplines represented: 

SANT 102; SAAS 201; SECO 221, 

222;SGEG 101, 103; SG1S201, 301 
320; SPSY 101; SSOC 101; SWST 101 



Major Requirements' 
Art History 

SATH 105: History of Western 3 

Art: Pre-History-Middle Ages 
SATH 106: History of Western 
Art: Renaissance-Present 

SATH 306: Histoty of 20th 3 

Century Art or (with advisor approval 
another upper-level art history may be 
substituted for SATH 306) 

Art history elective 3 

with advisor approval any 200-leve! 
or above SATH course not repeated 
from the major requirements 



Art Studio 

S ART 1 03 : Fundamentals of 

Two Dimensional Design 
SART 104: Fundamentals of 

Three Dimensional Design 

SART 108: Computer Graphics I 

SART 110: Drawing I 

SART 203 : Color & Composition 

SART 206: Illustration I 

SART 210: Drawing II 

SART 214: Graphic Design 1 

SART 23 1 : Introduction to 

Life Drawing 
SART 26 1 : Introduction to 

Photography or SART 262; 

Digital Photography 

SART 3 1 8 : Interface Design I 

SART 314: Graphic Design II 

SART 315: Graphic Designing 

SART 414: Graphic Design IV 

Electives in art studio with 

advisor approval any 200-level or 

above SART course not repeated 

from the requirements 
'a minimum grade ofC is required in major courses. 
■Students must successfully pass portfolio review to register 



for SART 3 15. 



Continued on next page 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



85 



Supporting Courses 

" SBAD 350: Principles of Marketing 3 

SJOU 201: Survey of Mass 3 

Communication or SJOU 310: Mass 
Media and Society 



Professional Options 
(Students choose 12 credits from the 
following list of courses. At least 6 
hours must be 300 level and above. 

SART205: Digital Art I 

SART 207: Printmaking 1 

SART 211: Introduction to Painting 

SART 350: Art Study Abroad 

SART 305: Digital Art II 

SART 306: Illustration II 

SART 3 10: Drawing III 

SART 311: Painting II 



12 



SART 312: Painting 111 

SART 450: Art Study Abroad 11 

_SART 361: Photography II 
SART 362: Photography III 
SART 391 : Motion Graphic Design 
SART 410: Drawing IV 

_SART 418: Interface Design II 
SART 499: Art Studio Internship 



Senior Seminar 

SART 489: Senior 
Portfolio Development 
SART 490: Senior Seminar 
Graphic Design 



Total Hours Required 



127 



Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art Studio with Emphasis in Graphic Design 
Recommended Curriculum Schedule 

Portfolio Review for acceptance into major. 
Freshman Year — Fall 



*SART 1 04-Fundamentals of Three Dimensional Design 

*SART 110-Drawingl 

SATH 105-History of Western Art: Pre-History-Middle 

Ages (Group V) 

English 101 

Math & Logic 

*should be taken in year 1. 

Freshman Year — Spring 

*SART 103-Fundamentals of Two Dimensional Design 

*SART 108-Computer Graphics I 

SATH 106-History of Western Art: Renaissance-Present 

English 102 

Information Technology (Group III) 

*should be taken in year 1. 

Freshman Year — Summer 

General Education (Group VII) 

Sophomore Year — Fall 

SART 203-Color and Composition 

SART 214-Graphic Design 1 

SATH 306-History of 20th Century Art 

Natural Science (Group IV) 

Foreign Language/Culture (Group VI) 

Sophomore Year — Spring 

SART210-Drawll 
SART 3 14-Graphic Design 11 
Social Science (Group Vlll) 
Math & Logic (Group II) 



Art Elective 

Sophomore Year — Summer 

SART 231 -Introduction to Life Drawing 



Junior Year — Fall 

SART 206-Illustration 1 
SART 315-Graphic Design 111 
SART 3 1 8-Interface Design I 
Natural Science (Group IV) 
Speech 201 

Junior Year — Spring 

SART 261 -Introduction to Photography or SART 262 

Digital Photography 

SART 414 Graphic Design IV 

SART Professional Option 

Social Science (Group VIII) 

Humanities (Group V) 

Senior Year — Fall 

SART 489-Senior Portfolio Development 
SART Professional Option 
SART Professional Option 
Art Elective 
Supporting Course 

Senior Year — Spring 

SART 490-Senior Seminar Graphic Design 
SART Professional Option Course 
SATH Art History Elective 
Art Elective 
Supporting Course 



86 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Bachelor of Arts in Art Education* 
Student Worksheet 

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in Art Education is intended to prepare students for careers as K-12 art teachers, for 
graduate work in art education and for employment in schools, museums, community art organizations and libraries. During 
the semester that a student completes 60 hours, he/she must apply to the Department of Fine Arts and Communication Studies 
to be admitted to the professional art education program which comprises his or her junior and senior years. Admission of 
applicants is based on individual consideration. Each applicant must fulfill the following requirements: 

Completion of English 1 1 and 1 02, Speech 20 1 and Art 1 03 or their equivalents, with grades of "C" or better; 

Successful completion of Math 121 or equivalent; 

GPA of at least 2.5 on at least 60 hours earned; 

The achievement of passing scores on all three sections of the Praxis Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST); 

Two letters of recommendation from faculty 

Clear criminal record from South Carolina Law Enforcement Division. 

When the student completes the required content course work and practicum hours, he/she will apply for admission 
to a directed (student) teaching course. The following criteria must be met: 

• Admission to the Professional Program 

• Mimimum 2.5 GPA 

• 90 semester hours completed (at end of the current semester) 

• 100 hours of practicum in the schools 

• A grade of "C" or better in the Professional Education courses 

• FBI fingerprint card 

Detailed guidelines and requirements may be obtained from the USC Upstate Admissions Office and the Department 
of Fine Arts and Communication Studies. 



General Education Requirements: 



I. Communication 

English 101 and 

Speech 201 



02 



II. Mathematics & Logic 

SMTH 121: College Algebra 

SMTH 102, 122, 126, 127, 141, 

142, 201, 231; SLGC 205, 207; 

SECO 291 ; SPSY 225; SSOC 201 

III. Information Technology 

Computer Science 138 

IV. Natural Science 

Two courses from the following: 

SAST 111/L; SBIO 101/L, 102/L 
1 10/L, 206, 240, 242/L, 270; SCHM 
101/L, 105, 106, 107, 109L/ 111/L, 
112/L;SGEG201,202;SGEL 101/L, 
102/L, 103/L, 120, 121, 123/L, 131; 
SPHS lOl/L, 201/L, 202/L, 211/L, 
212/L 



9 VI. Foreign Language and Culture 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 3 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

Placement in a 201 or higher level 
6-7 language course (Students placing 

into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in 
electives, if hours are required in the 
major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101, 102, 105, or 106 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 

One courses from the following: 

S ANT 1 02; S AAS 20 1 ; SECO 22 1 , 

222; SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201, 301 
320; SSOC 101;SWST101 
SPSY 101 



V. Arts and Humanities 

One fine arts course: 
SATH 105 

One course from the following: 
SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SEGL 250, 252, 



275, 279, 280, 283, 289, 290, 291; SFLM 240, 341, 
342,475,481;SMUS 110, 140; SPHL 102, 211;SREL 
103;STHE 161, 170 



Continued on next page 



College of IKrts and Sciences 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



87 



Content Concentration* (39 hours) 



SART 103 Fundamentals of Two Dimensional Design 

SATH 106 History of Western Art: Renaissance-Present 

SATH 306 History of 20th Century Art 

Art History elective 200 or above 

SART 104 Fundamentals of Three Dimensional Design 

SART 108 Computer Graphics I 

SART 110 Drawing I 

SART 210 Drawing II 

SART 2 1 1 Introduction to Painting 

SART 207 Printmaking I 

SART 229 Introduction to Crafts 

SART 203 Color and Composition 

Art Studio Elective 



Professional Education* (39 hours) 



SEDF 210 Foundations of Education** 
SAED 330 Foundations in Art Education** 
SEDF 333 Educational Development 
of the Lifelong Learner** 
SATH 307 Interpreting Art** 

_SAED 429 Art for Elementary 
and Middle Schools 

_SAED 430 Secondary Art Methods 
SAED 450 School Art Program 
SEDF 341 Education Procedures 
for Exceptional Children ** 

SAED 460 Directed Teaching 



3 
3 
3 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

15 



Total hours for major 



78 



Total credit hours for degree 



122-126 



*must have a "C" or above in the courses 

**Does not have to be admitted to the 
Professional Program 



'Pending approval of the South Carolina Commission on Higher 
Education and the Stale Department of Education. 



88 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Minor in Art History 
Student Worksheet 



Required Courses*'^'-^ 

SATH 105: History of Western Art: 3 

Prehistory - Middle Ages 
SATH 106: History of Western Art: 3 

Renaissance - Present 

Select four courses from the following: 12 

SATH 301 : Women and Art: Prehistory 

-Middle Ages 

SATH 304: Southern Folk Art 

SATH 305: American Art 

SATH 306: History of 20th Century Art 



SATH 308: 
^SATH 309: 

SATH 310: 
~SATH 350: 

SATH 352: 
"SATH 398: 

SATH 399: 

SATH 400: 
]SATH 450: 
SATH 499: 



History of Design 
History of Photography 
African Art 

Art History, Study Abroad 
Art History. Field Study 
Selected Topics in 
Art History 

Art History Independent 
Study 

Art History Methods 
Art History, Study Abroad II 
Art History Internship 



Minimum Hours Required 



18 



/ Up to 6 hours of General Education (<3Q0 level) may be used to satisfy requirements of a minor 

2 Minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 

i A minimum of 12 hours of upper division coursework is required. 



Minor in Journalism 
Student Worksheet 



Required Courses^ 

SJOU201: Survey of Mass 
Communication 


3 
3 
3 


Writing 

(one of the following) 

SJOU329, 333, 334, 335 


SJOU 303: Law & Ethics of the 




Mass Media 


Total Hours Required 


SJOU 304: Writing for the Media 





18 



Professional Options 

(one of the following) 

SJOU 325, SFLM 326, SJOU 328, SJOU 398, 

SCOM 399, SFLM 426. SJOU 430 



History and Theory 

(one of the following) 

SJOU 301, 302, 305, 310, 398, 424, 480 



'Minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



89 



Minor in Speech Communication 
Student Worksheet 



Required Courses^ 

SSPH 301: Theories and Principles 

of Human Communication 
SSPH 303: Ethics in Human 

Communication or SCOM 375: 

Communication Research Methods 
SSPH 333: Advanced Public Speaking 

or SSPH 340: Voice and Diction 
SJOU 325: Speech for Radio 

and Television or SIMS 345: 

Technical Presentation 

and Communication 
SSPH 310: Interpersonal Communication 

or SSPH 450: Communicating 

for Social Change 



SSPH 315: Conflict Resolution, 3 

SSPH 448: Organizational Communication 

or SIMS 346: Communication and 

Technology 

SSPH 440: Argumentation & Debate or 3 

SSPH 415: Mediation 



Total Hours Required 



21 



'Minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 



Minor in Theatre 
Student Worksheet 



Required Courses*'^'^''* 

STHE 161: Introduction to Theatre Art 3 

STHE 170: Fundamentals in Acting 3 

STHE 301: Dramatic Theory and 3 

Criticism or STHE 385: Theatre 

History 1 or STHE 386: Theatre History II 

STHE 377: Stagecraft 3 

or STHE 379: Lighting Design 
or STHE 380: Scene Design 

STHE 370: Voice for the Actor 3 

or STHE 376: Stage Movement for the 
Actor or STHE 383: Stage Combat or 
STHE 373: Fundamentals of Play Directing 

STHE 374: Intermediate Acting 3 

or STHE 401 : Classical Styles in Acting 
or STHE 402: Alternative Styles in Acting 
or STHE 378: Playwriting 



Minimum Hours Required 



18 



/ Up to 6 hours of General Education f<300 level) may be used to satisfy requirements of a minor. 

2 Minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 

3 A minimum of 12 hours of upper division coursework is required. 

4 Any course taken to sali.^fi' the requirements for the Communication major may not also be counted toward the requirements for the minor in Theatre. 



90 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Minor in Conflict Resolution ^'^'^''* 
Student Worksheet 



Requirements 

SSPH315: Conflict Resolution: 


3 
3 

1 


□ 


SSPH 415: Mediation 




(Prerequisite: SSPH 315) 

SSPH 415L: Mediation Laboratory 


□ 


(Prerequisite: SSPH 415) 


□ 



Students must complete 12 credit hours 
from either: 

Group A: Interpersonal Relations, 
Group B: Workplace Relations, or 
Group C: Legal/Law Relations 



Group A: Interpersonal Relations 

G SSPH 448: Organizational Communication 

(Prerequisite: SSPH 201) 

□ SPSY 307: Social Psychology 
(Prerequisite: SPSY 101) 

G SPSY 311: Industrial and Organizational 

Psychology (Prerequisite: SPSY 101) 

□ SPSY 420: Psychology of Men 
(Prerequisite: SPSY 101) 

□ SPSY 442: Psychology of Women 
(Prerequisite: SPSY 101) 

□ SSOC341: Sociology of Families 
(Prerequisite: SSOC 101) 

□ SSOC 381: Sociology of Aging 
(Prerequisite: SSOC 101) 

□ SSOC 433: Race and Ethnic Relations 
(Prerequisite: SSOC 101) 

□ SSOC 435: Sociology of Women 
(Prerequisite: SSOC 101) 

G SBAD 377: Advanced Organizational 

Behavior (Prerequisites: Junior Standing 
and SBAD 371) 



12 



Resources (Prerequisite: Junior Standing) 

SBAD 377: Advanced Organizational 3 

Behavior 

(Prerequisites: Junior Standing and SBAD 371) 

SBAD 477: Organization Theory 3 

(Prerequisite: SBAD 371) 

SSPH 448: Organizational Communication 3 

(Prerequisite: SSPH 201) 



Group C: Legal/Law Relations 



□ 



SCRJ 310: Policing in America 3 

(Prerequisite: SCRJ 101 or SSOC 101) 

SCRJ 330: Institutional Corrections 3 

(Prerequisite: SCRJ 101 or SSOC 101) 

SCRJ 333: Community-Based Corrections 3 

(Prerequisite: SCRJ 101 or SSOC 101) 

SCRJ 470: Criminal Justice Management 3 

and Organizations (Prerequisite: SCRJ 101 

or SSOC 101) 

SCRJ 472: Policing: Theories and Programs 3 

(Prerequisite: SCRJ 310) 

SSOC 43 1 : Social Inequality 3 

(Prerequisite: SSOC 101) 

SSOC 433: Race and Ethnic Relations 3 

(Prerequisite: SSOC 101) 

SBAD 347: Legal Environment of Business 3 

(Prerequisite: Junior Standing) 

SBAD 348: Issues in Commercial Law 3 

(Prerequisites: Junior Standing and SBAD 347) 



Total Hours Required 



19 



Group B. Workplace Relations 

Q SSOC 372: Community Organization 3 

(Prerequisite: SSOC 101) 

□ SSOC 471: Sociology of Organizations 3 
and Work (Prerequisite: SSOC 101 ) 

□ SSOC 44 1 : Sociology of Education 3 
(Prerequisite: SSOC 101) 

□ SPSY 311: Industrial and Organizational 3 
Psychology (Prerequisite: SPSY 101) 

□ SNPA 301 : Nonprofit Sector in the 3 
United States (Prerequisite: Sophomore 
Standing) 

□ SNPA 302: Introduction to Nonprofit 3 
Administration (Prerequisite: SNPA 301 or 
consent of instructor) 

□ SBAD 347: Legal Environment 3 
of Business (Prerequisite: Junior Standing) 

G SBAD 348: Issues in Commercial Law 3 

(Prerequisites: Junior Standing and SBAD 347) 

□ SBAD 371: Organizational Management 3 
& Behavior (Prerequisite: Junior Standing) 

□ SBAD 374: Management of Human 3 



'Up to 6 hours of General Education (less than 300 level) 
may be used to satisfy requirements of a minor 

■Minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 

^A minimum of 12 hours of upper division coursework is 
required. 

''Students may not use a course to fulfill a major and minor 
course requirement. 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



91 



Requirements 

SMUS 310: Jazz History 

SMUS 325: Jazz Theory 



SMUS 127(1) and/or 
SMUS 327: Jazz Band (1) 



Minor in Jazz Studies'" 
Student Worksheet 

SMUS 345. Jazz Improvisation 1 3 

SMUS 346: Jazz Improvisation II 3 

SMUS 398: Selected Topics in Music 3 



SMUS 130 and/or 330: 
Applied Music 



Total Hours Required 



21 



'Up to 6 hours of General Education (<300 level) may be used to 
satisj}' requirements of a minor 
-Minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 
^A minimum of 12 hours of upper division coursework is required. 



Minor in Commercial Music " 



Requirements 

SMUS 125: Music Theory 3 

SMUS 361: Music Business 3 

SMUS 364: Music Entrepreneurship 3 



Student Worksheet 

3 credits selected form the following: 



SB AD 350: Principles of Marketing 
SMUS 398: Selected Topics in Music 
SMUS 111/311: Applied Music (1-3) 
SMUS 325: Jazz Theory 



One class selected from the following: 

SMUS 140: History of Rock Music " 
SMUS 310: Jazz History 
SMUS 302: Music History II 

Any 100- or 300-level music 
performance group (3 semesters 
for one credit each) 



Total Hours Required 



18 



'Up to 6 hours of General Education (<300 level) may he used to 

satisfy' requirements of a minor 
-Minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 
^A minimum of 12 hours of upper division coursework is required. 
''Students taking SMUS 140 must take 300-level performance courses 

in order to meet the required 12 hours of upper-division coursework. 



92 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Languages^ Literature and Composition 

The Department of Languages, Literature and Composition in the College of Arts and Sciences offers the Bachelor of 
Arts degree with majors in English and Spanish and minors in Film Studies, French, German Studies, International Stud- 
ies, Spanish, and Spanish Translatioa'Interpreting. In general, assignments for courses numbered 300 or above are more 
rigorous and the grading standards more demanding than for courses numbered 299 or lower. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Major in English 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Courses 

I. Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



II. 



rv. 



SSPH201 



Mathemarics ( 

One math course: 

SMTH 120, 121, 122, 126, 127 

141, 142,231 
One course from math, logic or statistics^: 
SECO 291; SLGC 205, 207; SMTH 

102, 121, 122. 126, 127, 141, 142, 
202, 231; SPSY 225; SSOC 201 

III. Information Technology 

SCSC 138. 150; SIMS 101 



Natural Science 



7-8 



Two courses from the fi}llowing fat least 

one with the associated lab) 

SAST 111/L; SBIO 101/L, 102/L, 

1 1 0/L, 206, 240, 242/L, 270: SCHM 

101/L, 105, 106, 107, 109/L, 111/L, 
112/L; SGEG 201, 202; SGEL 101/L, 
102/L, 103/L, 120, 121, 123/L, 131; 
SPHS 101/L, 201/L, 202/L, 21 1/L, 
212/L 

Arts and Humanities 6 

One fine arts course: 3 

^ S A AS 204; S ATH 1 1 , 1 05, 1 06; 

SMUS 110, 140;STHE 161, 170 
One course from the following: (no more 3 

than 3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 

101, 105, 106; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 
283, 289, 290, 291; SFLM 240, 341, 342, 475, 
481; SMUS 110, 140; SPHL 102,211; 
SREL103;STHE 161, 170 



VI. Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

Placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course (Students placing 
into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in 
electives, if hours are required in the 
major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101, 105, or 106 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

Two courses from the following with two 

disciplines represented: 

SANT 102; SAAS 201; SECO 221, 

222; SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201, 301 
320; SPSY 101; SSOC 101; SWST 101 



24 



Major Requirements- 
Core Courses^ 
The following courses are required for 
all majors: 

English 300 3 

English 301 3 

Any Shakespeare course 300 or above 3 

Any cultural diversity & difference 3 

in literature course 300 or above 

Any linguistics course 300 or above 3 

Any writing course 300 or above 3 

English 459, 483 or Film 482^ 3 

English 490: Senior Seminar 3 

continued on next page 



'Statistics is recommended for majors who plan an Applied 
Writing Emphasis. 
■A minimum grade ofC is required. 
^English 459 is required for majors with a Writing 
Emphasis. Film 482 is required for majors who select 
the Film Emphasis. English 483 is required for all other 
English majors. 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



93 



All majors must choose one focus area: 

Literature Focus Area 

Any four courses from one of the 

following sequences: 

English 400, 409, 4 11, 4 12, 4 17, 

419,423,424, 

or 
English 425, 426, 427, 428, 430 



Creative Writing Focus Area 12 

Any four courses from the following: 

English 308, 368, 370, 397, 468 



Applied Writing Focus Area 1 2 

Any four courses from the following: 

English318, 345, 346, 352, 371, 

373, 397 



Film Focus Area 1 2 

Any four courses from the following: 

Film341,342, 360,475, 480. 

481,491 



General Focus Area 12 

Any four 300 or 400 level English 

or film courses 



Cognate or Minor^ 12-18 

(in consultation with advisor) 



Supporting Courses^ 15 

English 279 & English 280 or 6 

English 289 & English 290 

History 102 3 

Foreign language 201 and 202 6 

or above (except 204) 



Electives 4-14 



'Statistics is recommended for majors with an Applied Writing 



Total Hours Required 120 FocusArea. 

-A minimum grade oj C is requiivd. 



^English 459 is required for majors with a Writing Emphasis. 
Film 482 is required for majors with a Film Emphasis. English 
483 is required for all other English majors. 



94 College of Arts and Sciences 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Minor in English 
Student Worksheet 



Courses Required for the Minor'--'^''*'^ 
Two of the following: 

English 208, 245. 250, 252, 275, 279, 2^ 

283,289,290,291,300 



A minimum of 1 2 hours from any 1 2 

combination of the following 300 or 400-level 
English courses: 

Writing 

English 308, 318, 345, 346, 352, 368, 370, 

371,373,397,468 



'Up to 6 hours of General Education (<300 level) may be 

used 10 salisfi' requirements of a minor 
-Minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 
^A minimum of 12 hours of upper division coursework is 

required. 
''With approval, students may apply relevant SEGL special 
topics courses, one-lime only courses, internships, and indepen 
dent studies to the minor 
^A course taken in the minor cannot also be counted toward 

the major 



Literature 

American: English 383, 391. 425, 426, 427, 

428, 429, 430, 447 

British: English 400, 401, 405, 406, 408, 409, 

411,412,417,419,423,424 

Literature and Cultur e 

SEGL 307, 322, 422, 436, 437, 484, 485 



Language/Linguistics 
English 451, 453, 455, 459 

Film 

Film 341, 342, 360, 475, 480, 481, 482, 491 



Total Hours Required 



18 



Minor in International Studies '■- 
Student Worksheet 



General requirement 3 

Select one from: 
SGIS 310: International Politics 
SGIS 320: Comparative Politics 
SGIS 330: International Organizations 

Language requirement ^ 6 

Two courses (201 and 202) of either French, 
German or Spanish 

Other required courses 

At least one course in each of the 
following areas: 

History 3 



SGIS 380: Environmental Policy 

SGIS 420: Women and Politics: 

A Global Perspective 

SGIS 460: International Law 

SSOC 375: Population Dynamics 

SSOC 474: Social Change 

or any other appropriate course approved by 

advisor and the director of Interdisciplinary 

Studies 

Experiential Learning 



Opportunity 

Independent Study, Internship, Study Abroad 
or some other opportunity approved by advisor 
and the director of Interdisciplinary Studies 



Any 300- or 400-level history course examin- 
ing an international topic or country other than 

the United States 

Culture & Cultural 3 



Total Hours Required 



18-2P 



Understanding 

SSPN 204: Latin American Culture 

SFRN 204: French Culture 

SGRM 204: German Culture 

or any other appropriate course approved by 

advisor and the director of Interdisciplinary 

Studies 

Global Issues 

SCRJ 471: Comparative Criminal Justice 

Systems 

SGIS 326: Middle East Politics 

SGIS 327: East Asian Politics 



'Up to 6 hours of General Education (<300 level) may be 

used to satisfy requirements of a minor. 
'Minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 
^This minor requires language proficiency at the 202 level 
or above. No language courses below the 201 level count 
toward the minor Students may take courses through the 
202 level or attempt a placement test in any foreign 
language. Students who test at the 201 level must take 202. 
Students who have already completed 202 or test at the 
202 level have two options: take an additional language 
course (including culture course taught in a foreign 
langt4age, conversation course, translation course, etc.) or 
lake an additional course from the accepted courses for the 
minor 
''Students exempt from the language requirement will need 

18 hours. Otherwise the requirement will be 21 hours. 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



95 



Minor in Film Studies^'^'^'*'^ 
Student Worksheet 



Required Courses 

SFLM 240: Introduction to Film 

SFLM 425: Film History to 1967 or 

SFLM 435: Film History after 1967 



Four courses from the following: 



12 



Q 



SFLM 326: Motion Picture and 
Video Techniques* 
SFLM 341: Literature and Film 
SFLM 342: Film Genre (may be 
repeated for credit if topic changes) 
SFLM 360: Film Directors (may be 
repeated for credit if topic changes) 
SFLM 398: Special Topics in Film 
(may be repeated for credit if topic 
changes) 

SFLM 425: Film History to 1967 (if 
not taken as a requirement) 
SFLM 475: International Film 
SFLM 480: Interdisciplinary 
Approaches to film (may be repeated 
for credit if topic changes) 
SFLM 481: Cultural Diversity and 
Difference in Film (may be repeated 
for credit if topic changes) 
SFLM 482: Film Theory & Criticism 



Total Hours Required 



18 



'Up 10 6 hours of General Education (<iOO level) may be 

used to satisfy requirements of a minor 
^Minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 
^A minimum of 12 hours of upper-division coursework is 

required. 
''With approval of advisor, students may apply relevant 

courses to the minor if the topic relates to film; special topic 

courses: one-time only courses, internships: and 

independent studies. 
^A course taken in the minor cannot also be counted toward 

the major 
^Be sure to check prerequisite for this course. 



Minor in French^ 
Student Worksheet 



The minor in French will require 1 8 hours with 12 hours of upper division courses: 3 credit hours from one of the 
following courses: SFRN 202, SFRN 204, SFRN 210 (Can be exempted by placement test or consent of the instructor); 
15-18 credit hours from the 300 level French courses or above. 



One of the following (May be exempted by 
placement test or consent of instructor): 



French 202 
French 204 
French 2 1 



Intermediate French 3 
French Culture 3 

French 3 



Oral Communication 

Five (or six if 200-level exempted) 
of the following: 

French 308: Business French 3 

French 309: French Grammar 3 

and Composition 

French 3 10: French Conversation 3 

French 320: French Civilization 3 

French 330: Survey of 3 

French Literature I 



French 331: Survey of 

French Literature II 

French 250 or 350: Selected French 

Studies Abroad 

French 398: Topics in 

French Language or Literature 

French 399: Independent Study 

or Internship 

French 402: Masterpieces 

of French Drama 

French 403: Masterpieces of the 

French Novel 



Total Hours Required 



18 



'a minimum grade ofC is required. 



96 



College of Arts and Sciences 
20082009 use Upstate Catalog 



Minor in German Studies* 
Student Worksheet 

The minor in German Studies will require a minimum of 18 hours with 12 hours of upper division courses: 6 credit hours 
from SGRM 202 and SGRM 210; 12 credit hours from SGRM 204 or 300 level German courses. 



Required Courses 6 

German 202: Intermediate German 

German 210: German Oral 

Communication 

Four of the following 12 

German 204: German Culture 3 

German 250 or 350: Selected 3 

German Studies Abroad 

German 308: Business German 3 

German 310: 3 

German Conversation 



German 325: Modem German 

Literature in Translation 

German 398: 

Topics in German Literature/ 

Language 

German 399: Independent Study 

or Internship 



Total Hours Required 



18 



'a minimum grade ofC is required. 



Minor in African American Studies*'^'^''*'^'^ 
Student Worksheet 



Minor Requirements 

SAAS 201 



Introduction to 3 

African American Studies 
SAAS 204: African American 3 
Culture 

One of the following: 3 

SEGL 391: African American 
Literature or 

SEGL 429: Harlem Renaissance 
One of the following: 3 

SHST 3 1 0: African American 
History to 1865 or SHST 311: 
African American History Since 1860 



'Up to 6 hours of General Education (<300 level) may be used 
to satisfy requirements of a minor 
'Minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 
^A minimum of 12 hours of upper division coursework is required. 
^English 102 must be completed before taking courses in the 
minor 

^There are additional pre-requisites for courses in Criminal Jus- 
tice, Sociology, and Government which may be met with general 
education or elective credit. 

^Topics courses numbered 398 may be used when the subject mat- 
ter pertains to African American Studies. 



Two of the courses selected from the following 

disciplines: 

SAAS 398: Topics in African 3 

American Studies 

SATH210: African Art 3 

SATH304: Southern Folk Art 3 

SCRJ380: Minorities, Crime and 3 

Criminal Justice 
SCRJ451/SGIS 451: Civil Rights 3 

and Civil Liberties 
SHST 495: Topics in African 3 

American History 

SJOU 480: Minorities in the Media 3 

SMUS 310: Jazz History 3 

SSOC433: Race and Ethnic 3 

Relations 



Total Hours Required 



18 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



97 



Bachelor of Arts 
Major in Spanish 
Student Worksheet 



General Education Courses 

I. Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



III. 



IV. 



SSPH201 

Mathematics 6-8 

One math course: 

SMTH 120, 121, 122, 126, 127 

141, 142,231 

One course from math, logic or statistics: 

SECO 29 1 ; SLGC 205, 207; SMTH 

102, 120, 121, 122, 126, 127, 141, 
202, 231; SPSY225; SSOC 201 

Information Technology 3 

SCSC 138, 150; SIMS 101 



Natural Science 7-8 

Two courses from the fijllowing (at least 

one with the associated lab) 

SAST 1 1 1/L; SBIO 101/L, 102/L, 

1 1 0/L, 206, 240, 242/L, 270; SCHM 

101/L, 105, 106, 107, 109/L, 11 1/L, 
112/L;SGEG201,202;SGEL 101/L, 
102/L, 103/L, 120, 121, 123/L, 131; 
SPHS 101/L, 20 1/L, 202/L, 21 1/L, 
212/L 

V. Arts and Humanities 6 

One fine arts course: 

SAAS 204; SATH 101, 105, 106; 

SMUS 110, 140;STHE 161, 170 
One course from the following: (no more 
than 3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 

101, 105, 106; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 283, 289, 
290, 291; SFLM 240, 341, 342. 475, 481; SMUS 110, 
140; SPHL 102, 211; SREL 103; STHE 161, 170 

VI. Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 
SSPN 102 



VII. History 



SHST 101 or 102 



VHI. 



Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

Two courses from thefe>llowing with two 

disciplines represented: 

SANT 102; SAAS 201; SECO 221, 
222;SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201, 301 
320;SPSY 101; SSOC 101;SWST101 



Major Requirements 



Core Courses 21 

(The following courses are required for all majors) 

SSPN 301 

SSPN 309 

SSPN 310 

SSPN 330 or 331 

SSPN 332 or 333 

SSPN 453 or 454 

SSPN 490 (Senior Seminar) 



Any five courses from the 15 

following (with at least one from each 
area of emphasis) 



Language 

□ SSPN331,312, 315, 350,453,454 

Culture 

□ SSPN 320, 32 1,350, 398 (culture topic) 

Literature 

□ SSPN 330, 331, 332, 333, 398 (literature 
topic), 420, 431 



Cognate or Minor 12-18 

(in consultation with advisor) 



Supporting Courses 

Three semesters of a second 
foreign language 



Electives 



8-20 



Total Hours Required 



120 



'a minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 



98 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Minor in Spanish*'^^ 
Student Worksheet 



The minor in Spanish will require 18 hours with 15 hours of upper division courses: 3 credit hours from SSPN 202 
(may be exempted by placement test or consent of the instructor); 15 credit hours from upper division courses. 



Required Course (May be exempted by placement 
test or consent of instructor): 

Spanish 202: Intermediate Spanish 3 



Any five 300 or 400 level courses 

(except Spanish 451) 



'a minimum grade ofC is required. 

•Up to 6 hours of General Education (<300 level) may be 
used to satisfy requirements of a minor 
^With approval, students may apply relevant Spanish special 
topics courses, one-time-only courses, internships, and inde 
pendent studies to the minor. 



Total Hours Required 



18 



Minor in Spanish Translation/Interpreting^'^'-'''* 
Student Worksheet 



Required Courses 9 

SEGL 245: Professional Writing 3 

or SEGL 252: Understanding 

English Grammar 
SSPN 311: Introduction to Non 3 

Literary Translation 
SSPN 312: Introduction to 3 

Interpreting 

One of the following: 3 

SEGL 3 18: Writing & Computers 3 

SEGL 345: Advanced Professional 3 

Writing 

SEGL 346: Technical Writing 3 

SEGL 352: Text Editing 3 

SEGL 371: Grant Writing 3 

Any 400-level English Course 3 

or Internship 
SEGL 245: Professional Writing 3 

or SEGL 252: Understanding 

English Grammar (if taking both) 



Two of the following: 

Any two upper division Spanish courses 

300-level or higher 



Total Hours Required 



18 



'Up to 6 hours of General Education (<300 level) may be 

used to satisfy' requirements of a minor 
'Minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 
^A minimum of 12 hours of upper-division coursework is 

required. 
''SSPN 311, 312. and other upper division Spanish courses 

require SSPN 202 as a prerequisite. 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



99 



Department of Informatics 



The Bachelor of Arts in Information Management and Systems is a muitidisciphnary degree integrating an understanding of computer 
technology, information processing technology, communications, discipline-specific knowledge, information resources administration, 
and the ability to recognize relationships between technical systems and social structures. The program prepares graduates to design, 
implement, analyze, and manage information resources and use information technology to solve problems in healthcare, industry, 
government, and educational settings. The curriculum for the B.A. in Information Mangagement and Systems includes includes 43-44 
hours in general education, 42 hours in the information technology core and informatics, 1 2 hours in digital media, and 1 8 hours in a 
concentration area. The application areas provide instruction in the application of technology in one of four fields: healthcare, media and 
communication, education, and business. 

Students who have received an associate degree from an accredited healthcare information management program and hold the 
registered health information technician (RHIT) certification may enroll in the accredited healthcare informatics application area (ac- 
creditation by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education [CAHIIM] is pending). 
Students completing the accredited program of study must, in addition to all other requirements for the healthcare informatics application 
area, perform a practicum in a healthcare setting (SHIM 498), take an approved statistics course, and take a course, and take a course 
in department management (SHIM 250). Upon completion, students are eligible to take the registered health information administrator 
(RHIA) certification exam. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Major in Information Management and Systems 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Courses 

I. Communication 9 

SEGL 101 and SEGL 102 

SSPH201 

II. Mathematics 6 

One math course: 

SMTH 121, 122, 126, 127, 141, 142, 

One statistics course: 

SECO 291; SMTH 102; SPSY 225; 

SSOC 201 

III. Information Teclinology 3 

SCSC 138, 150; SIMS 101 

IV. Natural Science 7-8 

Two courses from the following (at least 
one with the associated lab) 

SAST 1 1 1/L; SBIO 101/L, 102/L, 

1 1 0/L, 206, 240, 242/L, 270; SCHM 

101/L, 105, 106, 107, 109/L, 11 1/L, 
112/L; SGEG 201, 202; SGEL 101/L, 
102/L, 103/L, 120, 121, 123/L, 131; 
SPHS 101/L, 201/L,202/L, 21 1/L, 
212/L 
V. Arts and Humanities 6 

One fine arts course: 

S A AS 204; S ATH 1 1 , 1 05, 1 06; 

SMUS 110, 140;STHE 161, 170 
One course fi-om the following: (no more 
than 3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 

101, 105, 106; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 283, 289, 
290, 291; SFLM 240, 341, 342, 475, 481; SMUS 110, 
140;SPHL102, 211;SREL 103; STHE 161, 170 



VI. Foreign Language and Culture 6 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

Placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course** (Students placing 
into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in 
electives, if hours are required in the 
major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101, 102, 105, or 106 



VIII. 



Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

Two courses fi-om the following with two 

disciplines represented: 

S ANT 1 02; SAAS 20 1 ; SECO 22 1 , 

222; SGEG 101. 103; SGIS 201, 30! 

320; SPSY 101; SSOC 101; SWST 101 



Major Requirements' 



39 



Information Technology Core 

Foundation 

SIMS 201 : Concepts of 3 

Information Management & Systems 
SCSC 139; Visual BASIC 3 

Programming 1 
SIMS 211: Microcomputer 3 

Organization 
SIMS 303: Organizational 3 

Informatics 

SIMS 305: Social Informatics 3 



Networking Technology 

SCSC 315: Networking Technology 3 

SIMS 4 1 5 : E-Commerce and the 3 

Internet 

Continued on next page 



100 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Database Technology 

SCSC 325: Fundamentals of 3 

Relational Databases 
SIMS 42 1 : Data Warehousing 3 

and Decision Support Systems 

Technology 
IT Management 

SIMS 441: IT Project Management 3 

SIMS 450: Executive IT Managment 3 



Capstone 



SIMS 499: Senior Seminar 



Technical Electives ' (choose two) 6 

SIMS 498: Experiential Learning 3 

SIMS 422: Knowledge-Based 3 

Systems 
SIMS 423: Human/Machine 3 

Interaction 
SIMS 440: Workflow & Business 3 

Process Re-Engineering 
SHIM 417: Healthcare Information 3 

Security 
SHIM 498: Practicum in Healthcare 3 

Information Management 

Digital Media and Communication 12 

SEGL 245: Professional Writing 3 

SIMS 345: Technical Presentation 3 

SIMS 346: Communication and 3 

New Technology 
SIMS 347: Web Page Construction 3 



Application Areas ^ 

(Student ciiooses one focus area) 



18 



Business Informatics 

SB AD 225: Financial Accounting 3 

SBAD 226: Managerial Accounting 3 

SBAD 371: Organizational 3 

Management and Behavior 
SBAD 390: Business Information 3 

Systems 
SIMS 440: Workflow & Business 3 

Process Re-Engineering 
Choose one upper level business 3 

or economics course 

Healthcare Informatics 18 

" SHIM 201: Understanding 3 

Healthcare Organizations 
SHIM 301: Healthcare Information 3 

Systems 
SHIM 302: Information Trends 3 

in Healthcare Systems 
SHIM 413: Network Applications 3 

for Healthcare 
Choose two courses from the following: 
SHIM 412: Ethics and Risk 3 

Management in Healthcare Info Syst. 



SHIM 417: Healthcare Information 3 

Security 
SHIM 450: Healthcare Database 3 

Systems and Information Retrieval 
SIMS 422: Knowledge-Based 3 

Systems 

Education Informatics 18 

SEDF 210: Foundations in 3 

Education 
SEDF 333: Educational 3 

Development of the Lifelong Learner 
SEDF 341: Educational 3 

Procedures for Exceptional Children 
SEDT 420: Information Systems 3 

in Education 
SEDT 430: Instructional Design 3 

and Methods for Information Systems 

Training 
SEDT 497: Information Systems 3 

Education Internship 

Media Informatics 18 

SSPH 301 : Theories and Principles 3 

of Human Communication 
SJOU 201: Survey of Mass 3 

Communication 
Choose four courses fi"om the following: 12 
SSPH 303: Ethics in 3 

Communication 
SSPH 310: Interpersonal 3 

Communication 

SSPH 315: Conflict Resolution 3 

SSPH 333: Advanced Public 3 

Speaking 
SSPH 448: Organizational 3 

Communication 
SSPH 450: Communication for 3 

Social Change 
SJOU 303: Law and Ethics of 3 

the Mass Media 
SJOU 3 1 0: Mass Media and 3 

Society 
SJOU 326: Motion Picture and 3 

Video Techniques 
SJOU 328: Public Relations and 3 

Persuasion 
SEGL 318: Writing and Computers 3 

of the Mass Media 
SEGL 345: Advanced Professional 3 

Writing 
SEGL 346: Technical Writing 3 

Supporting Course 3 

Cultural Studies selected with 3 

approval of advisor 



Electives 



SHIM 250: Department Admin, 
in Healthcare 



2-3 

~3 



Total Hours Required 



120-122 



'Students in accredited healthcare informatics must take SPSY 225. SHIM 498 and SHIM 250. 
-A minimum grade ofC is required. 

College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



101 



Mathematics and Computer Science 

The Division of Mathematics and Computer Science in the College of Arts and Sciences offers the Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree in mathematics and the Bachelor of Arts in computer information systems and Bachelor of Science degree in 
computer science (ABET accredited). Minors are offered in mathematics and computer science. 

Bachelor of Science 

Major in Mathematics 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Courses 
Communication 

SEGL 101 and SEGL 102 

SSPH 201 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

Two courses from the following with two 

disciplines represented: 

SAAS201;SANT102;SECO221, 

222;SGEG 101, 103; SGIS201, 301 
320; SPSY 101; SSOC 101; SWST 101 



Mathematics 



SMTH 141 Calculus I 
SMTH 142 Calculus II 



III. Information Technology 
SCSC 150 

IV. Natural Science 



SBIO lOI/L, 102/L;orSCHM 
112/L;orSPHS2Il/L, 212/L 



11/L, 



V. Arts and Humanities 6 

One fine arts course: 

SAAS 204; SATH 101, 105, 106; 

SMUS 110;STHE 161, 170 
One course fi-om the fallowing: (no more 
than 3 credit hours fi-om a specific discipline) 

SAAS204;SAMS101,102;SATH101, 

105, 106; SEGL 250, 252. 275, 279, 280, 283, 289, 290, 
291; SFLM 240, 341, 342, 475, 481; SMUS 110; SPHL 
102, 211;SREL103;STHE 161, 170 

VI. Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

Placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course** (Students placing 
into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in 
electives, if hours are required in the 
major). 



VII. History 



Major Requirements' 

' SMTH 340: Mathematical 3 

Structure and Proof 
SMTH 344: Matrix Algebra 3 

SMTH 346: Introduction to 3 

Modem Algebra 

SMTH 354: Real Analysis I 3 

SSTA410: Introduction to 3 

Probability Theory 

SMTH 599 or SCSC 599^ 3 



Choose one of the following 3 areas of focus: 
Pure, Computation or Industrial Mathematics 



Pure Mathematics: 



Two of : 



SMTH 544 
SMTH 546 
SMTH 554 

SMTH 

SMTH 



Linear Algebra 
Algebraic Stuctures 
Real Analysis II 



Three additional 400 level or higher mathemat 
ics/statistics courses: 

SMTH/SSTA 3 

SMTH/SSTA 3 

SMTH/SSTA 3 

Computation Mathematics: 

Five approved SMTH, SSTA, or SCSC courses 
for majors. One 300-level or higher, and four 
400- level or higher. 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 



SHST 101, 102, 105, or 106 



Continued on next page 



102 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Industrial Mathematics: 

SMTH 345: Applied Partial 

Differential Equations 
SSTA413: Introduction to 

Stochastic Processes 
SMTH 444: Elements of 

Optimization 

SMTH 561: Numerical Analysis II 

SMTH 579: Introduction to 

Industrial Mathematics 



Cognate'or Minor^ 12-21 



Pure Emphasis: Cognate courses totaling 1 2 hours require 
approval by major advisor. Minors may require 18-21 hours, 
of which 6 hours may be applied toward general education 
requirements. 

Computation or Industrial Mathematics Emphasis* 



SCSC 300: Computer Science II 3 

SCSC 32 1 : Computer Science 111 3 

SCSC 421: Design & Analysis 3 
of Algorithms 

300-Ievel or higher SCSC course 3 
for majors.' 



Supporting Courses' 



SMTH 241: Calculus III 
SMTH 245: Elementary 
Differential Equations 
SCSC 200: Computer Science I 
SCSC 560: Numerical 
Analysis I 



13 

4 
3 

3 
3 



Electives^ 



7-16 



Total Hours Required 



120 



'a minimum grade ofC is required in each course indicated. 
^Students in Pure Mathematics focus must take SMTH 599. 
'Excluding SCSC 315. 325 and 441. 
^A minor in Computer Science is completed by two additional 300 

level Computer Science courses in the cognate or as an elective. 
- Recommended electives for the Computation Emphasis 

include Mathematics 3 74. English 245. and English 346. 



Minor in Mathematics* 
Student Worksheet 

The mathematics minor may be utilized by students in any major. 



Mathematics 8 
(General Education Requirement) 

Mathematics 141 4 

Mathematics 142 4 



Minor Requirements 

four courses numbered 241 or above 12-13 



Total Hours Required 



20-21 



'a minimum grade ofC is required. 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



103 



Bachelor of Arts 

Major in Computer Information Systems 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Courses 

Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



SSPH201 



II. Mathematics' 

SMTH 102 

SMTH 126 



III. Information Technology' 3 

SCSC 150 

IV. Natural Science 7-8 

Two courses fi-om the following (at least 

one with the associated lab) 

SAST 1 1 1 /L; SBIO 1 1 /L, 1 02/L, 

1 1 0/L, 206, 240, 242/L, 270; SCHM 

101/L, 105, 106, 107. 109/L, lU/L, 
112/L;SGEG201;SGEL 101/L, 
102/L, 103/L, 120, 121, 123/L, 131; 
SPHS 101/L, 201/L,202/L, 21 1/L, 
212/L 

V. Arts and Humanities 6 

One fine arts course: 

SAAS 204; SATH 101, 105, 106; 

SMUS 110;STHE 161, 170 
One course fi-om the following: (no more 
than 3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101. 102; SATH 

101, 105, 106; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 
283, 289, 290, 29 1 ; SFLM 240, 34 1 , 342, 475, 
481; SMUS 110; SPHL 102, 211; SREL 103; 
STHE 161, 170 

VI. Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

Placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course** (Students placing 
into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in 
electives, if hours are required in the 
major). 



VII. History 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

Two courses from the following with two 

disciplines represented: 

SAAS201;SANT102;SECO221, 

222; SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201, 301 
320; SPSY 101; SSOC 101; SWST 101 



Core Major Requirements' 42 

' SCSC 200; Computer Science I 3 

SCSC 234: Visual BASIC 

Programming or SCSC 238: C++ 

Programming 3 

SCSC 300: Computer Science II 3 

SCSC 311: Information Systems 3 

Hardware and Software 

SCSC 412: Computer Networks I 3 

SCSC 455: Computer Security 3 

SCSC 520: Database System 3 

Design 
SC SC 5 2 1 : Database Implementation, 3 

Application & Administration 
SBAD 371: Organizational Mgmt. 3 

and Behavior 

SBAD 390: Business info Systems 3 

SEGL 245/252/346 3 

or SJOU 301/304/335 

SMTH 174: Discrete Mathematics 3 

SMTH 202: Elemtry. Statistics II 3 

or SMTH 315: Statistical Methods I 

or SMTH 127: Pre-Calculus II 

SCSC 599: Senior Seminar 3 



SHST 101, 102, 105, or 106 



One of the following ^reas of Focus: 

Networking and Information Security' 24 

' SCSC 512: Networking II 3 

SCSC 555: Advanced Computer 3 

Security & Information Assurance 
Two courses to be selected from the following: 6 
SCSC 355: Digital Forensics; or 
SCSC 356: Cryptography; or 
SCSC 515: Wireless Networking 
SCSC 516: Distributed and Network 

Programming; or 
Any SCSC 300 level or above course 
for majors-: 



104 



'a minimum grade ofC is required. 
-Excluding SCSC 315. 325 and 441. 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Twelve hours from the following: 12 

SBAD 347: Legal Environment of Business: or 
SCRJ 101 : Intro to Criminal Justice; or 
SCRJ 461^: Criminal Procedure; or 
SCRJ 300^: Criminal Trial Practice; or 
SCRJ 342^: Crime in America; or 
SCRJ 321^: Criminal Law; or 
Required courses for Computer Technology 

programs at technical/community colleges; or 
Advisor approved courses selected from 

Computer Science 



SCSC 450: E-Business Web 3 

Application Development 

Any upper level SCSC course for majors^3 

SBAD 225: Financial Accounting 3 

SBAD 226 or any upper level 3 

Business or Economics course 
Two additional 300 level or above SBAD courses 6 



Electives 



10-11 



System Analysis* 24 

SCSC 32 1 : Computer Science III 3 

SCSC 440: Object Oriented Systems 3 

Analysis and Design 



Total Hours Required 



120 



'a minimum grade ofC is required in each course indicated. 
^Excluding SCSC 315. 325 and 441. 
^SCRJ 101 is required as a prerequisite. 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



105 



II. 



III. 



IV. 



V. 



VI. 



Bachelor of Science 

Major in Computer Science 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Courses 

Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



SSPH 201 



Mathematics' 6 

SMTH 126 

SMTH 127 

Information Technology' 3 

SCSC 150 

Natural Science 8 

SBIO 101/L, 102/L; or SCHM 1 1 1/L, 

112/L;orSPHS211/L, 212/L 
Arts and Humanities 6 

One fine arts course: 

SAAS 204; SATH 101, 105, 106; 

SMUS 110;STHE 161, 170 
One course from the following: (no more 
than 3 credit hours fi'om a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 

101, 105, 106; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 
283, 289, 290, 291; SFLM 240, 341, 342,475, 
481; SMUS 110;SPHL 102, 211; SREL 103; 
STHE 161, 170 

Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

Placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course (Students placing 
into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in 
electives, if hours are required in the 
major). 



VII. History 



SHSTlOl, 102, 105, or 106 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

Two courses from the following with two 

disciplines represented: 

SAAS 201; SANT 102; SECO 221, 

222;SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201, 301 
320; SPSY 101; SSOC 101; SWST 101 



'a minimum grade ofC is required in each course indicated. 
^Excluding SCSC 315. 325 and 441. 



Core Major Requirements* 

' SCSC 200: Computer Science 1 

SCSC 2 1 0: Computer 

Organization 

SCSC 234: Visual BASIC 

Programming or SCSC 238: 
C++ Programming 

SCSC 300: Computer Science II 

SCSC 310: Introduction to 

Computer Architecture 

SCSC 32 1 : Computer Science III 

SCSC 511; Operating Systems 

SCSC 530: Programming 

Language Structures 

SCSC 540: Software Engineering 

SCSC 599: Senior Seminar 



30 

3 



One of the following three areas of focus' 
Scientific Computing: 

Three courses from the following: 

SCSC 314: Introduction to Robotics 

SCSC 370: Fundamentals of 

Bioinformatics 
SCSC 421: Design and Analysis of 

Algorithms 
SCSC 525: Knowledge Discovery 

& Data Mining 
SCSC 580: Introduction to Artificial 

Intelligence 
SCSC 585: Introduction to Computer 

Vision 

SCSC 399: Independent Study or 
SCSC 499: Directed Research 

Any SCSC course 300-level or above for majors^ 



Enterprise Solutions: 

Three courses from the following: 

SCSC 412: Computer Networks 1 

SCSC 440: Object Oriented Systems 

Analysis and Design 
SCSC 450: E-Business Web 

Application Development 

SCSC 455: Computer Security 

SCSC 520: Database System Design 

SCSC 525: Knowledge Discovery 

& Data Mining 
Any SCSC course 300-level or above for majors^ 



General: 

Any four SCSC 300-level or above for majors 



Continued on next page 



106 



CoWege of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Cognate ' 12 

SMTH 315: Statistical Methods I 3 



Nine additional hours (with advisor approval) 9 

3 

3 

3 

Supporting Courses' 15 

" SMTH 174: Elements of Discrete 3 

Math 

SMTH 141: Calculus I 4 

SMTH 142: Calculus II 4 

SBIO 101 or SCHM 1 1 1 or 4 

SPHS211 

Electives 4-7 



'a minimum grade ofC is required. 

Total Hours Required 120 ^Exdudwgscsc 3ii.3i5.m.44i. 



Minor in Computer Science^ 
Student Worksheet 

Mathematics ^*'"«'' Requirements 



Computer Science 300 3 

,. , »4 .. ,-,£ Computer Science 321 3 

or higher or Ma h 126 ^^^^ 234 or SCSC 238 3 



Mathematics 1 2 1 with a B 
or higher, or Matl 
Mathematics 174 



Computer Studies 

Computer Science 200 



Computer Science courses 300-level or 
above 



' A minimum grade of C is required. Total Hours Required 27 



College of f^rts and Sciences 107 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Natural Sciences and Engineering 

The Division of Natural Sciences and Engineering, in the College of Arts and Sciences, offers the Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree in biology and chemistry and engineering technology management. Minors are also offered in biology and 
chemistry'. Courses are otTered in the areas of engineering, geology, physical science, physics and astronomy. Students 
interested in the following professional programs typically pursue coursework under this division: chiropractic, dental, 
engineering, medical, optometry, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physician assisting, physical therapy, speech pathology, 
and veterinary medicine. 

In general, assignments for courses numbered 300 or above are more rigorous and the grading standards more demand- 
ing than for courses numbered 299 or lower. 

Bachelor of Science 

Major in Biology 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Courses 

I. Communication 

SEGL 1 1 and SEGL 1 02 

HZZ SSPH 201 

II. Mathematics* 



SMTH 126 
SMTH 127 



III. Information Technology 

SCSC 138, 150; SIMS 101 

IV. Natural Science 



SCHM 111/L 
SCHM 112/L 



Arts and Humanities t 

One fine arts course: 

^ SAAS 204; SATH 101, 105, 106; 

SMUS 110, 140;STHE 161, 170 
One course from the following: (no more 
than 3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 

101, 105, 106; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 
283, 289, 290, 291 ; SFLM 240, 341, 342, 475, 
481; SMUS 110, 140; SPHL 102,211; 
SREL I03;STHE 161, 170 



VI. Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

Placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course (Students placing 
into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in 
electives, if hours are required in the 
major). 



VII. History 



SHSTlOl, 102, 105, or 106 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

Two courses from the following with rwo 

disciplines represented: 

SANT102;SAAS201;SECO221, 

222; SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201, 301 
320; SPSY 101; SSOC 101; SWST 101 



'The successful completion of Mathematics 141 with a 
minimum grade ofC fulfills Group 11 requirements. The 
additional three hours are made up as electives. 



Continued on next page 



108 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Major Requirements^'-'''* 

" Biology 101, 102 



Biology 201, 202 



Biology 350 4 

One Field Course selected from; 4 

SBIO 305, 380, 525, 570 
Biology (four courses at the 15-16 

200/500 level excluding Biology 206, 240, 
270, 270L, 399). At least three of the four 
courses must have an associated lab. 



Biology 599: Senior Seminar 



Biology majors may select a cognate (1 2 hours) 
OR a minor (18-24 hours) 



Cognate^'^ 0orl2 
(with approval of advisor) 

Physics 201 +202 recommended 8 

Other 4 



OR 

Minor^'^'^ Oorl8 

(with approval of advisor) 



Supporting Courses 14 

~ Chemistry 33 1 + 33 1 L 4 

Chemistry 332 + 332L 4 

Statistics (Mathematics 102 or 3 

Psychology 225) 



Electives 



0-11 



Total Hours Required 



120-122 



■A minimum grade ofC is required. 

^To receive a biology degree, students must complete at 

least 15 hours of major course credit at USC Upstate. 
^A minimum of two 500 level courses (excluding 599) must 

be completed. A maximum of 4 hours from SBIO 541. 
54 IL, or 542 may be counted as major credit. A total of 11 
courses in the major are required. 



^A cognate is required for all students not fulfilling 
requirements for a minor that has been approved by their 
advisor 

^ Up to 6 hours (8 hours if lab courses) of General 
Education (<300 level) may be used to satisfy 
requirements of a minor 



Minor in Biology 
Student Worksheet 



Required Courses''^'-' 

SBIO WlOl + SBIO WIOIL 4 

SBIO W102 + SBIO W102L 4 

300-level Biology + lab 4 

500-level Biology + lab 4 

300-level or above Biology + lab 4 



Total hours required 20 



'Up to 6 hours (8 hours if lab courses) of General 
Education (<300 level) may be used to satisfy 
requirements of a minor 

^A minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 

^A minimum of 12 hours of upper division coursework 
is required. 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



109 



Bachelor of Science 

Major in Chemistry 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Courses 

I. Communication 9 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



II. 



SSPH 201 



Mathematics' 

SMTH 141 andSMTH 142 



III. Information Technology 3 

SCSC 138, 150; SIMS 101 

IV. Natural Science 8 

SCHM Ill/Land SCHM 11 2/L 

V. Arts and Humanities 6 

One fine arts course: 

SAAS 204; SATH 101, 105, 106; 

SMUS 110, 140;STHE 161, 170 
One course fi'om the following: (no more 
than 3 credit hours fivm a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 

101, 105, 106;SEGL250,252, 275, 279. 280, 
283, 289, 290, 291 ; SFLM 240, 341, 342, 475, 
481; SMUS 110, 140; SPHL 102, 211; 
SREL 103;STHE 161, 170 

VI. Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

Placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course (Students placing 
into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in 
electives, if hours are required in the 
major). 



Major Requirements^'^ 

Chemistry 331,332: 6 

Organic Chemistry 

Chemistry 33 1L,332L: 2 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

Chemistry 321: 3 

Quantitative Analysis 
Chemistry 32 IL: 1 

Quantitative Analysis Laboratory 

Chemistry 397: Junior Seminar 1 

Chemistry 5 1 1 : Inorganic 3 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 541, 542: 6 

Physical Chemistry 

Chemistry 54 1L,542L: 2 

Physical Chemistry Laboratory 

Chemistry 599: Senior Seminar 3 

Seven hours selected from 7 

the following: 

□ Chemistry 522: Instrumental 
Analysis 

G Chemistry 530: Spectrometric 

Identification of Organic Compounds 

□ Chemistry 581 or 582: 
Biochemistry 

G Chemistry 583L: Biochemistry 

Laboratory 
G Chemistry 534: Polymer Chemistry 



Supporting Courses 

Mathematics 241 

Mathematics 315 

Physics 20 1 and 202 

or Physics 2 1 1 and 2 1 2 



VII. History 



SHST 101, 102, 105, or 106 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Two courses from the following with two 

disciplines represented: 

SANT102;SAAS201;SECO221, 

222; SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201, 301 

320;SPSY101;SSOC101; 

SWSTlOl 

'/4 minimum grade ofC is required. 
^To receive a chemistry degree, students must complete at 
least 15 hours of major course credit at USC Upstate 



Continued on next page 



110 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Chemistry majors may select 
a cognate (12 hours) OR 
a minor (18-21 hours) 

Cognate' 12 

Upper division courses selected with 
advisor's approval 



Electives 



OR 

Minor''2 18-21 

12 hours must be upper-division coursework 



Total Hours Required 



120 



'Minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 

-Up to 6 hours of General Education (less than 300 level) 
may be used to satisfy requirements of a minor. 



Minor in Chemistry 
Student Worksheet 



Minor Requirements*'^'^ 

Chemistry 111, lllL 

Chemistry 112, 112L 

Chemistry 331 

Chemistry 332 



Students must take a minimum of 10 hours 
from at least three of five fields below: 

Organic Chemistry 

□ Chemistry 33 IL: 1 
Organic Chemistry I Lab 

□ Chemistry 332L: 1 
Organic Chemistry II Lab 

Q Chemistry 530: Spectroscopy 3 

Q Chemistry 534: Polymer Chemistry 3 



Biochemistry 

G Chemistry 581: Biochemistry I 3 

□ Chemistry 582: Biochemistry II 3 



'Up to 6 hours of General Education (less than 300 level) 
may be used to satisfy requirements of a minor 

-Minimum grade ofC is required for all coursework. 

^A minimum of 12 hours of upper division coursework is 
required. 



Chemistry 583L: Biochemistry Lab 1 





_ Analytical Chemistry 
Chemistry 321: 




□ 


3 




Quantitative Analysis 




u 


Chemistry 32 IL: 
Quantitative Analysis Lab 


1 


u 


Chemistry 522 and 522L: 
Instrumental Analysis 

_ Physical Chemistry 
Chemistry 541: 


4 


G 


3 




Physical Chemistry I 




□ 


Chemistry 541L: 
Physical Chemistry I Lab 


1 


u 


Chemistry 542: 
Physical Chemistry II 


3 


a 


Chemistry 542L: 
Physical Chemistry II Lab 

Inorganic Chemistry 


I 


u 

Tota 


Chemistry 511: 
Inorganic Chemistry 

il Hours Required 


3 
24 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



111 



Bachelor of Science 

Major in Engineering Technology Management* 

Student Worksheet 

This Bachelor's program requires an associate's degree in Engineering Technology 
from a technical college before full acceptance into the degree program. 



General Education Requirements^ 
I. Communication 

SEGLlOl andSEGL102 



II. 



III. 



IV. 



VI. 



VIII. 



SSPH 201 



Mathematics 7 

SMTH 127 

SMTH 141 

Information Teclinology 3 
SCSC 138, 150; SIMS 101 

Natural Science 8 

Two courses from the fe}llowing (at least 
one with the associated lab) 

SASTlll/L;SBIO101/L,l 02/L, 

1 10/L, 242/L; SCHM 101/L, 109/L, 

111/L,112/L;SGEL 101/L, 102/L, 103/L, 123/L; 
SPHS 101/L,201/L,202/L,211/L,212/L 

Arts and Humanities 8 

One fine arts course: 

SAAS 204; SATH 101, 105, 106; 

SMUS 110, 140;STHE 161, 170 
One course from the fryllowing: (no more 
than 3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 1 1 , 1 02; SATH 

101, 105, 106;SEGL250, 252, 275,279, 280, 
283, 289, 290, 291; SFLM 240, 341, 342, 475, 
481; SMUS 110, 140; SPHL 102,211; 
SREL103;STHE 161, 170 

Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

Placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course (Students placing 
into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in electives, 
if hours are required in the major). 



VII. History 



SHSTlOl, 102, 105, or 106 



Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

Two courses from the fi)llowing with two 

disciplines represented: 

SANT102;SAAS201;SECO221, 

222;SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201, 301 
320; SPSY 101; SSOC 101; SWST 101 



Major Requirements*'^ "^'^ 

Technical courses in discipline^ 3 1 

(transfer in block with Associate's Degree) 
Eng. Tech Mgt. 320: Engineering 4 

Cost Analysis 
Eng. Tech Mgt. 330: Engineering 4 

Work Analysis 
Eng. Tech Mgt. 370: Systems 4 

Decision Making 

Eng. Tech Mgt. 410: Engineering 4 

Teams Theory and Practice 
Eng. Tech Mgt. 415: Quality 4 

Practices 
Eng. Tech Mgt. 420: Engineering 4 

Project Mgt. 
Eng. Tech Mgt. 499: 3 

Senior Seminar 

Supporting Courses 6 

Economics 291 : Probability and 3 

Statistics 

Economics 292: Statistical Inference 3 



Cognate 12 

Two courses from the fr)llowing: 

SHAD 347, 350, 352, 371, 372, 374, 

377; SECO 321, 326; SEGL 371; SGIS 370, 380; SIMS 
345, 346, 347; SPHL 3 1 or 3 1 1 (not both); SPSY 311; 
SSOC 347; SSPH 315, 380 

Two courses fi-om the fr)llowing: 

SBAD 420, 456, 457, 458, 47 1 , 475, 

476; SGIS 571, 572; SSPH 448 

Elective 3 



Total Hours Required 



124 



' Program Entry Requirements: Students must possess an associate 
degree in an Engineering Technology area approved under the 2+2 
articulation plan with participating technical colleges. Students may 
be admitted to the program, but may take no more than 12 hours of 
SETM courses without the appropriate associate degree. 
^ A maximum of 76 hours, including 31 hours of technical courses, may 
be transferred from a technical college curriculum. All courses trans- 
ferred for degree credit must be a minimum grade of "C. " 
■* The successful completion of Mathematics 141 with a minimum grade 
of C fulfills Group II requirements. The additional hours are electives. 
^ A minimum grade ofC is required. 

^ To receive an Engineering Technology Management degree, students 
must complete at least 15 hours of major course credit at USC Up- 
state. 

" Technical content transfers in from the associate degree in an Engi- 
neering Technology area. 



112 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology Management 
Suggested Course Sequence 

Freshman and sophomore level courses are taken as part of a required technical college associate's degree in an 
approved engineering technology area. A grade of "C" or better is required for all courses transferred for degree credit. 

Freshman and Sophomore Years (60 hours) 
The following courses are typically completed during the Freshman and Sophomore years in Engineering 
Technology programs. Consult your technical college course schedule for specific engineering technology 
program requirements and optimum course sequencing. 

English 101 3 

Speech 201 or English 102 3 

Precalculus 1 or Elective 3 

Precalculus II 3 

Information Technology 3 

Natural Science 4 

Natural Science 4 

Fine Arts (art, music, theater) 3 

Social and Behavioral Science 3 

Technical content Minimum of 31 

Junior Year (34 hours) 
An associate degree in Engineering Technology must be completed within 12 semester hours of admission to 
the B.S. degree program. 

Fall (17 hours) 

English 102 or Speech 201 3 

Calculus 1 (SMTH 141) 4 

Probability and Statistics (SECO 291) 3 

Junior-Level Cognate 3 

Engineering Cost Analysis (SETM 320) 4 

Spring (17 hours) 

Foreign Language 102 3 

Statistical Inference (SECO 292) 3 

Junior-Level Cognate 3 

Engineering Work Analysis (SETM 330) 4 

Systems Decision Making (SETM 370) 4 

Senior Year (30 hours) 
Fall (17 hours) 

Arts and Humanities 3 

Social and Behavioral Science 3 

Senior-Level Cognate 3 

Engineering Teams Theory and Practice (SETM 410) 4 

Quality Practices (SETM 4 15) 4 

Spring (13 hours) 

History 111 or 112 3 

Senior-Level Cognate 3 

Engineering Project Management (SETM 420) 4 

Senior Seminar (SETM 499) 3 

College of Arts and Sciences 113 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Psychology 

The Department of Psychology, in the College of Arts and Sciences, offers the Bachelor of Science and the Bachelor 
of Arts degrees in psychology. A minor is also offered in psychology. In general, assignments for courses numbered 300 
or above are more rigorous and the grading standards more demanding than for courses numbered 299 or lower. 

Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts* 
Major in Psychology 
Student Worksheet 
General Education Courses 



I. Communication 

SEGL 101-andSEGL 102- 



III. 



IV. 



SSPH201 



6 
3 

3-4 



Mathematics 

One math course: 

SMTH 121, 122, 126, 127, 

141, 142,231 
One course from math, logic or statistics: 3-4 
SMTH 122, 127, 141, 142,202, 231; 

SLGC 205, 207 

Information Technology 

SCSC 138, 150; SIMS 101 3 

Natural Science 

Two courses from the following (at least 7-8 

one with the associated lab) 

S AST 1 1 1 /L; SBIO 1 1 /L, 1 02/L, 

1 1 0/L, 206, 240, 242/L, 270; SCHM 

101/L, 105, 106, 107, 109/L, 111/L, 
112/L; SGEG 201, 202; SGEL 101/L, 
102/L, 103/L, 120, 121, 123/L, 131; 
SPHS 101/L,201/L, 202/L, 211/L, 
212/L 

Arts and Humanities* 

*no more than 3 credit hours from a specific 
discipline will be accepted for the General 
Education Requirement under Arts & Humanities 

One fine arts course: 3 

SAAS204;SATH 101, 105, 106; 

SMUS 110, 140;STHE 161, 170 
One course from the following 3 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 

101, 105, 106; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 
283, 289, 290. 291; SFLM 240, 341, 342, 475, 
481; SMUS 110, 140; SPHL 102, 211; 
SREL 103;STHE 161, 170 



VI. Foreign Language and Culture 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 3 
SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

or placement in a 201 or higher level 

language course** 
(**placement in a higher level language course 
satisfies this requirement but does not provide 3 
hours of credit toward graduation) 



VII. History 



SHST 101, 102, 105 or 106 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Two courses from the following with two 
disciplines represented: 

SAAS 201 ;SANT 102; SECO 221, 

222; SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201, 301 

320;SSOC lOLSWSTlOl 



Major Requirements^ '* 

Psychology 101 

Psychology 225 

Psychology 325 



At least FIVE CORE courses 

from the following; 

One from the Experimental Core 

Psychology 303: Psychology 

of Learning and Memory 

Psychology 304: Cognitive 

Psychology 

Psychology 305: Sensation and 

Perception 

Psychology 308: Physiological 

Psychology 



3 
3 
4 

15 



U 



Continued on next page 



'Normally students will receive a Bachelor of Science 
degree. Students who wish to pursue a Bachelor of Arts 
degree must complete foreign language 201 and 202. 
^A minimum grade ofC is required. 



114 



^A minimum grade ofC is required in all major courses. 

''18 credit hours of psychology (12 credit hours from 
core courses, three credit hours from courses at the 
400 -level and three credit hours from senior seminar) 
applied toward graduation must be awarded by USC 
Upstate. In order to enroll in senior seminar, a student 
must have completed all of the prerequisite courses with a 
minimum grade ofC. 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



One from the Social Core 



a 


Psychology 302: Developmental 




Psychology ] 


u 


Psychology 307: Social Psychology 


□ 


Psychology 309: Personality 




Psychology 


□ 


Psychology 310: Abnormal 




Psychology 


□ 


Psychology 311: Industrial and 




Organizational Psychology 


Three additional core courses 



One 400-level psychology course (except spsy < 



Minor Option^ 18-21 

See Minor section of catalog for description 
and requirements 



Electives 13-25 

(for a B.A. degree 6 hours of elective credit 
must be Foreign Language 201-202) 



Elective psychology courses 9 

selected from core and/or other psychology 
courses 



Total Hours Required-' 



120 



Senior Seminar:' 
SPSY 502 



Psychology majors may select either a cognate 
(12 hours) OR a minor (18-21 hours) 



Cognate Option^ 12 

(Courses selected in conjunction witli 
psyciiology advisor. See Cognate section of 
catalog for description) 



In order to enroll in senior seminar, a student must have 
completed all the prerequisite courses with a minimum 
grade ofC. 

'A minimum grade ofC is required. 

^18 credit hours of psychology' (12 credit hours from 
core courses, three credit hours from courses al the 
400 -level and three credit hours from senior seminar) 
applied toward graduation must be awarded by USC 
Upstate. In order to enroll in senior seminar, a student 
must have completed all of the prerequisite courses with a 
minimum grade ofC. 



Minor in Psychology*'^ 
Student Worksheet 



Required Courses 

Psychology 101 



Two Courses from the Experimental Core 
(courses numbered 303, 304, 305, 308) 



Two Courses from the Social Core 
(courses numbered 302, 307, 309, 3 10, 3 11 ) 

One Advanced Course numbered at the 
400-level (except Psychology 499) 



One Elective Course at the 300-level 
or above 



Total hours required 



21 



'a minimum grade ofC is required for all courses. 

^ Nine credit hours ofpsychology (three credit hours from 
experimental core, three credit hoursfrom social core, and 
three credit hoursfrom advanced courses) applied toward 
graduation must be awarded by USC Upstate. 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



115 



History^ Political Science^ 
Philosophy and American Studies 

The Department of History, Political Science, Philosophy and American Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences 
offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in history and political science. Minors are offered in history, political science, philoso- 
phy and American studies. Courses are also offered in the areas of anthropology, logic, military science and religion. In 
general, assignments for courses numbered 300 or above are more rigorous and the grading standards more demanding 
than for courses numbered 299 or lower. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Major in History 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Courses 

I. Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



VII. History 



SHST 102 



SSPH201 



II. Mathematics 6-8 

One math course: 

SMTH 120, 121, 122, 126, 127 

141, 142,231 

One course from math, logic or statistics: 

SECO 29 1 ; SLGC 205, 207; SMTH 

102, 120, 121, 122, 126, 127, 141, 
202, 231; SPSY225; SSOC 201 

III. Information Technology 

SCSC 138, 150; SIMS 101 3 

IV. Natural Science 7-8 

Two courses from the following (at least 

one with the associated lab) 

SAST 111/L;SB10 101/L, 102/L, 

1 1 0/L, 206, 240, 242/L, 270; SCHM 

101/L, 105, 106, 107, 109/L, 111/L, 
1 12/L; SGEG 201; SGEL 101/L, 
102/L, 103/L, 120, 121, 123/L, 131; 
SPHS 101/L, 201/L,202/L, 21 1/L, 
2 12/L 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

Two courses from the following with two 

disciplines represented: 

SAAS 201; SANT 102; SECO 221, 

222; SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201, 301 
320; SPSY 101; SSOC 101; SWST 101 



Major Requirements^'^ 

SHST 300 

History courses numbered 301 or higher 
At least one course must be taken in each 
of the following areas: 



3 
21 



United States history (courses 

numbered 301-323, 351-352, 492, 

495, 496) 

European history (courses numbered 

330-355,493,496) 

Non-Western history (courses 

numbered 313, 360-391, 494, 496 



Arts and Humanities 

One fine arts course: 

SAAS 204; S ATH 101, 

SMUS 110;STHE 161 



105, 
170 



06; 



One course from the following: (no more 3 
than 3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 
SAMS 101, 102; SEGL 250, 252, 

275, 279, 280, 283, 289, 290, 291; 

SFLM 240; SPHL 102,211; 

SREL 103 

VI. Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 
SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

or placement in a 201 or higher level 

language course. 



History 500: Senior Seminar 



Continued on next page 



'a minimum grade ofC is required in all major courses. 
- Fifteen credit hours of history, including senior seminar, 
applied toward graduation must be awarded by USC 
Upstate. In order to enroll in senior seminar, a student 
must have completed all the prerequisites with a minimum 
grade ofC. 



116 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



History majors may select a cognate (12 hours) 
OR a minor (18-21 hours) 



Supporting Courses 



Cognate' 



12 



OR 
Minor^ 



18-21 



'a minimum grade ofC is required in all cognate or minor 
courses. 



History 101 3 

Government and International 3 

Studies 320 

History 105 3 

History 106 3 

One course selected from 3 

the following: American literature; 
American Studies; art; English 
literature, linguistics, or literary 
theory; history; literature in a 
foreign language; music; philosophy; 
religion; speech, theatre; world 
literature 



Electlves 



11-23 



Total Hours Required 



120 



Minor in History* 
Student Worksheet 



Minor Requirements 

History 105 or 106- 

History 101 or 102" 

Five history courses 15 

at 300-level or above. 

At least one course must be taken in each 

of the following areas^: 

G United States history 

(courses numbered 301-323. 351-352, 

492,495) 

□ European history 

(courses number 330-355, 493) 

□ Non- Western history 

(courses number 313, 360-391. 494) 



Total Hours Required 



21 



'a minimum grade ofC is required in all courses. 

^Courses may also be used as general education credit. 

^With approval, students may apply relevant 400-level 
special topics courses, one-time-only courses, internships, 
and independent studies to the minor 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



117 



Bachelor of Arts 

Major in Political Science 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Courses 
I. Communication 

SEGL 101 and SEGL 102 

SSPH 201 



IV. 



9 

6 
3 
7-8 



II. Mathematics 

One math course: 

SMTH 120, 121, 122, 126, 127 

141, 142,231 

One course from math, logic or statistics: 

SECO 29 1 ; SLGC 205, 207; SMTH 

102, 121, 122, 126, 127, 141, 142, 
231;SPSY225;SSOC201 

III. Information Technology 

SCSC 138, 150; SIMS 101 



Natural Science 



7-8 



Two courses from the following (at least 

one with the associated lab) 

S AST 1 1 1 /L; SBIO 1 1 /L, 1 02/L, 

1 1 0/L, 206, 240, 242/L, 270; SCHM 

101/L, 105, 106, 107, 109/L, 111/L, 
112/L;SGEG201,202;SGEL 101/L, 
102/L, 103/L, 120, 121, 123/L, 131; 
SPHS 101/L, 201/L,202/L, 21 1/L, 
212/L 



Arts and Humanities 

One fine arts course: 

SATH 101, 105, 106 



One course from the following: (no more 3 

than 3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SEGL252;SPHL 102,211; 

SREL 103 

VI. Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 
SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

or placement in a 201 or higher level 

language course 



VII. History 



SHST 101, 102, 105, or 106 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Two courses from the following with two 
disciplines represented: 

SECO 22 1 or SECO 222 

SGIS201 



Major Requirements^ 

Government and 

International Studies 210 
Government and 

International Studies 300 
Government and International 

Studies 301, 349, 385 or 403 
Government and International 

Studies 310 or 320 



□ 



U 



One course from three 9 

of the following four sub-fields 

American Politics 

(SGIS 238, 312, 324, 350, 360, 361, 

363, 364, 365, 450, 45 1 , 452, 462 or 

463) 

International and Comparative 

Politics (SGIS 310, 320, 

326, 327, 330, 340, 400, 420 or 460) 

Public Administration (SGIS 370, 

374,380,445,571 or 572) 

Political Theory (SGIS 385, 386, 403, 

481) 



Other Government and International 
Studies courses 



12 



Government and International 
Studies 500: Senior seminar 



Political Science majors may select either a 
cognate (12 hours) OR minor (18-21 hours). 



Cognate Option' 



12 



'/4 minimum grade ofC is required. 



Continued on next page 



118 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Minor Option^ (Discipline) 



18-21 



Electives 



7-17 



Supporting Courses 

An additional 1 00-level history 3 

course or American Studies course 

Three courses selected from 9 

the following: history, philosophy, 

American studies, religion, 

economics, sociology, anthropology, 
psychology 



Total Hours Required 



120 



' minimum grade ofC is required. 



Minor in Political Science* 
Student Worksheet 



Introductory Course 

SGIS 201 American National Government 3 

Required Course 

SGlS 301 Introduction to Political Science 3 

Course Options 12 

1 2 credit hours from the following list, with no more than 
two courses from any subfield. 

American Government 



International and Comparative Politics 



□ 


SGIS 350: 




Women and American Politics 


u 


SGIS 363: Southern Politics 


□ 


SGIS 364: 




State and Local Government 


u 


SGIS 380: Environmental Policy 


u 


SGIS 450: Constitutional Law 


u 


SGIS 451: 




Civil Rights and Civil Liberties 


1:1 


SGIS 463: 




The American Presidency 



G 


SGIS 310: International Politics 


U 


SGIS 320: Comparative Politics 


u 


SGIS 326: Middle East Politics 


G 


SGIS 327: East Asian Politics 


□ 


SGIS 330: International 




Organizations 


□ 


SGIS 420: Women and Politics: 




A Global Perspective 


U 


SGIS 460: International Law 



Political Process 

□ SGIS 340: U.S. Foreign Policy 

□ SGIS 361: Political Behavior 

□ SGIS 452: Judicial Process 

□ SGIS 462: Legislative Process 

Political Theory 



G 



SGIS 300: Intro to Political Theory 

SGIS 385: American Political 

Thought 

SGIS 403: History of Western 

Political Thought 



'a minimum grade ofC is required in all courses. 



Public Administration 

□ SGIS 370: Intro to 
Public Administration 

□ SGIS 374: Intro to Public Policy 

Total Hours Required 



18 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



119 



Minor in American Studies^'^ 
Student Worksheet 



Note: a minimum grade of "C" is required in all 
courses. A minimum of 12 hours of upper-level course- 
work is required. 

Minor Requirements 

SAMS 101 or 102' 3-6 

Any SAMS Course numbered 

300-level or above- 3-9 



' Students may take both SAMS 101 and 102 if all other 
coursework ;> at the 300-level or above. 
- SAMS 398. Topics may be used more than once with a 
change of topic. 



Additional Coursework 



3-12 



No more than 6 hours from a single group. Only one 
course from the student's major, and the course cannot 
be counted for both major and minor credit. 

Group A: History 

SHST 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307. 310, 
311,312, 313. 320, 321, 322, 323. 380, 381 

Group B: Literature 

SEGL 307, 342, 383, 391, 425, 426, 427, 428, 429, 
430, 447, 455, 480, 481, 482, 483 

Group C: Fine Arts, Journalism and Languages 

SATH 205, 206, 304; SJOU 302, 303, 360, 424, 
425; SMUS 310; SSPN 204, 332, 333; STHE 301 

Group D: Social and Other Sciences 

SANT 102; SGEG 340, 424; SGEL 120, 121, 241; 
SCRJ 310, 320, 321, 342; SECO 301; SGIS 300, 
340, 350, 361, 363, 364, 374, 385, 386, 450, 463; 
SNPA 301; SSOC 301, 310, 31 1, 320, 321, 323, 
325, 327. 328, 329, 330, 333. 335, 337, 341, 343, 
345, 347, 351, 353, 355, 357, 372; SWST 301, 355 



Total Hours Required 



18 



Minor in Philosophy^ 
Student Worksheet 



Required Courses 

Logic (Either SLGC 205 or 207) 3 

History of Philosophy 

(Either SPHL 20 1 or SPHL 202) 3 
Ethics 

(Either SPHL 2 1 1 or SPHL 311) 3 



Additional Philosopy Courses 

(numbered 201 or above) 



Total Hours Required 



18 



'/4 minimum grade ofC is required 



120 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Sociology^ Criminal Justice and Women 's Studies 

The Department of Sociology, Criminal Justice and Women's Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences offers the 
Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology and the Bachelor of Science degree in criminal justice. Minors are offered in sociol- 
ogy, criminal justice, geography and women's studies. In general, assignments for courses numbered 300 or above are more 
rigorous and the grading standards more demanding than for courses numbered 299 or lower. 

Bachelor of Arts 
Major in Sociology 
Student Worksheet 



General Education Courses 
I. Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 

SSPH201 



II. Mathematics 

One math course: 

SMTH 1 20 or SMTH 1 2 1 

One course from math, logic or statistics: 
SSOC201 or SMTH 102 



VI. Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

Placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course (Students placing 
into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in 
electives, if hours are required in the 
major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101 or 102 



III. Information Teclinology 

SCSC 138 or SIMS 101 



IV. 



Natural Science 



7-8 



Two courses from the following (at least 
one with the associated lab) 

SAST 111/L;SBI0 110/L, 206, 240, 

270; SCHM 101/L, 105, 106, 107, 

109/L; SGEG 201, 202; SPHS 101/L 



Arts and Humanities < 

One fine arts course: 

SAAS 204; SATH 101, 105, 106; 

SMUS 110, 140;STHE 161, 170 
One course from the following: (no more 
than 3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 1 1 , 1 02; SEGL 

250, 275, 279, 280, 283, 289, 290, 
291; SEGL 252; SFLM 240, 
342,475,481;SPHL 102,211; 
SREL 103; STHE 161, 170; SATH 
101,105, 106, SMUS 110, 140 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

Two courses from the following with two 

disciplines represented: 

SANT 102; SAAS 201; SECO 221, 

222; SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201, 301 
320; SPSY 101; SSOC 101; SWST 101 



Major Requirements* 



Four core sociology courses 

Sociology 101 

Sociology 301 

Sociology 302 

Sociology 499: Senior Seminar 



Seven additional upper-level sociology 
courses 



12 



21 



Continued on next page 



I minimum grade ofC is required. 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



121 



Sociology majors may select either a cognate 
(12 hours) OR minor (18-21 hours). 



Cognate Option 



12 



Minor Option^'^ 



18-21 



Supporting Courses 

Government 201 3 

SLGC 205 or SLCG 207 3 

Two courses from the following 6 

with two disciplines represented: 

SANT102;SEGL275,279,283,291,30I,307,322,325, 
341, 346, 352, 368, 371; SGEG 121,212, 340; SGIS 310, 
320, 364; SHST 310, 320, 333, 338, 351, 355. 360, 361. 
370, 371, 372, 380, 381, 390, 391; SREL 103; art history; 
SWST 101;SAAS201 



Electives 



4-20 



Total Hours Required 



120 



'a minimum grade ofC is required. 

Note: 15 credit hours ofsociolog}' (beyond SSOC 1 01) 
including senior seminar applied toward graduation, 
must be awarded by USC Upstate. 

^18 hours minimum. 

^12 hours of upper division coursework. 



Minor in Sociology 
Student Worksheet 



Minor Requirements' 



_SSOC 101 
_SSOC 301 
SSOC 302 



Introductory Sociology 3 

Sociological Theory 3 

Sociological Research Methods 3 



Three upper-level sociology courses (303 or above) 9 



Total Hours Required 



18 



'a minimum grade ofC is required in all coursework. 



122 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Bachelor of Science 

Major in Criminal Justice 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Courses 
I. Communicarion 

SEGL 101 and SEGL 102 

SSPH201 



n. 



III. 



\\. 



V. 



Mathematics 

One math course: 

SMTH 1 20 or SMTH 1 2 1 

One course from math, logic or statistics: 
SLGC 205 or SLGC 207 

Information Technolog> 

SCSC 138 or SIMS 101 

Natural Science 



7-8 



Two courses from the following (at least 

one with the associated lab) 

SAST 1 1 1 L; SBIO 1 10 L. 206. 240, 

270: SCHM 101 L. 105. 106. 107, 

109/L; SGEG 201. 202; SGEL 101/L, 
102/L. 103;L. 120, 121, 123/L, 131; 
SPHS 101 L 

Arts and Humanities 6 

One fine arts course: 

SAAS 204: SATH 101, 105, 106: 

SMUS 110. 140:STHE 161. 170 
One course from the following: (no more 
than 3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204: SAMS 101. 102: SATH 

101. 105. 106; SEGL 250. 275. 279. 280. 283. 
289, 290. 291: SEGL 252: SFLM 240. 342. 
475.481: SMUS 110. 140: SPHL 102. 
SREL 103:STHE 161. 170 



M. Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 

SFRN 102: SGRM 102: SSPN 102 

Placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course (Students placing 
into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but 
will have additional hours in 
electives. if hours are required in the 
major). 



Vn. History 



SHST 106 



VIH. Social and Behavioral Sciences 



SPSY 101 
SSOC 101 



Major Requirements' 



SCRJ 101: Introduction to 

Criminal Justice 

SCRJ 210: Policing in America 

SCRJ 220: The Criminal Courts 

SCRJ 230: Introduction to 

Corrections 

SCRJ 361 : Criminal Justice 

Research Methods 

SCRJ 371: Theories of Crime 

SCRJ 501: Criminal Justice 

Senior Seminar 



15 



Additional upper-level 
criminal justice courses 
(A maximum of 6 hours mav be earned from 
SCRJ 391: Field Study or SCRJ 490: Internship) 



'a minimum grade ofC is required in all major courses. 

Note: Fifteen credit hours of criminal justice (beyond SCRJ 
101), including senor seminar, applied toward graduation 
must be awarded by USC Upstate.. 

Continued on next page 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



123 



Criminal justice majors may select a 
cognate (12 hours) OR a minor 
(18-21 hours) 

Cognate* 12 



Supporting Courses 



12 



Minor ' (Discipline) 



18-21 



SGIS 201 : American National 

Government 

Statistics': SMTH 102 or 

SPSY225orSSOC201 

Ethics: SPHL211, 311, or321 

One course of the following: 

SANT 102: SEGL 275; SGEG 121, 

212, 340: SGIS 310, 320; SHST 335, 

338,340,341,360,361,370,371, 

380, 381;SREL103 



Electives 



4-17 



'.4 minimum grade ofC is required. 



Total Hours Required 120 



Minor in Criminal Justice 
Student Worksheet 



Minor Requirements' 

SCRJ 101: 3 

Introduction to Criminal Justice 

SCRJ 371: 3 

Theories of Crime 



Total Hours Required 



21 



Select two of the following three courses: 6 

SCRJ 210: Policing in America 

SCRJ 220: The Criminal Courts 

SCRJ 230: Introduction to Corrections 



Additional upper-level 9 

Criminal Justice courses 

A maximum of 3 hours may he earned from any combi- 
nation of the following: SCRJ 391: Field Study or SCRJ 
490: Internship 



'a minimum grade ofC is required. 



124 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Minor in Women's Studies^ 
Student Worksheet 



Introductory Course^ 

SWST 101: 

Introduction to Women's Studies 

Theory Course 

SWST 301 : Feminist Theory 

and Methods 



Additional Courses 12 

12 credit hours from the following list, with no more 
than two courses from any individual discipline (except 
SWST), and no more than one course from within the 
student's major program (cannot be counted toward 
both the major and minor). ^ 

□ SATH 301: Women and Art 

□ SCRJ 376: Women and Crime 

'Minimum grade of "C" for all courses required. 

- Courses may also be used lo satisfy general education 
requirements. If used for general education, students will 
have satisfied the requirement for the minor and will be 
excused from the credit hour requirements fur the 
preparatory course. 

^With the written approval of a Women's Studies faculty 
member, students may apply relevant special topics 
courses, one-time only courses, internships and independent 
studies to the minor 



SEGL 437: Women Writers 

SGIS 350: Women and American Politics 

SGIS 420: Women and Politics: 

A Global Perspective 

SHST 351: Women in 

Early Modern Europe and America 

SHST 352: Women in Modem Europe 

and America 

SHST 495: Topics in Women's History 

SPSY 442: Psychology of Women 

SSOC 435: Sociology of Women 

SWST 355: U.S. Women's Movement 

SWST 398: Special Topics in 

Women's Studies 

SWST 490 Senior Seminar in 

Women's Studies 

Total Hours Required 



18 



Minor in Geography' 
Student Worksheet 



Required Courses 

Geography 103 

Geography 121 

Geography 201 or 202' 



11 Course Options 9 

3 (9 hours selected from the following) 

4 Geography 201 or 202 4 

4 Geography 212 3 

Geography 340 3 

Geography 424 3 

Total Hours Required 20-21 



'a minimum grade ofC is required 



College of Arts and Sciences 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



125 




Johnson College of Business 
& Economics 



Accreditation 

Business programs are accredited by The Association 
to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB 
International). 

Vision 

The vision of the Johnson College of Business and Eco- 
nomics is to become the school-of-first-choice for an 
excellent baccalaureate business administration education 
for students of the Upstate of South Carolina. 

Mission 

use Upstate's Johnson College of Business and 
Economics provides and delivers excellent undergradu- 
ate business education to a diverse student population. In 
support of this mission, 

• Our educational programs prepare graduates to 
enter and succeed in a variety of business careers in an 
expanding global environment through a focus on current 
and ethical business practices. 

• Our faculty is engaged in intellectual pursuits that 
focus primarily on applied scholarship and teaching excel- 
lence. 

• Our community and serv ice activities are developed 
in partnership with business and professional constituencies 
to enhance the quality of life and economic well being in 
the upstate metropolitan region. 

• As a school, we hold our faculty, staff and students 
accountable for practicing a high degree of personal and 
professional excellence, integrity and civility. 

Program Goals 

The goals of the SBAE for the accomplishment of 
the mission are to: 

• Provide an excellent education to a diverse 
student body 

• Implement the curriculum with a high quality 
faculty 

Degree Programs 

The Johnson College of Business and Economics offers 
programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Business Administration. Minors in business administration 
and economics are also offered. In addition to the Spartanburg 
campus, courses are also offered at the University Center of 
Greenville. Students are invited to visit the Johnson College 
of Business and Economics on the USC Upstate campus to 
explore career opportunities. 

All Johnson College students are required to take the 
specified general education courses. All students then take 
a common business and economics core sequence, spanning 
the full range of business functions. Finally students select 
a concentration. 

Students should begin with the recommended curriculum 
as early as possible. This sequence includes a combination 
of business, economics and general education courses sug- 
gested for each semester in which the student is enrolled. It 
is imperative that students begin their mathematics/statistics 
sequence in the first semester of their freshman year and con- 
tinue this sequence each semester to make adequate progress 
in any of the business concentrations. Students in business 
administration and economics are advised by the faculty from 
the Johnson College of Business and Economics. 

Students not pursuing a Business degree may earn a 
maximum of 29 semester hours in Business courses, exclud- 
ing SECO 221, 222, 291, and 292, providing they meet the 
course prerequisites and have earned 54 credit hours before 



enrolling in 300-level and above courses. 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in Busi- 
ness may also pursue any university approved minor except 
the economics minor and the business administration minor. 
See catalog section concerning minors. Usually, completing 
the degree with a minor will require more than the minimum 
1 20 credit hours to graduate. 

Admission to the Professional Program 
(Upper Division) 

Students seeking a degree in business must be admit- 
ted to the Professional Program (upper division) before 
enrolling in 300-level or above business administration 
(SBAD) and economics (SECO) courses. 

Application Process 

The professional program application form may be ob- 
tained from the School of Business Administration and 
Economics (SBAE) Office of Student Services or on the 
Upstate website. The application must be filed with the 
SBAE Office of Student Services no earlier than the term 
in which students anticipate completing 54 credit hours. 

Application Deadlines 

During the fall semester the deadline is October 1 ; during 
the spring semester, February 1. 

Admission Requirements 

Admission of applicants is based on individual consider- 
ation. Each applicant must fulfill the following require- 
ments: 

• Successful completion of 54 credit hours 

• Cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 

• Completion with a C or better: SEGL 101, SEGL 1 02, 
SSPH201,andSMTH 122 

• Successful completion of SBAD 225 and SECO 
221 or 222 

Conditional Approval 

Students are conditionally approved for professional 
program admission during the semester of application 
to facilitate registration for the following semester. If 
the student's final academic performance for the semes- 
ter does not meet the admission requirements, it is the 
student's responsibility to make the necessary schedule 
adjustments. 

Transfer Students and Conditional Approval 

Transfer students who have met the 54-credit hour and 
GPA requirements at time of admission may be granted 
conditional admission for one semester in orderto complete 
the specific course requirements. 

Graduation Requirements 

In addition to meeting the curriculum requirements 
for a degree in business administration, graduation requires 
a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 and a minimum grade of 
C (Sin SBAD 499) on all upper division Business courses. 
(A grade of D or higher is acceptable for meeting a course 
prerequisite requirement unless otherwise specified in the 
catalog course description.) The highest grade earned on 
any course in business administration and economics is 
applied toward the degree. At least 50 percent of the busi- 
ness and economics credit hours applied toward graduation 
must be awarded by USC Upstate. 



Johnson College of Business and Economics 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



127 



Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 
Student Worksheet 

The Johnson College of Business and Economics is accredited by AACSB International. The Bachelor of Science in Busi- 
ness Administration otTers concentrations in Accounting, Economics/Finance, General Business Administration, Manage- 
ment, and Marketing. 



General Education Courses 

I. Communication 

SEGLlOl andSEGL 102 



SSPH201 



II. 



Mathematics 

SMTH 122orSMTH 141 



6-7 



*Students not placing into SMTH 122 or 141 
must complete the prerequisites before taking 
the required math class. The college level 
prerequisite(s) will count as free elective(s). 
SEC0 291 



III. Information Technology 

SCSC 138 



IV. Natural Science 7-8 

Two courses from the following (at least 
one with the associated lab) 

SAST 111/L;SBI0 110/L, 206, 240, 

270; SCHM 101/L, 105, 106, 107/L. 109/L; 
SGEG 201/L, 202; SGEL 101/L, 102/L, 103/L, 
120, 121, 123/L, 131;SPHS 101/L, 201/L, 202/L 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 

SEC0 221 

One course selected from the following 

SAAS 201; SANT 102; SGEG 101, 

103; SGIS 201. SPSY 101; SSOC 101; 
SWST 101 



Major Course Requirements 



Business Core 

SBAD 

SBAD 

SBAD 

SBAD 

SBAD 

SBAD 

SBAD 

SBAD 

SBAD 

SECO 

SECO 



(required in all majors) 

225 Financial Accounting 3 

226 Managerial Accounting 3 
290 Intro to Business Info Systems 3 
347 Legal Environment of Business 3 
350 Principles of Marketing 3 
363 Business Finance 3 

371 Organizational Mgmt. & Behavior3 

372 Operations Management 3 
478 Business Policy (Senior Seminar) 3 
222 Principles of Microeconomics 3 
292 Statistical Inference 3 



V. Arts and Humanities 6 

One fine arts course: 

^ SAAS 204; S ATH 1 1 , 1 05, 1 06; 

SMUS 110, 140; STHE 161, 170 
One course from the following representing 
a different discipline from the above fine arts 
course. 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 

101, 105, 106; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 
283, 289, 290, 291; SFLM 240; SMUS 110, 
140; SPHL 102, 211; SREL 103; STHE 161, 170 



Concentration Areas 

Accounting' - 

□ SBAD 331 Intermediate Accounting I 3 

□ SBAD 332 Intermediate Accounting II 3 

□ SBAD 333 Cost Accounting 3 

□ SBAD 335 Individual Tax Planning 3 

□ SBAD 433 Accounting Controls Systems 3 

□ SBAD 435 Auditing 3 
Q SBAD 461 International Business Finance 

or SECO 303 International Economics 3 



VI. Foreign Language and Culture 3 

Foreign Language minimum 102 level 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

Students not placing in the 102 level of a 
foreign language must complete the prerequisite ( 101 ). 
This prerequisite will count as a free elective. Students who 
place into the 201 or higher level of a foreign language are 
exempt from the foreign language/culture general education 
requirement but will have additional hours in electives. 

VII. History 3 

SHST 101 or 102 



Continued on next page 

'To be eligible to take the CPA exam in South Carolina, a 
person must have 120 semester credit hours, including 24 hours 
of accounting and 24 hours of other business courses. To qualify 
for the CPA license in South Carolina, a person must have 150 
semester credit hours with a baccalaureate or higher degree with 
36 hours in accounting (with at least 24 hours at the junior level 
or above) and 36 hours of other business courses. Please see an 
accounting advisor concerning additional requirements. 

'Students planning to take the Certified Public Accountant 
examination should take SB.4D 437 Advanced Accounting in ad- 
dition to the accounting concentration courses. 



128 



Johnson College of Business and Economics 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Economics/Finance 

□ SECO30I Commercial & Central Banking 

□ SECO 303 International Economics 

□ SECO 322 Intermediate Macro Theory 
Q SECO 326 Managerial Economics 

□ one of the following: 

SBAD 364 Financial Institutions and Markets 
SBAD 365 Principles of Investments 

□ one of the following: 

SBAD 378 International Business Enterprise 
SBAD 452 International Marketing 
SBAD 461 International Business Finance 
G one of the following: 

SECO 3 1 1 Issues in Economics 
SECO 499 Topics in Economics 
SBAD 333 Cost Accounting 
SBAD 390 Business Tech & Info Systems 
SBAD 499 Business Internship 

General Business Administration 



□ SBAD 333 Cost Accounting 3 

□ SBAD 351 Consumer Behavior 3 

□ SBAD 374 Mgmt. of Human Resources 3 

□ SECO 326 Managerial Economics 3 

□ SBAD 398 Topics in Metro Bus. Studies 3 
□one of the following international courses: 3 

SBAD 378 International Business Enterprise 
SBAD 452 International Marketing 
SBAD 461 International Business Finance 
SECO 303 International Economics 
□one of the following: 3 

SBAD 335 Individual Tax Planning 
SBAD 365 Principles of Investment 
SBAD 390 Business Tech & Info Systems 
SBAD 457 Marketing Research 
SBAD 47 1 New Business Enterprise 
SBAD 499 Business Internship 



SBAD 499 Business Internship 
SECO 303 International Economics 
SECO 326 Managerial Economics 

_Marketing 

SBAD 351 Consumer Behavior 
SBAD 352 Marketing Communications 
SBAD 452 International Marketing 
SBAD 457 Marketing Research 
SBAD 458 Marketing Management 
two of the following: 
SBAD 374 Mgmt. of Human Resources 
SBAD 377 Adv. Organizational Behavior 
SBAD 378 International Business Enterprise 
SBAD 390 Business Technology & 

Information Systems 
SBAD 398 Topics in Metropolitan 

Business Studies 
SBAD 456 Business Marketing 
SBAD 459 Personal Selling & Sales Mgmt. 
SBAD 461 International Business Finance 
SBAD 47 1 New Business Enterprise 
SBAD 499 Business Internship 
SECO 303 International Economics 
SECO 326 Managerial Economics 



Electives 



21-23 



Total Hours Required 



120 



Martagemen t 

□ SBAD 374 Mgmt. of Human Resources 3 

□ SBAD 377 Advanced Organizational Behavior3 

□ SBAD 471 New Business Enterprise 3 

□ SBAD 475 Advanced Operations Mgmt. 3 
□one of the following: 3 

SBAD 378 International Business Enterprise 
SBAD 452 International Marketing 
SBAD 461 International Business Finance 
SECO 303 International Economics 

□ two of the following, if not taken to 6 

□ fulfill above requirements: 

SBAD 378 International Business Enterprise 
SBAD 390 Business Tech & Info Systems 
SBAD 398 Topics in Metropolitan Business Studies 
SBAD 452 International Marketing 
SBAD 461 International Business Finance 
SBAD 476 Statistical Process Control 



Johnson College of Business and Economics 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



129 



Minor in Economics' 
Student Worksheet 



Required Courses' 

SEC0 221 Principles of Macroeconomics- 3 

SECO 222 Principles of Microeconomics- 3 

SECO 322 Intermediate Macroeconomic 3 

Theory 
SECO 326 Managerial Economics 3 



'Minimum grade ofC in all courses 

-6 hours may he used to salisfi' general education credit 



Six additional credit hours to be selected 
from Economics 301, 303, 311, or 499 



Total Hours Required 



18 



Required Courses'" 

SBAD 225 Financial Accounting 

SBAD 221 Principles of Macroeconomics 

or SECO 222 Principles of Microeconomics 

SBAD 350 Principles of Marketing 

SBAD 371 Organizational Management 

and Behavior 



Minor in Business Administration 
Student Worksheet 

Two additional courses to be selected 
from 300-level SBAD or SECO courses 
Recommended courses: SBAD 347, 351, 369, 374, 
and 390 



Total Hours Required 



18 



'Up to 6 hours of General Education (<300 level) may be used to satisfi' requirements of a minor 

-Minimum grade ofC in all coursework. 

■A minimum of 12 hours of upper division coursework is required. 



Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 
Recommended Curriculum Schedule 



Freshman Year — Fall 

English 101 

Mathematics 121 or 122 
Computer Science 138 
Foreign Language 
History 101 or 102 

Freshman Year — Spring 

English 102 

Mathematics 122 or elective 

Natural Science 

Foreign Language or free elective 

Business 290 



Sophomore Year- 
Speech 201 
Fine Arts 
Economics 221 
Economics 291 
Business 225 



-Fall 



Sophomore Year — Spring 

Arts and Humanities 
Economics 222 
Economics 292 
Business 226 
Free elective 

Junior Year — Fall 

Natural Science 

Business 350 

Business 371 

Business concentration course 

Free elective 

Junior Year — Spring 

Social Science elective 

Business 347 

Business 363 

Business 372 

Business concentration course 



Senior Year — Fall 

Free elective 

Free elective 

Business concentration course 

Business concentration course 

Business concentration course 

Senior Year — Spring 

Business 478 

Free elective 

Free elective 

Business concentration course 

Business concentration course 



130 



Johnson College of Business and Economics 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 




School of Education 



The School of Education is a nationally accredited 
professional school with the chief responsibility of prepar- 
ing teachers for early childhood, elementary, middle and 
secondary school certification. The School of Education 
exercises responsibility for decisions directly affecting 
the teacher education curriculum and each major aspect 
of the teacher education process. The School of Education 
offers programs in early childhood education, elementary 
education and middle grades education leading to the 
Bachelor of Arts degree, in physical education and special 
education leading to a Bachelor of Science degree, and 
in secondary education leading to either the Bachelor 
of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. The unit offers 
Master's of Education degrees in early childhood educa- 
tion, elementary education and special education with a 
concentration in visual impairment. In addition to their 
basic task of teaching professional education coursework, 
the faculty of the school undertake research projects that 
contribute to improvement in the theory and practice of 
teacher education. Faculty members conduct research, 
publish scholarly articles, and engage in service activities 
designed to assist teachers, students, administrators, and 
other educators. They sponsor various workshops and con- 
ferences planned specifically for the staffs of elementary, 
middle and secondary schools; often these are cooperative 
efforts with other agencies. They also cooperate with a 
number ofbureaus and clinics developed to augment public 
school programs and to provide specialized services to the 
educational community. 

use Upstate has formed a partnership with USC 
Sumter to serve students in the Sumter area who are in- 
terested in pursuing a baccalaureate degree in either early 
childhood or elementary education. Students interested 
in becoming certified teachers will complete their first 
two years of general education at USC Sumter and then 
complete the professional education program of USC 
Spartanburg. Junior- and senior-level professional edu- 
cation courses will be offered either on the USC Sumter 
campus via distance education technology or in the public 
schools in the Sumter area. 

The School of Education maintains a curriculum 
resources center for the use of USC Upstate students, 
faculty, staff and area public school teachers. This facility 
provides curriculum aids for instructors at all levels. 

The Burroughs Child Development Center gives stu- 
dents an opportunity to observe and to work with children 
ages three months to six years in a laboratory setting. It 
offers high quality child care to students and citizens of 
the community. 

USC Upstate School of Education Conceptual 
Framework Summary 

According to the National Council for the Ac- 
creditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), a conceptual 
fi-amework is: ".. .an underlying structure in a professional 
education unit that gives conceptual meanings through an 
articulated rationale to the unit's operation, and provides 
direction for programs, courses, teaching, candidate 
performance, faculty scholarship and service, and unit 
accountability." 

The following are components of the USC Upstate School 
of Education conceptual framework: 



The USC Upstate School of Education Vision 

The use Upstate School of Education aims to be 
recognized nationally for its outstanding teacher prepa- 
ration programs whose graduates are excellent, learner- 
centered practitioners and professionals. 

The USC Upstate School of Education Mission 

To prepare effective teachers who are reflective 
practitioners and professionals. 
To serve the needs of schools in the state of 
South Carolina, particularly the upstate, working 
collaboratively with K-12 school personnel. 

• To advance understanding of how teaching and 
learning occur effectively. 

The USC Upstate School of Education Core Dispositions 

• The faculty and candidates of the USC Upstate 
School of Education value reflective teaching 
practice. 

• The faculty and candidates of the USC Upstate 
School of Education value learner-centered 
pedagogy. 

• The faculty and candidates of the USC Upstate 
School of Education value performance-based 
assessment. 

• The faculty and candidates of the USC Upstate 
School of Education are committed to and affirm 
diversity. 

• The faculty and candidates of the USC Upstate 
School of Education are committed to profes- 
sional responsibility. 

The USC Upstate School of Education Philosophy 

The faculty members and administrators of the SOE 
have developed a set of consistent principles and values 
that serves as the foundation of the school's approach to 
curriculum, pedagogy and program development. 

• A general exposure to and an appreciation of 
the traditional liberal arts and sciences of both 
western and non-weslem traditions. 

• A specific exposure to the most up-to-date peda- 
gogical theories and practices. 

• A set of ethical principles, values, and disposi- 
tions. 

• A commitment to the principle of equality of 
educational opportunity for all students regard- 
less or group or individual differences. 

• A commitment to knowledge of both theory 
and practice and an understanding of how one 
informs and strengthens the other. 

Theoretical Underpinnings of the 

USC Upstate School of Education Program 

The philosophy of the SOE is consistent with the ten- 
ants of progressivism and constructivism. Practices and 
behaviors consistent with these approaches include: 

• Application of problem-solving and scientific 
inquiry; 

• Use of cooperative learning experiences and 
self-discipline; 

Emphasis on how to think not what to think with 
the teacher serving as a guide; 
Appreciation of the interdisciplinai^ nature of 
learning; 



132 



School of Education 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Preparation of all students for full participation 

in a democracy. 
Guiding Principles of the USC Upstate School of 
Education 

In accordance with its mission, philosophy, and 
theoretical orientation, the SOE follows these guiding 
principles based on the Interstate New Teacher Assess- 
ment and Support Consortium (INTASC) and the South 
Carolina Assistance, Development and Evaluation of 
Professional Teaching (ADEPT) standards. Teachers 
prepared at USC Upstate: 

demonstrate competence as effective long-range 
instructional planners; 

demonstrate competence as effective daily in- 
structional planners; 

demonstrate competence in the areas of student 
assessment and reflective self-assessment; 
establish high expectations for all learners; 
are knowledgeable of and capable of implement- 
ing a variety of instmctional strategies which 
utilize state of art instructional technology; 
possess thorough and accurate knowledge of 
the content they teach; 

effectively monitor student learning and provide 
meaningful feedback to students; 
maintain a classroom environment that promotes 
and facilitates learning; 
manage their classrooms effectively with equity, 
firmness, and fairness; 

strive to develop as a teacher both professionally 
and personally. 
Guiding Principles of USC Upstate Graduate 
Education Programs 

Using the model teacher paradigm captured in the 
propositions of the National Board for Professional Teach- 
ing Standards, USC Upstate graduate programs are built 
around these propositions. Teachers completing USC 
Upstate graduate programs: 

• are committed to students and their learning; 

• are knowledgeable of their subject matter and 
related pedagogy; 

manage and monitor student learning; 

• reflect on their practice; 

• participate in learning communities. 

Multicultural/Diversity Perspectives in USC Upstate 
Teacher Education Programs 

Its mission, philosophy, principles and organizing 
themes serve as the root of the USC Upstate School of 
Education's commitment to multicultural education. 
Graduates of SOE programs as reflective teachers: 

• believe that all children can learn; 

• create a learning environment that is anti dis- 
criminatory; 

• understand, respect, and accommodate for group 
and individual differences; 

• instruct for empathy and tolerance; 

• instruct for altruism; 
promote justice. 

Performance Assessment in USC Upstate Teacher 
Education Programs 

The USC Upstate SOE assessment systems moni- 



tor and measure candidate progress through both the 
undergraduate and graduate programs on a continuous 
basis. At both levels, portfolios are the major tool used 
to assess both the performance of the candidates and 
the quality of programs. Portfolios for undergraduate 
students, introduced in SEDF 210: Foundations of Edu- 
cation, are aligned with INTASC and ADEPT standards; 
undergraduate portfolios are developed over the course of 
programs and finally completed during the student teach- 
ing semester. Graduate portfolios, introduced during the 
Portfolio Introduction and Training Session, are aligned 
with propositions of the National Board for Professional 
Teaching Standards (NBPTS). Graduate portfolios are 
presented and defended before a five-member panel dur- 
ing the respective seminar classes; a successful defense 
is required for graduation. 

Admission to the Professional Program 
Students must apply to the School of Education for 
admission to the professional program, which covers the 
juniorand senioryears. The professional program applica- 
tion form may be obtained from the school office and must 
be filed with that office at the conclusion of the term in 
which students complete 60 semester hours of study. 

Admission of applicants is based on individual 
consideration. Each applicant must fulfill the following 
requirements: 

completion of English 101 and 102 and Speech 
201 or their equivalents, with grades of C or 
better; 

• successful completion of the prerequisites for 
Mathematics 121; 

• grade of C or better in support courses com- 
pleted; 

• cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 on at least 60 
hours earned; 

• the achievement of passing scores on the Praxis 
Pre-professional skills test (PPST) or received 
a South Carolina State Board of Education ap- 
proved score on the SAT or ACT examination; 

• two satisfactory recommendations with one 
coming from the general faculty and one from 
the School of Education faculty; and 

• personal affirmation of non-criminal back- 
ground 

Action is taken on a student's application for admis- 
sion to the professional program as soon as the academic 
records are available. Students who are accepted enter 
the professional program. Students whose applications 
are denied are advised of their alternatives. 

Students who plan to meet the requirements for a 
teaching certificate in secondary education while enrolled 
in another school of the University should consult with 
the dean of the School of Education. The dean assigns an 
advisor in the School of Education to guide the student 
through the professional sequence of courses. Such consul- 
tation should be held as early as possible in the student's 
undergraduate career to ensure adequate familiarity with 
teacher education requirements. Students enrolled in other 
schools of the University should take particular care to 
inquire about the School of Education and state certifica- 
tion requirements. 

Education courses at the 400-level and above may be 



School of Education 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



133 



taken only after admission to the professional program. 
Students who complete the professional program, pass the 
Pra\is II Content Area Examination, complete observations 
using the Assistance, Development, and Evaluation of 
Professional Teaching (ADEPT) instrument, and receive 
FBI fingerprint clearance fiilfill initial certification require- 
ments of the South Carolina State Board of Education. 

Post-Baccalaureate Work toward Teacher 

Certification 

Students with a baccalaureate degree attending USC 
Upstate to complete South Carolina requirements for 
initial teacher certification (referred to as "certification 
only students") have their record of college/university 
coursework evaluated by the Associate Dean of the School 
of Education. Credit is granted for all general education 
courses (with the exception of general education mathemat- 
ics coursework for the Early Childhood, Elementary, and 
Special Education programs). For all students evidence 
of a "C" or better must appear on the student's transcript 
for a two-course English composition sequence and public 
speaking. All Early Childhood and Elementary majors 
must satisfactorily complete a course in Children's Litera- 
ture. All Special Education: LD majors must satisfactorily 
complete a course in Children's Literature or Adolescent 
Literature. In addition "certification only students" must 
complete ALL specific requirements in professional edu- 
cation and, for middle grades and secondary majors, ALL 
specific requirements in the area(s) of academic content 
concentration. The Dean may exercise his/her prerogative 
in accepting coursework. 

An individual holding a baccalaureate degree who 
wishes to earn certification through the USC Upstate 
"certification only" program, must have a cumulative 
undergraduate GPA of 2.5 and have passed all parts of 
PRAXIS I. 

An individual holding a baccalaureate degree with a 
cumulative GPA between 2.0 and 2.5 may be considered for 
conditional admission to the "certification only" program i f 

( 1 ) the degree was awarded three or more years earlier and 

(2) the individual has passed all three parts of PRAXIS I. 
To gain full admission, the individual must earn a 2.5 GPA 
on the first 1 2 hours of coursework and complete all other 
requirements for admission to the professional program. 
To continue in the professional program, candidates must 
maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5. 

Admission to Directed Teaching 

Students who wish to enroll in directed teaching 
must apply a year in advance of the intended semester of 
student teaching. The following are requirements for all 
students admitted to directed teaching: 

• prior admission to the professional program; 

• completion of at least three-fourths of all content 
concentration course work with a grade of C or 
better in each course completed; 

grade of C or better in support courses com- 
pleted; 
completion of 90 semester hours; 

• 2.5 cumulative GPA; 

• completion of all education methods courses 
with a grade of C or better in each; and 
completion of Mathematics 231,232 and 233 with 



a grade of C or better for early childhood educa- 
tion majors, elementary education majors and 
special education: learning disabilities majors; 

• successful presentation of portfolio; 

submission of an FBI fingerprint card and receive 
clearance prior to student teaching; 
completion of a South Carolina Department of 
Education application for teacher certification. 

In addition to these general requirements, there are 
specific course prerequisites for each major field. No edu- 
cation course may serve as a prerequisite for a subsequent 
education course until it has been completed with a grade 
of C or better. These prerequisites may be changed from 
time to time at the discretion of the school. 

Students are responsible for enrolling in the appropri- 
ate corequisite coursework with directed teaching. It is the 
responsibility of students to secure from the school office 
an updated list of prerequisites for directed teaching in 
their major and to arrange their courses of study with their 
education advisor so as to meet those prerequisites. 

Transfer A dmission 

Transfer students with fewer than 60 semester hours 
of credit may take courses in the School of Education if 
they meet all university admission requirements. Transfer 
students who have earned 60 hours or more must meet the 
admission criteria for the professional program at the time 
of their initial application for admission to the School of 
Education as a major. Criteria are available in the school 
office. Only 64 semester hours of credit may be accepted 
for transfer from a two-year institution and applied toward 
the professional degree. 

Undergraduate Transfer Credit 

Education majors from other colleges and universi- 
ties wishing to transfer courses into any of the education 
programs must have all transcripts evaluated by the dean 
or associate dean in the School of Education. The dean 
and associate dean, following the USC Upstate School of 
Education Policy Manual guidelines, determine the courses 
accepted to fulfill requirements of any undergraduate 
education program. Any professional education courses 
considered for transfer must have been completed within 
seven years of matriculating at USC Upstate. Professional 
education courses more than seven years old will not be 
accepted for transfer. 

Continuation Standards 

After being admitted to the professional program, 
students must maintain at least a 2.5 GPA for retention in 
the program; this is in excess of the minimum GPA required 
by the University for continuing enrollment. Students who 
do not maintain a 2.5 GPA cannot enroll in any education 
courses above the 400-level. 

Academic Requirements 

No education course may serve as a prerequisite for a 
subsequent education course until it has been successfully 
completed with a grade of C or better. 

A minimum grade of C is required for any course 
submitted for fulfillment of professional education, major 
concentration and support course requirements. 

Students who fail to achieve a minimum grade of C 
in any professional education course will be dismissed 
from the program. Students may reapply to the program by 



13^ 



School of Education 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



submitting a letter of petition for readmission to the Dean 
of the School of Education for consideration by the School 
of Education Appeals Committee. Readmitted students 
who subsequently receive a second grade of below C in 
any professional education course will be permanently 
dismissed from the program. 

Evaluation 

In addition to evaluations described in course syllabi, 
students" competencies relative to School of Education 
objectives and criteria are evaluated both in professional 
education courses and during directed teaching. Every 
applicant for admission to the professional program under- 
goes an appraisal by the advisor. This appraisal provides a 
source of evaluation on non-academic as well as academic 
factors relative to teaching potential. Portfolio assessment 
provides further evidence of each student's professional 
growth and development over time. 

Degree Programs 

The School of Education has developed curricula lead- 
ing to the baccalaureate in six broad fields; early childhood, 
elementary, middle grades, secondary, physical, and special 
education. Although the number of credit hours required 
for graduation varies to some extent with the subject that 
the student prepares to teach, a minimum of 120 hours is 
required for any baccalaureate in the School of Education. 
Students are assigned an advisor with whom they should 
plan in advance their program of study for each semester 
or summer session. 

The School of Education reserves the right to change 
requirements and modify programs as necessary to fulfill 
national accreditation and state certification requirements. 
Students must periodically request updated information 
from the school. 

Early Childhood Education. The early childhood 
education program provides preparation for teaching in 
four- and five-year kindergartens and in the primary grades 
(PK-3). A substantial portion of the curriculum consists 
of course work in the liberal arts to establish a broad edu- 
cational background prior to the professional sequence of 
courses. The professional sequence provides content and 
direct opportunities for field clinical experience. The final 
experience is a semester-long student teaching assignment 
of which half is in a pre-primary (4K or 5K) setting and 
half in a primary setting (grades 1 , 2 or 3 ). 

Elementary Education. The program prepares stu- 
dents to teach in grades 2-6. The program consists of a 
general liberal arts background, professional educational 
coursework and clinical field experiences. 

During the semester in which students are enrolled 
in directed teaching (SEDL 468), they spend all of each 
school day for a period of fifteen weeks in the elementary 
school to which they are assigned. 

Middle Grades Education. The program in middle 
grades education prepares students to teach in grades 5-8. 
The program emphasizes the particular physical, emotional, 
attitudinal, and intellectual needs of adolescents as well as 
the organizational, curricular, and pedagogical practices 
of the middle school. This is achieved through a core of 
general liberal arts coursework, professional education 
coursework (which includes field-based practicum ex- 
periences in middle schools), student teaching in middle 



school settings, and intensive coursework in two areas of 
academic concentration. 

Secondary Education. The program in secondary 
education prepares students to teach in grades 9-12 and 
does so through a core of general liberal arts course work, 
professional education course work, including field-based 
clinical experiences, a student teaching experience, and 
intensive course work in a specific area of subject special- 
ization. The secondary education curriculum may lead to 
either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree, 
depending upon the chosen area of subject specialization. 
The Bachelor of Arts degrees in English and in social studies 
education require two semesters of foreign language study. 
Areas of subject specialization in secondary education at 
use Upstate include biology, chemistry, English, history, 
mathematics and Spanish. 

Special Education: Learning Disabilities. The 
Bachelor of Science in Special Education/Learning Dis- 
abilities prepares future teachers to serve the needs of 
special education students with learning disabilities in both 
regular classrooms and special education resource rooms. 
Preparation for teaching students with learning disabilities 
emphasizes appropriate services, curricula, assessment, 
and instruction required by students with special needs to 
facilitate their participation in the K- 1 2 general education 
curriculum. Technology, collaborative and consultation 
skills, applications of research, and parent consultation 
skills are stressed throughout the program. 

Practicum experiences begin the first semester of 
the professional program and continue throughout the 
program. Content disabilities instructors and their stu- 
dents collaborate with regular education content methods 
instructors and their students, modeling the collaboration 
expected in professional settings. In addition to working 
with individual students with specific disabilities and 
working as aides in special education settings, students 
have two seven-week field placements: one placement in 
a special education resource setting, the other placement 
in a regular education classroom that includes students 
with learning disabilities. 

Physical Education. The Physical Education major 
has two areas of concentration. The Physical Education 
Teacher Education (PETE ) concentration prepares students 
to teach physical education in grades K-12. In addition 
to a core program in the liberal arts, students undertake 
studies in the professional education area as well as in- 
depth study in physical education. Directed teaching 
for PETE majors is arranged at both the elementary and 
secondary levels. 

For students desiring a program in physical educa- 
tion that is not oriented toward K- 1 2 classroom teaching, 
the School of Education offers the Fitness-Recreation 
concentration. 



School of Education 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



135 



III. 



IV. 



VI. 



Bachelor of Arts in Education 
Major in Early Childhood Education 
Student Worksheet 
General Education Requirements 



Communication 

SEGLlOl andSEGL 102 



SSPH201 



II. Mathematics and Logic 

SMTH 121 and 231 



Information Technology 

SCSC 138 

Natural Sciences 

SBIO 110/L 

SPHS 101/LorSCHM 

105, 106, 107/L, 109/L 



01/L, 



Arts and Humanities 6 

One course selected from: 

SATH 101, 105, 106; SMUS 110; 

STHE 161 

Oue course from the following: 

SPHL 102, 121; SAMS 101, 102; 

SREL 103; or SEGL 250, 252, 275, 
279,280,283,289,290,291 

Foreign Language/Culture 3 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; or SSPN 102 

Placement in a 20 1 or higher level language course 
(Students placing into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but will have additional 
hours in electives, if hours are required in the major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101 or 102 



VIII. 



Social and Behavioral Sciences 

SG1S201 

SSOC 101 



Professional Education 



SEDF 210: Foundations of Education 3 



SEDF 333: Educational 3 

Development of the Life-long 

Learner 

SEDF 341: Education 3 

Procedures for Exceptional Children 

SEDF 485: Diversity, Management 

and Assessment 3 

SEDC 300: Resources and 3 

Technology in Teaching 

SEDE 410: Clinical 1 in Early 2 

Childhood Education 

SEDE 420: The Young Child: 3 

Behavior and Development in Early 

Childhood 

SEDE 422: Survey of 3 

Early Childhood Education 

SEDE 424: Parent Family Involvement 2 

in Early Childhood Education 

SEDE 440: Clinical 11 2 

in Early Childhood Education 

SEDE 445: Language Development 3 

and Communicative Skill 

SEDE 446: Math for the 3 

Young Child 

SEDE 447: Social Studies 3 

for the Young Child 

SEDE 448: Science for the 3 

Young Child 

SEDE 449: Creativity and Play 3 

SEDR 414: Emergent and 3 

Early Literacy 

SEDE 468 Education of the 3 

Young Child: An Ecological 

Approach 

SEDE 469: Directed Teaching 

in Early Childhood Education 



12 



Support Courses 

SMTH 232 and SMTH 233 6 

SEGL 484: Children's Literature 3 

Art history, SMUS 1 1 or STHE 1613 

SHED 221 3 

SPSYlOl 3 



Total Hours Required 



123 



136 



School of Education 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Bachelor of Arts in Education 

Major in Elementary Education 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Requirements 



Professional Education 



I. Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



III. 



IV. 



SSPH201 



Mathematics and Logic 

SMTH 121 and 231 



Information Teclinology 

SCSC 138 



Natural Sciences 

SBIO 110/L 

SPHS 

105, 1 



101/LorSCHM 101/L, 
06, 107/L, 109/L 



V. Arts and Humanities 6 

One course selected from: 

SATH 101, 105, 106; SMUS 110; 

STHE 161 

One course from the following: 

SPHL 102, 121; SAMS 101, 102; 

SREL 103; or SEGL 250, 252, 275, 
279,280.283,289,290,291 

VI. Foreign Language/Culture 3 

SFRN 102;SGRM 102;orSSPN 102 

Placement in a 20 1 or higher level language course 
(Students placing into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but will have additional 
hours in electives, if hours are required in the major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101 or 102 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 

SGIS201 

SSOC 101 orSPSY 101 



SEDF 210: Foundations of Education 3 

SEDF 333: Educational Development 3 

of the Life-long Learner 

SEDF 341: Education Procedures 3 

for Exceptional Children 

SHED 331: Health and Physical 3 

Education for the Elementary 

School Child 

SEDL 44 1 : Elementary School 3 

Curriculum and Organization 

SEDC 300: Resources and 3 

Technology in Teaching 

SEDF 483: Organization and 3 

Management of the Diverse Classroom 

SEDL 447: Teaching Social 3 

Studies in the Elementary 

and Middle School 

SEDL 450: Fine Arts 3 

in the Curriculum 

SEDL455: Clinical 1 in 2 

Elementaiy Education 

SEDR442: The Emergent Reader; 3 

Learning to Read and Write 

SEDF 487: Student, Teacher, 3 

and School Assessment 

SEDL 446: Teaching Math 3 

in the Elementary and Middle School 

SEDL 448: Teaching Science 3 

in the Elementary and Middle School 

SEDL 460: Clinical 11 in 2 

Elementary Education 

SEDR443: The Fluent Reader: 3 

Reading and Writing to Learn 

SEDR444: The Struggling Reader: 3 

Addressing Literacy Problems 

SEDL 468: Directed Teaching 15 

in the Elementary School 



Support Courses 

SMTH 232 and SMTH 233 6 

Geology or Astronomy 4 

SEGL 484: Children's Literature 3 

SATH 101, 105, 106; SMUS 110 3 

or STHE 161 



Total Hours Required 



124 



School of Education 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



137 



Bachelor of Arts in Education 

Major in Middle Grades Education 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Requirements 



I. Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



SSPH201 



Mathematics and Logic 6 

SMTH 120, 121, 122, 126. 127, 

141, 142 
SMTH 102';SPSY225;orSSOC201 



III. 



IV. 



Information Technology 

SCSC 138 or SIMS 



01 



Natural Sciences 8 

SBIO 110/L 

SAST 111/L; SCHM 101/L, 105, 106, 

107/L, 109/L; SGEL 101/L, 102/L, 
103/L; SPHS 101/L, 201/L, 202/L; 
211/L,212/L 

Arts and Humanities 6 

One course selected from: 

SATH 101,105, 106; SMUS 110, 140; 

orSTHE 161 

SPHL 102orSPHL211 



VI. Foreign Language/Culture 3 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; or SSPN 102 

Placement in a 20 1 or higher level language course 
(Students placing into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but will have additional 
hours in electives, if hours are required in the major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101 or 102 



VIII. 



Social and Behavioral Sciences 

SPSY 101 

SSOC 101 



SEDS 440: Clinical II in Middle 1 
Grades/Secondary Education 
SEDS 441: Middle School 4 

Curriculum and Methodology 
Middle School Methods #1* 3 

Middle School Methods #2* 3 

♦Select from SEDS 445 (language 
arts), SEDS 446 (mathematics), SEDS 
447 (social studies) and SEDS 448 
(science) to match Concentration Area 
# 1 and Concentration Area #2 
SEDS 450: Clinical 111 in Middle 1 



Grades/Secondary Education 
SEDS 480: Directed Teaching in 




Middle School 
Content Concentration^'^ 


15 
15 


Area#l 






3 




3 




3 




3 




3 


Content Concentration^'-^ 


15 


Area #2 






3 




3 




3 




3 




3 


Support Courses 

SHED 221: Lifelong 
Health and Wellness 

Elective 


3 
3 


Total Hours Required 123-124 



Professional Education 

SEDC 300: Resources and 3 

Technology in Teaching 
SEDF 210: Foundations 3 

of Education 
SEDF 333: Educational 3 

Development of the Lifelong Learner 
SEDF 341: Educational Procedures 3 

for Exceptional Learners 
SEDS 342: Clinical 1 in Middle I 

Grades/Secondary Education 

SEDR418: Literacy in the Middle 3 

and Secondary Schools 



'Math 102 required for sliiilents »illi malli concentration. 

-Courseworii ix determined in accordance with requirements 
available from student's academic advisor 

^For Social Studies concentration. SHST III and 112 are 
required. Course may not duplicate Vll History general education 
course. 



13B 



School of Education 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Bachelor of Arts or Science in Education 

Major in Secondary Education (Englisti) 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Requirements 



Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



SSPH201 



III. 



IV. 



Mattiemadcs and Logic 6-7 

SMTH 120, 121, 126, 127, 141, 142 

SMTH 102;SPSY225;orSSOC201 

Information Technology 3 

SCSC 138 or SIMS 101 

Natural Sciences 8 

SBIO 110/L 

SAST 1 1 1/L; SCHM 101/L, 105, 106, 

107/L, 109/L; SGEL 101/L, 102/L, 
103/L; SPHS 101/L, 201/L, 202/L, 
211/L,212/L 

Arts and Humanities 6 

SATH 101, 105, 106; SMUS 110, 140; 

orSTHE 161 

SPHL 102orSPHL211 



VI. Foreign Language/Culture 3 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; or SSPN 102 

Placement in a 20 1 or higher level language course 
(Students placing into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but will have additional 
hours in electives, if hours are required in the major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101 or 102 



VIII. Social and Beliavioral Sciences 

SPSY 101 

SSOC 101 



Professional Education 

SEDC 300; Resources and 

Technology in Teaching 

SEDF 210: Foundations of Education 

SEDF 333: Educational Development 

of the Lifelong Learner 
SEDF 341: Educational Procedures 

for Exceptional Learners 
SEDS 342: Clinical 1 in Middle 

Grades/Secondary Education 
SEDS 440: Clinical 11 in Middle 

Grades/Secondary Education 
SEDS 442: Secondary School 

Curriculum and Methodology 



SEDR 418: Literacy in the Middle 
and Secondary School 
SEDS 445: Teaching Middle and 
Secondary English/Language Arts 
SEDS 450: Clinical 111 in Middle 
Grades/Secondary Education 
SEDS 473: Directed Teaching 
in Secondary School English 



Content Concentration 

SEGL 275: Masterpieces 

of World Literature 

SEGL 291: African American 

Literature or other approved 
course in minority literature 

Genre or period elective 

(300 level or above) 



American Literature 
(300 level or above) 



British literature 
(300 level or above) 



SEGL 485: Adolescent Literature 
SEGL 490: Senior Seminar 



Electives 



15 



SEGL 295: Introduction to the 
Study of Literature 



SEGL 405: Shakespeare's Early 
Plays or SEGL 406: 
Shakespeare's Late Plays 
SEGL 451 : Introduction to the 
Study of Language, SEGL 455: 
Language Study Applications, 
or SEGL 252: English Grammar 
SEGL 453: Development of the 
English Language 
Writing course 
(200 level or above) 



6-8 



Total Hours Required 



129-131 



School of Education 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



139 



Bachelor of Arts in Education 

Major in Secondary Education (Spanish) 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Requirements 



I. Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



SSPH201 



II. Mathematics and Logic 6-7 

SMTH 120. 121, 126, 127, 141, 142 

SMTH 102; SPSY 225; or SSOC 201 



III. 



IV. 



Information Teclinology 

SCSC 138 or SIMS 



01 



Natural Sciences 8 

SBIOllO/L 

SAST111/L;SCHM 101/L, 105, 106, 

107/L, 109/L; SGEL 101/L, 102/L, 
103/L; SPHS 101/L, 201/L, 202/L, 
211/L,212/L 

Arts and Humanities 6 

SATH 101, 105, 106;SMUS 110, 140; 

orSTHE 161 
SPHL102orSPHL211 



VI 



Foreign Language/Culture 3 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; or SSPN 102 

Placement in a 20 1 or higher level language course 
(Students placing into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but will have additional 
hours in electives, if hours are required in the major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101 or 102 



VIII. 



Social and Behavioral Sciences 

SPSY 101 

SSOC 101 



Professional Education 

SEDC 300: Resources and 3 

Technology in Teaching 
SEDF 210: Foundations 3 

of Education 
SEDF 333: Educational 3 

Development of the Lifelong Learner 
SEDF 341: Educational Procedures 3 

for Exceptional Learners 
SEDS 342: Clinical 1 in Middle 1 

Grades/Secondary Education 
SEDS 440: Clinical 11 in Middle 1 

Grades/Secondary Education 
SEDS 442: Secondary School 4 

Curriculum and Methodology 



SEDR 418: Literacty in the Middle 3 
and Secondary Schools 
SEDS 449: Teaching Foreign 
Language in Secondary Schools 3 
SEDS 450: Clinical 111 in Middle 1 
Grades/Secondary Education 
SEDS 474: Directed Teaching in 
Secondary School Foreign Language 1 5 



Content Concentration 

SSPN 32 1 : Latin American 

Civilization 
SSPN 202: Intermediate 

Spanish or a Spanish literature 

course 

One or two courses selected 

from the following: 

SSPN 210: Spanish Oral 

Communication 

SSPN 310: Spanish Conversation 

SSPN 315: Spanish for Professions 

SSPN 250 or 350: Selected 

Studies Abroad 
SSPN 309: Spanish Grammar 

and Composition 
SSPN 301: Introduction to 

Spanish Lit 



3-6 



Two Spanish literature courses 



SSPN 320: Spanish Civilization 3 

SSPN 45 1 : Second Language 3 

Aquisition 

SSPN 453: Introduction 3 

to Romance Linguistics or 

SSPN 454: Introduction to 

Spanish Linguistics 

SSPN 490: Senior Seminar 3 



Support Courses 

SEGL 275: Masterpieces 3 

of World Literature 
SEGL 45 1 : Introduction to 3 

Linguistics 

Total Hours Required 1 23-1 27 



140 



School of Education 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Bachelor of Science in Education 

Major in Secondary Education (Biology) 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Requirements 



I. Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



III. 



IV. 



VI. 



SSPH 201 



Mathematics and Logic 6-7 

SMTH 126 

SMTH 102; SPSY 225; or SSOC 201 

Information Technology 3 

SCSC 138 or SIMS 101 

Natural Sciences 8 

SBIO 110/L 

SCHM 111/L 

Arts and Humanities 6 

SATH 101, 105, 106; SMUS 110, 140; 

orSTHE 161 

SPHL 102orSPHL211 



Foreign Language/Culture 

SFRN 102;SGRM 102;orSSPN 



02 



Placement in a 20 1 or higher level language course 
(Students placing into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but will have additional 
hours in electives, if hours are required in the major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101 or 102 



VIII. 



Social and Behavioral Sciences 

SPSY 101 

SSOC 101 



SEDS 442: Secondary School 

Curriculum and Methodology 

SEDR 418: Literacy in the Middle 

and Secondary School 

SEDS 448: Teaching Middle and 

Secondary Science 

SEDS 450: Clinical III in Middle 

Grades/Secondary Education 

SEDS 481 : Directed Teaching 



15 



in Secondary School Natural Science 

Content Concentration 

SBIO 102: Biological Science II 

SBIO 201 : Introduction to ^ 

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology 
SBIO 202: Introduction to ^ 

Cell & Molecular Biology 

SBIO 310: Invertebrate Zoology '■ 

SBIO 315: Comparative '■ 

Vertebrate Anatomy 
SBIO 320: Botany or 

SBIO 380: Plant Geography or 

SBIO 525: Plant Taxonomy 
SBIO 330: Microbiology 

SBIO 350: Genetics 



Support Courses 

SPHS 201: General Physics I 4 

SGEL 101: Physical Geology 4 

SCHM 112: General 4 

Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis 



Total Hours Required 



128-129 



Professional Education 

SEDC 300: Resources and 3 

Technology in Teaching 
SEDF 210: Foundations 3 

of Education 
SEDF 333: Educational 3 

Development of the Lifelong Learner 
SEDF 341: Educational Procedures 3 

for Exceptional Learners 
SEDS 342: Clinical I in Middle 1 

Grades/Secondary Education 
SEDS 440: Clinical II in Middle 1 

Grades/Secondary Education 



School of Education 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



141 



Bachelor of Science in Education 

Major in Secondary Education (Chemistry) 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Requirements 



Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



SSPH201 



II. Mathematics and Logic 7 

SMTH 142 

SMTH 102;SPSY225;orSSOC201 

III. Information Technology 3 

SCSC 138 or SIMS 101 

IV. Natural Sciences 8 

SBIO 101/LorSBlO 110/L 

SPHS201/L 

V. Arts and Humanities 6 

SATH 101, 105, 106; SMUS 110, 140; 

orSTHE 161 
SPHL102orSPHL211 

VI. Foreign Language/Culture 3 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; or SSPN 102 

Placement in a 20 1 or higher level language course 
(Students placing into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but will have additional 
hours in electives, if hours are required in the major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101 or 102 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 

SPSY 101 

SSOC 101 



Professional Education 

SEDC 300: Resources and 3 

Technology in Teaching 
SEDF 210: Foundations of 3 

Education 
SEDF 333: Educational 3 

Development of the Lifelong Learner 
SEDF 341: Educational Procedures 3 

for Exceptional Learners 
SEDS 342: Clinical 1 in Middle 1 

Grades/Secondary Education 
SEDS 440: Clinical 11 in Middle 1 

Grades/Secondary Education 

SEDS 442: Secondary School 4 

Curriculum and Methodology 



SEDR 418: Literacty in the Middle 

and Secondary Schools 
SEDS 448: Teaching Middle and 

Secondary Science 
SEDS 450: Clinical 111 in Middle 
Grades/Secondary Education 
SEDS 481 : Directed Teaching 



15 



in Secondary School Natural Science 
Content Concentration 

SCHM 111: General Chemistry 4 

SCHM 112: General Chemistry 4 

and Qualitative Analysis 
SCHM 321: Quantitative 3 

Analysis 
SCHM 32 1/L; Quantitative 1 

Analysis Lab 
SCHM 331: Organic 3 

Chemistry I 
SCHM 33 1/L: Organic 1 

Chemistry I Lab 
SCHM 332: Organic 3 

Chemistry II 
SCHM 332/L: Organic 1 

Chemistry II Lab 
SCHM 541: Physical 3 

Chemistry I 
SCHM 541/L: Physical 1 

Chemistry I Lab 

Chemistry 581: Biochemistry 3 

Chemistry 583/L: Biochemistry Lab 1 

Chemistry elective (499 or higher) 4 



Support Courses 

SPHS 202: General Physics II 

SGEL 101: Physical Geology, 

SGEL 102: Historical Geology, 

or SGEL 103: Environmental 

Earth Science 

SMTH 241: Calculus 111 



Total Hours Required 



128 



1A2 



School of Education 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Bachelor of Science in Education 

Major in Secondary Education (Mathematics) 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Requirements 



I. Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL102 



SSPH201 



II. 



III. 



rv. 



Mathematics and Logic 6 

SMTH 127 

SMTH 174 

Information Technology 3 

SCSC 138 or SIMS 101 

Natural Sciences 8 

SBIO 110/L 

SAST 111/L;SCHM 101/L 

105, 106, 107/L, 109/L; SGEL 101/L, 
102/L, 103/L: SPHS 101/L, 201/L, 
202/L,211/L. 212/L 

Arts and Humanities 6 

SATH 101, 105. 106;SMUS 110, 140; 

orSTHE 161 
SPHL102orSPHL211 



VI. Foreign Language/Culture 3 

SFRN 102;SGRM 102;orSSPN 102 

Placement in a 20 1 or higher level language course 
(Students placing into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but will have additional 
hours in electives, if hours are required in the major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101 or 102 



VIII. 



Social and Behavioral Sciences 

SPSY 101 

SSOC 101 



Professional Education 

SEDC 300: Resources and 3 

Technology in Teaching 
SEDF 210: Foundations 3 

of Education 
SEDF 333: Educational 3 

Development of the Lifelong Learner 
SEDF 341: Educational Procedures 3 

for Exceptional Learners 
SEDS 342: Clinical 1 in Middle 1 

Grades/Secondary Education 
SEDS 440: Clinical II in Middle 1 

Grades/Secondary Education 



SEDS 442: Secondary School 
Curriculum and Methodology 
SEDR418: Literacty in the Middle 
and Secondary Schools 
SEDS 446: Teaching Middle 
and Secondary Mathematics 
SEDS 450: Clinical III in Middle 
Grades/Secondary Education 
SEDS 478: Directed Teaching 
in Secondary School Mathematics 



Content Concentration 

SMTH 141: Calculus I 

SMTH 142: Calculus II 

SMTH 241 : Calculus III 

SMTH 189: Seminar in Strategies 

of Problem Solving 
SMTH 315: Statistical 

Methods or SMTH 512: 

Probability and Statistics 
SMTH 340: Mathematical 

Structures and Proof 

SMTH 53 1 : Geometry 

SMTH 344: 

Matrix Algebra 
SMTH 346: Introduction 

to Modem Algebra 
SMTH 501: History 

of Mathematics 

SMTH 599: Senior Seminar 



Support Course 

SEGL 275: Masterpieces 

of World Literature 

Electives 



Total Hours Required 



15 



124 



Schoo\ of Education 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



143 



Bachelor of Arts or Science in Education 

Major in Secondary Education (Social Studies/History) 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Requirements 



Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



SSPH 201 



in. 



IV. 



V. 



VI. 



Mathematics and Logic 6 

SMTH 120, 121, 122 or 127 

SMTH 102;SPSY225orSSOC201 

Information Teclinology 3 

SCSC 138 or SIMS 101 

Natural Sciences 8 

SBIO 110/L 

SAST111/L;SCHM 101/L 

105, 106, 107/L, 109/L; SGEL 101/L, 
102/L, 103/L; SPHS 101/L, 201/L, 
202/L,211/L,212/L 

Arts and Humanities 6 

SATH 101, 105, 106;SMUS 110, 140; 

orSTHE 161 
SPHL102orSPHL211 



Foreign Language/Culture 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; or SSPN 



102 



Placement in a 20 1 or higher level language course 
(Students placing into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement jjut will have additional 
hours in electives, if hours are required in the major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 

SPSYlOl 

SSOC 101 



Professional Education 

SEDC 300: Resources and 3 

Technology in Teaching 
SEDF 210: Foundations 3 

of Education 
SEDF 333: Educational 3 

Development of the Lifelong Learner 
SEDF 341: Educational Procedures 3 

for Exceptional Learners 
SEDS 342: Clinical 1 in Middle 1 

Grades/Secondary Education 
SEDS 440: Clinical II in Middle 1 

Grades/Secondary Education 



SEDS 442: Secondary School 4 

Curriculum and Methodology 

SEDR418: Literacty in the Middle 3 

and Secondary Schools 

SEDS 447: Teaching Middle 3 

and Secondary Social Studies 

SEDS 450: Clinical III in Middle 1 

Grades/Secondary Education 

SEDS 475: Directed Teaching 15 

in Secondary School Social Studies 



Content Concentration 

SHST 102: World History II 



SHST 360 or 36 1 : History of Africa 3 

SHST 370: History of China or 3 

SHST 372: History of India or 
or SHST 371: History of Japan 
American history, pre- 1865 3 

(300 level or above) 

SHST 105: American History I 3 

SHST 106: American History II 3 

European History (300-level or 3 

above) 

Geography 103: Introduction 3-4 

to Geography or Geography 121: 
Principles of Regional Geography 

Economics 22 1 : Principles 3 

of Macroeconomics or Economics 
222: Principles of Microeconomics 



SSOC 329 
SSOC 330 
SSOC 333 



Social Change; 3 

Social Inequality; 

Race and Ethnic Relations 



or SSOC 335: Sociology of Women 

SGIS20I 3 

Psychology or Sociology elective 3 

History 500: Senior Seminar 3 



Support Course 

SEGL 275: Masterpieces 

of World Literature 



Total Hours Required 



126-127 



144 



School of Education 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Bachelor of Science in Education 

Major in Physical Education 

Physical Education Teacher Education 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Requirements 



Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



SSPH 201 



III. 



IV. 



Mathematics and Logic 

SMTH 120 

SMTH 102 

Information Technology 

SCSC 138 



Natural Sciences 8 

SBIO 110/L 

SAST 111/L; SBIO 206, 240, 242/L, 

270; SCHM 1 1 /L 1 05, 1 06, 1 07/L. 1 09/L, 1 1 1 /L, 1 1 2/L; 
SGEG 201; SGEL 101/L, 102/L, 103/L, 120, 121, 123/L, 
131; SPHS 101/L, 201/L, 202/L, 211/L, 212/L 

V. Arts and Humanities 6 

One course selected from: 

SAAS204;SATH 101, 105, 106; 

SMUS 110, 140;STHE 161, 170 
One course from the following (no more than 
3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 101, 

105, 106; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 283, 289, 290, 
291; SMUS 110, 140; SPHL 102, 211; SREL 103, STHE 
161, 170 

VI. Foreign Language/Culture 3 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; or SSPN 102 

Placement in a 20 1 or higher level language course 
(Students placing into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but will have additional 
hours in electives, if hours are required in the major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101, 102, 105, or 106 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

SPSY 101 

One course from the following: 

SAAS 201; SANT 102; SECO 221, 
222; SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201, 301, 
320;SSOC 101;SWST 101 



Professional Education 

SEDC 300: Resources and 3 

Technology in Teaching 

SEDF 210: Foundations of Education 3 

SEDF 333: Educational 

Development of the Lifelong 

Learner or Psychology 302: 

Developmental Psychology 3 
SPED 460: Issues and Trends in 3 

Physical Education 
SPED 312: Teaching of Physical 4 

Education 
SEDR418: Reading in Secondary 3 

Schools 
SPED 405: Teaching Elementary 4 

Physical Education 
SPED 462: Physical Education 3 

for the Exceptional Child or 

SEDF 341 : Education Procedures for 

Exceptional Children 
SPED 479: Directed Teaching 12 

in Physical Education 



Content Concentration 

SHED 170: First Aid 

SHED 221: Lifelong Health 

and Wellness 
SHED 334: The School 

Health Program 

SPED 180: Swimming 

SPED 200: Foundations of Physical 

Education 

SPED 235: Dance and Gymnastics 

SPED 301: Exercise Physiology 

SPED 302: Biomechanics 

SPED 304: Motor Learning 

SPED 320: Team Sports I 

SPED 415: Individual Sports 

SPED 420: Team Sports II 

SPED 445: Measurement and 

Evaluation 
SPED 453: Organization and 



Administration of Physical Education 



Support Course 

SBIO 232: Human Anatomy 



Total Hours Required 



127 



School of Education 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



145 



Bachelor of Science in Education 

Major in Physical Education: Fitness-Recreation Concentration 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Requirements 



Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



SSPH201 



II. 



III. 



rv. 



Mathematics and Logic 

SMTH 120 

SMTH 102 

Information Technology 

SCSC 138 



8 



Natural Sciences 

SBIO 110/L 

SAST 111/L; SBIO 206, 240, 242/L, 

270;SCHM 101/L 105, 106, 107/L, 109/L, 111/L, 11 2/L; 
SGEG201;SGEL101/L, 102/L, 103/L, 120, 121, 123/L, 
131; SPHS 101/L, 201/L, 202/L, 211/L, 212/L 



SPED 235: 
SPED 265: 
SPED 301: 
SPED 302: 
SPED 320: 
SPED 390: 
SPED 415: 
SPED 445: 

SPED 455: 

SREC 200 
SREC201 
SREC 301 
SREC 401 
SREC 462 
SREC 480 
SREC 485 



Dance and Gymnastics 
Officiating of Sports 
Exercise Physiology 
Biomechanics 
Team Sports I 
Field Experience 
Individual Sports 
Measurement and Evaluation 
of Physical Education 
Fitness Assessment and 
Prescription 

: Introduction to Recreation 
: Programming in Recreation 
: Administration of Recreation 
: Lifetime Leisure 
: Special Populations 

Internship 

Senior Seminar 



V. Arts and Humanities 6 

One course selected from: 

SAAS204;SATH 101, 105, 106; 

SMUS 110, 140;STHE 161, 170 
One course from the following (no more than 
3 credit hours from a specific discipline) 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 101, 

105, 106; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 283, 289, 290, 
291; SMUS 1 10, 140; SPHL 102, 21 1; SREL 103. STHE 
161, 170 

VI. Foreign Language/Culture 3 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; or SSPN 102 

Placement in a 20 1 or higher level language course 
(Students placing into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but will have additional 
hours in electives, if hours are required in the major). 



VII. History 



SHST 101, 102, 105, or 106 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

SPSYlOl 

One course from the following: 

SAAS 201; SANT 102; SECO 221, 
222; SGEG 101, 103; SGIS 201, 301, 
320;SSOC lOLSWST 101 



Major Requirements 

"sped 120: Conditioning 
"sped 128: Aerobics 

SPED 140: Adult Recreation Sports 

SPED 180: Swimming or 

SPED 280: Swimming and Water Safety 



_ Related Concentration Courses 9 

Six semester hours must be from 

one academic area and three semester 

hours from a ditTerent academic area. 
Academic Area 1 

SPSY 325: Experimental Psychology or 

higher 
Academic Area 2 

Financial Accounting 225, 

Managerial Accounting 226, 
Business Systems 290, or any 
upper division business course 
with consent of instructor 
Academic Area 3 

Science: Any upper division biology 

course or any chemistry, geology, or 
physics course 
Academic Area 4 
Sociology: any upper division course 

_ Supporting Courses 

SHED 170: First Aid 3 

SHED 22 1 : Lifelong Health 3 

and Wellness 

SNUR 301: Nutrition 3 

SPED 270: Introduction 

to Athletic Training 3 
SPSY 302: Developmental Psychology 3 



Electives 



Total Hours Required 



125 



146 



School of Education 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Bachelor of Science in Special Education 

Major in Learning Disabilities 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Requirements 



Communication 

SEGL 101 andSEGL 102 



SSPH201 



III. 



IV. 



Mathematics and Logic 

SMTH 121 

SMTH 231 

Information Teclinology 

SCSC 138 

Natural Sciences 

SBIO 110/L 

SPHS 101/L; SCHM 101/L, 105, 106, 

107/L, 109/L 



V. Arts and Humanities 6 

SATH 101. 105, 106;SMUS 110;or 

STHE 161 

SPHL102, 211; SAMS 101, 102; SREL 

103; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 283, 289, 290, 291 

VI. Foreign Language/Culture 3 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; or SSPN 102 

Placement in a 20 1 or higher level language course 
(Students placing into 201 or higher level of a language 
have satisfied this requirement but will have additional 
hours in electives, if hours are required in the major). 



SEDC 300: Resources and 3 

Technology in Teaching 

SEED 414: Individualized 3 

Curriculum Students with Disabilities 

SEED 415: Reading Disorders and 3 

Reading Methods 

SEDR442: Emergent Reader 3 

SEDR443: Fluent Reader 3 

SEED 440: Practicum in the 3 

Instruction of Students with Disabilities 

SEED 445: Language Disorders and 3 

Language Arts Methods 

SEED 446: Math Disabilities 3 

and Math Methods 

SEED 449: Issues and Trends 3 

in Exceptionalities 

SEED 483 : Assessment of Students 3 

with Disabilities 

SEDF483: Organization and 3 

Management of the Diverse Classroom 

SEED 470: Directed Teaching 1 2 

of Learners with Learning Disabilities 



Concentration 9 

SPSY302: Developmental Psychology 



The remaining 6 hours must be from the follow- 
ing courses: SPSY 303; SPSY 304; SPSY 305; 
SPSY 307; SPSY 310; SPSY 351 



VII. History 



SHST 101 or 102 



VIII. 



Social and Betiavioral Sciences 

SPSY 101 

SGIS 201 



Professional Education 

SEDF 210: Foundations of 3 

Education 
SEDF 341: Educational 3 

Procedures for Exceptional Learners 
SEED 410: Methods of Teaching 3 

Students with LD 
SEED 412: Characteristics of 3 

Students with LD 



Supporting Courses 

SEGL 484: Children's Literature 3 

or SEGL 485: Adolescent Literature 
SMTH 232: Basic Concepts of 3 

Elementary Mathematics II 
SMTH 233: Geometry and 3 

Measurement 
One additional arts and humanities 3 

course not repeating the discipline 

selected from the general education 
requirement: 

SATH 101. 105.or 106;SMUS 110; 

STHE 161 



Total Hours Required 



122 



School of Education 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



147 



148 School of Education 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 




Mary Black School of Nursing 



Bachelor of Science in Professional Nursing 



History 

The Mar>' Black School of Nursing is named in honor 
of Mrs. Mary Black Phillips and the late Miss Rosa Black 
in appreciation for the generosity of the Black Family for 
their role in securing flinds for the building that houses the 
School of Nursing. The School began offering the Associ- 
ate Degree in Technical Nursing in 1967 with the begin- 
ning of the University. This program closed in 2005. The 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing program began in 1977 as 
an upper division program for registered nurses. In 1986, 
the first generic four year track began. 

In 2003 the University of South Carolina Upstate opened 
an additional campus for the University in Greenville, 
South Carolina at the University Center (UCG). Class- 
rooms, computer laboratories, a learning resource center 
and faculty offices support the undergraduate program at 
the Greenville site. 

Mission 

The primary mission of the Mary Black School of Nurs- 
ing as part of the University of South Carolina Upstate, is to 
serve the citizens of the Upstate South Carolina by provid- 
ing educational programs in nursing that are of the highest 
quality. A variety of teaching modalities are used for stu- 
dents who are diverse in background, age, race, ethnicity, 
gender, educational experiences and needs. Programs are 
founded upon strong inter-institutional articulation agree- 
ments as well as partnerships with the community, includ- 
ing health care organizations and health care providers in 
Upstate South Carolina and surrounding regions. 

The faculty of the Mary Black School of Nursing are com- 
mitted to excellence in teaching, advising and in providing 
experiential learning opportunities that empower students 
to become competent professionals who give high quality 
nursing care to diverse populations. The faculty provide 
leadership in addressing nursing educational needs and in 
promoting the health and welfare of the citizens of Upstate 
South Carolina through educational outreach, scholarship 
and professional service. 

Philosophy 

Baccalaureate nursing education at the Mary Black 
School of Nursing prepares individuals for professional 
nursing practice to serve the people of Upstate South Caro- 
lina and beyond. The Baccalaureate Nursing Program's phi- 
losophy reflects the vision, mission and goals of the Univer- 
sity of South Carolina Upstate and the Mary Black School 
of Nursing. This philosophy includes the faculty's beliefs 
about human beings, the environment, health, nursing, bac- 
calaureate nursing education, the teaching-learning process, 
and characteristics of the professional nurse. 

The faculty believe that human beings (individuals, fami- 
lies, groups, aggregates, and communities) are complex, 
interrelated, and interdependent open systems composed of 
multiple subsystems. Humans are integral with and cannot 
be separated from their environment. They continuously 
receive and process inputs from their environment and 
provide outputs to that environment. Outputs are the result 
of the transformation of inputs and are influenced by a hu- 
man's biological, cognitive, psychological, social, cultural. 



and spiritual subsystems. Human beings strive to achieve 
higher levels of functioning and complexity through de- 
velopmental processes. Human beings are greater than and 
different from the sum of their parts. This holistic view of 
human beings focuses on the dynamic interaction, pattern, 
organization, and relationship of subsystems and supra-sys- 
tems. 

The faculty believe that environmental concerns are 
global in nature. The environment includes but is not lim- 
ited to the political, social, economic, technologic, genetic, 
and ecological systems that influence or are influenced by 
human beings. The environment is the context in which 
nursing occurs. 

The faculty believe that health is a dynamic process con- 
stantly changing and existing on a continuum of wellness 
to illness from birth to end-of-life. The mutual interaction 
of biological, cognitive, psychological, social, cultural, and 
spiritual subsystems results in health. Culturally based be- 
liefs, values and lifestyles, natural and social environments, 
genetic background, and developmental level all affect the 
client's experience and definition of health. Optimal well- 
ness is achieved through self-care behaviors, partnerships 
with families and communities, and interventions with 
health care providers. 

The faculty believe that nursing, a subsystem of the 
health care delivery system, is an open system. The scope 
of professional nursing practice includes health promotion, 
maintenance, restoration, rehabilitation, as well as the pre- 
vention and detection of health alterations. Caring is inte- 
gral to professional nursing practice and extends to self and 
others in the provision of humanistic health care. Profes- 
sional nursing practice is both a caring art and an applied 
science based upon synthesis of knowledge from nursing 
and the liberal arts and sciences. Through partnerships, 
nursing creates a sociopolitical force that promotes and en- 
hances health and health care. 

The faculty believe that teaching-learning occurs from 
interactions and transactions between and among students, 
faculty, and clients. Learners are diverse in their biologi- 
cal, cognitive, psychological, social, cultural, and spiritual 
characteristics. Learning is a continuous process facilitated 
by self-assessment, technology, and a variety of teaching 
methods that accommodate diverse learning styles and in- 
dividual learning needs. 

The faculty believe that baccalaureate nursing education 
is broad-based and consists of professional nursing, liberal 
arts, and science courses. The baccalaureate program pre- 
pares the student to synthesize, think critically, and make 
clinical judgments within ethical, moral, and legal frame- 
works. The program provides opportunities for students to 
assume responsibility for the total scope of nursing prac- 
tice for diverse individuals, families, groups, aggregates, 
and community clients in structured and unstructured set- 
tings. Students learn to function in a variety of roles such 
as; providers of care, consumers of research, collaborators, 
advocates, educators, leaders, and managers. The goal of 
baccalaureate nursing education is to prepare innovative 
leaders in nursing practice. It prepares students to integrate 



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Mary Black School of Nursing 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



cutting-edge knowledge such as genetics, environmental 
health, and community-focused health care. Baccalaureate 
nursing education prepares students to access, critique, and 
examine research for its implications and utilization in evi- 
dence-based nursing practice and provides the foundation 
for graduate education in nursing. 

The faculty believe that the baccalaureate graduate syn- 
thesizes and applies broad knowledge from the liberal arts, 
sciences, and nursing to provide theoretical and evidence 
-based nursing care. Drawing upon cognitive, affective, and 
psychomotor domains of learning, the professional nurse 
uses critical thinking strategies to provide holistic care to 
diverse clients with simple and/or complex health needs. 
The professional nurse is accountable for nursing care and 
acts in independent, interdependent, and dependent roles 
to provide and coordinate health care. The use of complex 
communication skills by the baccalaureate graduate facili- 
tates interpersonal relationships and enhances therapeutic 
nursing interventions to effect change. Through life-long 
learning, the professional nurse incorporates new knowl- 
edge and technologies to improve care and advance nurs- 
ing practice. The baccalaureate graduate, as a leader and 
responsible citizen, creates the social, economic, and politi- 
cal systems that impact global health. 

Undergraduate Program Objectives 

At the completion of the program, the graduate will be: 

1 . A critical thinker who uses clinical nursing judgement 
and ethical decision making to design/manage/coordinate 
nursing care based on evidence and current research, a 
broad knowledge base and standards of nursing practice. 

2. An effective communicator who uses various modali- 
ties to provide caring, competent and holistic nursing care 
to diverse populations across the lifespan. 

3. A competent provider of nursing care who delivers 
safe, holistic, therapeutic nursing interventions with indi- 
viduals, families and communities in a variety of settings. 

4. A professional role model who assumes responsibility 
and accountability for personal and professional behaviors, 
ethical practice and client advocacy. 

Accreditation 

The School of Nursing is accredited by the Commission 
on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) and is also ap- 
proved by the South Carolina Board of Nursing. Inquiries 
can be made to the CCNE at; 

Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education 

1 Dupont Circle Northwest, Suite 530 

Washington, D.C. 20036 

1-202-463-6903 

Inquiries may also be made to the South Carolina Board 
of Nursing at: 

POBox 12367 

Columbia, South Carolina 2921 1-2367 

803-896-4550 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
Program (BSN) 

This professional program prepares graduates to assume 
entry-level positions in a variety of health care settings. The 
program is divided into two components, entry as a pre- 



nursing major focused on meeting course pre-requisites and 
entry as a nursing major focused on the clinical and didactic 
portions of the nursing curriculum. Required pre-nursing 
courses provide a broad background in general education 
and form the foundation for the professional nursing com- 
ponent of the program. Courses taken in the last two years 
of the program provide the theoretical and practical basis 
for nursing practice in an increasingly complex health care 
system. In addition to focusing on the essentials of nursing 
in the hospital, the curriculum also emphasizes community 
based and primary care. Opportunities to provide care to 
diverse clients are provided. Use of technology is integrat- 
ed through out the program. The program prepares gradu- 
ates for professional positions immediately after graduation 
and provides a firm foundation for graduate study. Students 
who earn the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree are eli- 
gible to sit for the National Council Licensure Examination 
for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). 

Bachelor 's Degree for Registered Nurses 
(RNtoBSN) 

Registered nurses who have previously earned diplomas 
or associate degrees in nursing are admitted to the under- 
graduate program to meet requirements for the Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing degree. Students are able to complete 
all degree requirements on a ftill time basis in one calendar 
year of study. 

The School awards 35 semester hours of validated nurs- 
ing credit to each registered nurse for past nursing courses. 

Distance Learning 

The mission of the School is to provide excellence in 
teaching and as such is dedicated to providing unique op- 
portunities and creative flexible programs for students, fac- 
ulty and the community. Distance learning and the use of 
other new educational technologies are part of the future in 
the continuing mission. The School offers the RN to BSN 
program in three modalities, traditional classroom, web and 
educational television. For further information and class 
offerings, please contact the School of Nursing Office of 
Student Support Services (864) 503-5441. 

Facilities 

The School of Nursing utilizes the facilities and resourc- 
es of the entire university, the community and health care 
agencies. The School of Nursing has two campuses that 
offer the undergraduate program in nursing, one at the main 
campus at the University of South Carolina Upstate (USC 
Upstate) and one on the Greenville campus at the University 
Center at Greenville (UCG). The UCG campus is equipped 
with state of the art classrooms, computer labs in addition 
to a separate Learning Resource Center. 

The School on the main campus is located in the new 
Health Education Complex housing state-of-the-art edu- 
cational technology. The Learning Resource Centers assist 
students to learn in multiple modalities, including human 
patient simulators. 

The School of Nursing offers a diversity of clinical 
sites for student experiences. The Mary Black Hospital, 
Spartanburg Regional Hospital Center, Greenville Hospi- 
tal University Medical Center, and Bon Secours St Francis 
Hospital are some of the primary sites used for clinical ex- 



Mary Black School of Nursing 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



151 



periences. The School has contracts with over 60 additional 
health care agencies in the upstate supporting the variety of 
clinical learning experiences for all students. 

Transportation 

Clinical learning experiences are varied in settings and 
are located in both Spartanburg and Greenville and sur- 
rounding counties. Students are expected to travel to and 
from all clinical experiences. Students are responsible for 
providing their own transportation and carrying appropri- 
ate insurance. The School of Nursing is not liable for any 
traffic violations or auto mishaps during the students' com- 
mute. 

Responsibilities to Clinical Agencies 

Students are responsible for complying with policies and 
procedures required by clinical agencies. Failure to meet 
these requirements may lead to exclusion from required 
clinical educational experiences and prevent progression in 
the program. 

Computer Literacy 

The School of Nursing acknowledges that health care 
delivery systems are evolving at an accelerated rate and be- 
coming increasingly reliant on computer technology. Com- 
puter literacy is rapidly becoming a basic communication 
skill. Prior to enrolling in nursing courses, it is suggested 
that students familiarize themselves with basic computer 
skills. Students should be able to use a computer to log onto 
their email account to communicate with other students and 
faculty. They should be able to log on to the Internet to 
access class content. Ability to use a word processing pro- 
gram and perform Internet searches for health care related 
materials are also suggested skills. 

Advising and Assistance 

The focus of advising in the School of Nursing is to assist 
students to successfully progress toward their educational 
objectives. TTie baccalaureate degree program is divided 
into two components; the lower division and the upper di- 
vision. All lower division students will be advised by per- 
sonnel in the Office of Nursing Student Support Services. 
All upper division student are advised by Nursing faculty. 
It is very important that you meet with your assigned advi- 
sor each semester. Your advisor will speak with you about 
your academic plan of study as well as fiiture employment 
and educational goals. 

Admission Policies 
Admission as a Freshman 

Entering USC Upstate freshman interested in nursing as a 
career must meet general entrance requirements of the uni- 
versity. Each student declaring nursing as a major are noted 
as "pre-nursing students" and are advised in the Office of 
Nursing Student Support Services. Students enrolled in the 
lower division of the school should meet with an advisor in 
plarming an appropriate program of study. The program of 
smdy will ensure that each student registers for the correct 
prerequisite courses for the upper division courses. Stu- 
dents must meet with a nursing advisor each semester prior 
to registration. Students must complete all prerequisites 
prior to enrolling in the upper division of nursing. For in- 
formation or assistance, call the School of Nursing (864) 
503-5441. 



Admission into the nursing major is competitive. A sepa- 
rate application for the final two years of the nursing major 
must be submitted by published dates on the forms provided 
by the School of Nursing. The School admits applicants for 
the non-licensed portion of the upper division twice a year 
for each campus for the fall and spring semesters. Each 
semester's junior class is selected from all applicants who 
meet all the minimum requirements. For registered nurse 
students, applicants are selected for the fall semester only. 

Admission to the Upper Division 

The final two years of the nursing curriculum are com- 
posed of professional nursing courses. In order to be con- 
sidered for admission to the professional nursing major, 
students enrolled at USC Upstate must complete a separate 
application form which is available through the School of 
Nursing. Transfer students must first apply to USC Upstate 
through the Office of Admissions and then complete a sepa- 
rate application available through the School of Nursing. 

A faculty committee reviews all applications and admits 
students to the program based on the stated requirements. 
Admission is competitive and is based on the applicant's 
cumulative grade point average (GPA) for the pre-requisite 
courses as well as available space in the admitted class. 

Applications for admission for non-licensed students 
must be submitted by published dates for fall semester ad- 
missions and applications for spring semester admissions 
must be submitted to the School of Nursing by published 
dates. Students typically apply for admission into the upper 
division during the first semester of their sophomore year 

Applications for admissions for the registered nurse pro- 
gram (RN to BSN) must apply by published dates prior to 
the fall semester in which they will plan to begin the pro- 
gram. 

Admission of Students 

Application for admission to the upper division for non- 
registered nurses is competitive. Each semester's class is 
selected from applicants who meet the minimum require- 
ments; 

a) Admitted to the University of South Carolina Upstate. 

b) Completion of all pre-requisite course (lower division 
general education studies) with a grade of C or better. 

c) Minimum GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale. 

d) Only one nursing course or required science course 
(SBIO 232, 242, 330, and SCHM 109) may be repeated to 
earn a grade of C or better. If courses are repeated, both 
grades will be included in the calculation of the GPA. 

Students with a cumulative GPA of less than 2.5 but 
meeting all other admission requirements MAY be consid- 
ered for possible admission to the program. If admitted, the 
student will be placed on probationary status and must suc- 
cessfully complete the semester with a "C" or better in all 
attempted coursework. Failure to achieve a minimum of a 
C in all courses will result in removal from the program. 

Admission of Registered Nurse Students 

Application for admission to the upper division for reg- 
istered nurse students is selective. Each year's class is se- 
lected from students who meet the minimum requirements: 

a) Minimum grade of C on all required prerequisite 
courses. 

b) Completion of all lower division course requirements 
as listed on the Bachelor of Science Nursing Curriculum 
RN Track Student Worksheet. 

c) Graduation from an associate degree or diploma pro- 
gram in nursing. 



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Mary Black School of Nursing 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



d) Hold an unencumbered license. Clinical experiences 
in states other than South Carolina require an active license 
in that state. 

Enrollment and Progression Policies 
Southern Council on Collegiate Education for 
Nursing (SCCEN) Core Performance Standards 

The Mary Black School of Nursing requires all applicants 
and continuing students to meet core performance standards 
as defined by the Southern Council on Collegiate Education 
for Nursing (SCCEN). These core performance standards 
are defined as follows: 

Standard 1 : Critical Thinking and Related Mental Abili- 
ties: Must have critical thinking ability sufficient for clini- 
cal judgment. E.\amples of necessary functional abilities 
associated with this standard include (not an all inclusive 
list): ability to interpret, investigate, communicate, and 
comprehend complex situations; identify cause and efTect 
relative to clinical situations; ability to make decisions and 
assess situations under varying degrees of stress; ability to 
read and comprehend detailed charts, reports, journal ar- 
ticles, books, etc; and capable of performing all arithmetic 
functions (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, 
ratios and simple algebraic equations). 

Standard 2: Communication and Interpersonal Abilities: 
Must be able to read, write, speak and comprehend English 
with sufficient skill to communicate effectively verbally 
and non — verbally; must have interpersonal abilities suffi- 
cient to interact with individuals, families and groups from 
a variety of social, emotional, cultural and intellectual back- 
grounds. Examples of necessary functional abilities associ- 
ated with this standard include (not all inclusive): ability 
to establish rapport with clients and their families, peers, 
agency personnel and faculty, explain treatment procedures; 
initiate health teaching, and document and interpret nursing 
actions and client responses. 

Standards: Physical activities. Must have physical abil- 
ities sufficient to move from room to room and maneuver 
in small spaces with gross and fine motor abilities sufficient 
to provide safe and effective nursing care. Examples of 
necessary functional abilities associated with this standard 
include (not all inclusive): move around a client's room, 
work spaces, treatment areas and administer CPR; calibrate 
and use equipment; position and transfer clients; capable of 
lifting up to 50 pounds independently; pushing up to 200 
pounds independently; reaching 1 8 inches above head with- 
out the use of mechanical devises to elevate themselves; 
capable of sitting, standing, walking for extended periods 
of time; experience no limitation when bending, stooping, 
sitting, standing, walking (i.e. uses no mechanical devices 
to assist themselves which would impede the safety of a 
client); ability to move to and respond to an emergency situ- 
ation in a timely manner and able to document in a clear, 
legible manner. 

Standard 4: Hearing: Must have auditory ability suf- 
ficient to monitor and assess health needs. Examples of 
necessary functional abilities associated with this standard 
include (not all inclusive) ability to hear auscultory sounds, 
monitor alarms and emergency signals; ability to hear soft 
whispers of clients and families and able to tolerate loud 
noise for extended periods of time. Assistive devices must 
correct hearing to this degree and be worn at all times dur- 
ing clinical experiences. 

Standards: Visual: Must have the visual ability sufficient 
for observation, assessment and intervention necessary for 



nursing care. Examples of necessary functional abilities in- 
clude (not all inclusive): observe client responses; accurate- 
ly read equipment, gauges and monitors; vision correctable 
to 20/40, nornial depth perception and ability to distinguish 
colors; ability to tolerate offensive visual situations. 

Standard 6: Smell: Must have smelling ability to monitor 
and assess health needs. Examples of necessary functional 
abilities include (not all inclusive); ability to differentiate 
between various types of smells and odors and ability to 
tolerate offensive odors. 

Please note that students will be accommodated in accord 
with the American with Disabilities Act. 

Criminal Background Checks 

Clinical agencies are requiring all students to have a crim- 
inal background check (CBC). This CBC must be submit- 
ted with the application for the upper division of the nursing 
program. The CBC must be conducted within thirty days 
of the due date for applications. The federal and state CBC 
policy for USC Upstate Mary Black School of Nursing has 
been developed based on DHEC Procedures for Conducting 
State and Federal Criminal Background Checks for Direct 
Caregivers. If a student has been found guilty or has plead 
no contest to substance abuse, child or adult abuse, sexual as- 
sault, assault with a deadly weapon, neglect or mistreatment 
of residents/patients/clients or misappropriation of resident/ 
patient/clients property, the facility cannot permit that stu- 
dent to work as a direct caregiver. The criminal background 
checks are done for a seven year retrospective screen. The 
student assumes the cost of these requirements. 

Drug Screens 

Clinical agencies require students to submit to a drug 
screen prior to caring for patients. For obvious health and 
safety concerns, nurses must conduct health care and educa- 
tional activities fully in control of their manual dexterity and 
skills, mental faculties, and judgment. The presence or use 
of drugs or alcohol, lawful or otherwise, which interferes 
or impairs the judgment or motor coordination of nursing 
students in a health care setting poses an unacceptable risk 
for patients, colleagues, the University, and affiliating clini- 
cal agencies. Preventing and/or detecting substance abuse, 
as defined below, is particularly critical in the Mary Black 
School of Nursing's Upper Division of the BSN program, 
where students spend a considerable amount of time learn- 
ing patient care in a variety of clinical settings. The Mary 
Black School of Nursing recognizes its responsibility to en- 
deavor to provide a safe, efficient acadeinic environment 
for students and to cooperate with clinical agencies in pro- 
viding for the safe and effective care of their patients during 
nursing students" clinical experiences in their facilities. 
Therefore, the following policy has been adopted to: 

a. Proscribe substance abuse and/or activities or behav- 
iors a) that are prohibited by the University's Drug-Free 
Policy, or b) which may subject the involved student, other 
individuals, and the University to legal penalties or conse- 
quences, or c) which may cause a deterioration of the atmo- 
sphere and circumstances under which the care of patients 
and the nursing educational programs are conducted; 

b. Identify students in the upper division of the BSN pro- 
gram who may have a drug or alcohol-related impairment or 
conviction that may impact their ability to learn safe nurs- 
ing care practices or that may create unacceptable risks for 
the University or clinical agencies in which students have 
clinical experiences; 



Mary Black School of Nursing 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



153 



c. Cooperate with affiliating clinical agencies by requir- 
ing nursing students reporting to such agencies to consent 
voluntarily a) to allow those agencies to drug test the stu- 
dent in accordance with their policies, and b) to disclose 
any drug testing results to appropriate Mary Black School 
of Nursing officials. 

Drug testing means the scientific analysis of urine, blood, 
breath, saliva, hair, tissue, and other specimens of the hu- 
man body for the purpose of detecting a drug or alcohol. 

Illegal drug means any drug which is not legally obtain- 
able; any drug which is legally obtainable but has not been 
legally obtained; any prescribed drug not legally obtained; 
any prescribed drug not being used for the prescribed pur- 
pose or by the person for whom it was prescribed; any over- 
the-counter drug being used at a dosage level other than that 
recommended by the manufacturer, or being used for a pur- 
pose other than the purpose intended by the manufacturer; 
and any drug being used for a purpose or by a person not 
in accordance with bona fide medical therapy. Examples 
of illegal drugs include, but are not limited to, stitnulants, 
depressants, narcotic or hallucinogenic drugs, cannabis 
substances, such as marijuana and hashish, cocaine, heroin, 
methamphetamine, phencyclidine (PCP), and so-called de- 
signer drugs and look-alike drugs. 

Impaired means that a person's mental or physical ca- 
pabilities are reduced below their normal levels (with or 
without any reasonable accommodation for a disability). 
An impaired student manifests deterioration in the level of 
function as compared to that previously observed, or the 
student does not function at a level normally expected under 
the prevailing circumstances. Impairment may exist in one 
or more multiple domains, including psychomotor activity 
and skills, conceptual or factual recall, integrative or syn- 
thetic thought processes, judgment, attentiveness, demean- 
or and attitudes as manifested in speech or actions. Impair- 
ment will include addiction to and/or physical dependence 
upon chemical substances. 

Substance abuse means (a) the manufacture, use, sale, 
purchase, distribution, transfer, or possession of an illegal 
drug by any nursing student while on University or affili- 
ated clinical site premises or while participating in any Uni- 
versity or affiliated clinical site-sponsored or related activ- 
ity, including any nursing-related course or clinical training 
activity; (b) the consumption, possession, or distribution of 
alcohol, unless approved by the University or clinical agen- 
cy, by any nursing student while on University or affiliated 
clinical site premises or while participating in any Univer- 
sity-or affiliated clinical site-sponsored or related activity, 
including any nursing-related course or clinical training ac- 
tivity; and (c) a nursing student's use of alcohol or any drug 
in such a way that the student's performance in any nursing 
course, including activities at any clinical site, is impaired. 

Students in the Upper Division of the BSN program will 
be required to provide (among all other items of informa- 
tion) a signed statement that he or she does or does not en- 
gage in substance abuse activities as defined herein. Further, 
he or she must indicate any legal convictions pertaining to 
the manufacture, use, possession, sale or other distribution 
of illegal or legally controlled substances; pertaining to or 
related to the abuse of alcohol or any other chemical sub- 
stance; and the consequences of any such conviction(s). 

Failure to provide the above-required information, past 
legal convictions for activities related to illegal or legally 
controlled substances, and/or information or evidence that 
reasonably establishes a past pattern of chemical substance 



abuse will be grounds for dismissal from the program. 
However, prior legal convictions related to chemical sub- 
stances will be considered along with all other information 
pertaining to the individual, and will not produce automatic 
dismissal from the program. Discovery that false or fraudu- 
lent or misleading information was provided prior to ma- 
triculation will be grounds for dismissal from the program. 
Students who engage in substance abuse while currently 
enrolled in the program will be subject to dismissal from the 
School of Nursing. 

Physical Examinations 

Each nursing student must have an annual physical ex- 
amination by a physician or a certified nurse practitioner. 
You may choose to have your physical examination through 
you personal health care provider or through the USC Up- 
state Health Service Office (1-864-503-5197). Reports of 
this examination must be submitted on fonns provided from 
the Mary Black School of Nursing and must be received by 
the School of Nursing by published deadlines. Individual 
clinical agencies may require additional documentation for 
specific health requirements which must be met by each stu- 
dent attending that agency. 

Immunizations and Titers 

To comply with clinical agency contracts, each student 
must provide proof of a series of immunizations and/or ti- 
ters. Some of this same information MUST also be sent to 
Health Services on the form sent to you by the USC Upstate 
Admissions Office). We highly recommend that nursing 
students receive the Hepatitis B Vaccine to develop immu- 
nity to this form of viral hepatitis. A series of three doses is 
required to achieve immunity. Students who do not take the 
Hepatitis B Vaccine are required to sign a waiver stating- 
such refusal. The USC Upstate Health Service Office can 
administer the vaccine for the published fee (if bom before 
1978) or free (if born after 1978). Students must submit 
proof of the following immunizations: 

• Tetanus Diphtheria Booster (within last 10 years) 

• Varicella vaccine or positive titer 

• Mumps 

• Rubella vaccine or positive 

• Tuberculosis (negative) PPD (2 step) of a negative chest x-ray 

• Hepatitis B vaccine (see above) 

Nursing students will be caring for clients whose HIV 
status is unknown and all students and faculty use universal 
precautions when caring for any client. Nursing students 
who believe themselves to be at risk for transmission of 
HIV/AIDS are urged to voluntarily inform the University 
Office of Disability Services who will collaborate with fac- 
ulty to determine if modifications in clinical courses can be 
reasonably accommodated. 

Health Insurance 

Clinical agencies are also encouraging students to possess 
health insurance. Hospitals and health agencies provide 
emergency treatment to students for injuries or illness oc- 
curring in the course of the program requirements in their 
agencies. Treatment for illness will be at the expense of the 
students. Treatment for injuries will be covered through 
Workman's Compensation. The University pays all fees 
for enrollment in Workinan's compensation, emergency 
treatment to students for injuries or illness occurring in the 
course of the program requirements in their agencies. 



154 



Mary Black School of Nursing 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Cardio-pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) 

To be in compliance with clinical agency contractual 
agreements, all students in must be certified in CPR (Adult 
and Child/Infant). This certification must be active for the 
entire time you are enrolled in nursing courses at USC Up- 
state. Please check requirements, some CPR certifications 
require annual recertification and some programs require 
recertification every two years. A CPR course is offered at 
USC Upstate Health Services for a nominal fee. 

Liability Insurance 

Each student is covered for malpractice liability under 
the auspices of the University of South Carolina Upstate. 
It is strongly suggested that registered nurses continue to 
maintain their own liability policy. 

Occupational Safety and Health Administration 
(OSHA) 

Students must be current with the standard OSHA re- 
quirements of infection control, fire safety, management of 
hazardous materials, and back safety. Annual testing of this 
information is required for enrollment progression. 

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability 
Act (HIPAA) 

Each student must successfully complete the HIPAA pro- 
gram and test in order to assure compliance with HIPAA 
regulations. Some clinical agencies may require students to 
complete agency specific HIPAA programs and tests also. 

Progression Policies 

1. Any student who fails to take nursing courses in se- 
quence will be removed from the program. 

2. Students must achieve a grade of C or higher in every 
nursing course to progress in the program. Students who 
fail to achieve a minimum grade of C in any nursing course 
(classroom course or clinical/lab course) will be dismissed 
from the program. Students may apply for readmission to 
the program and if readmitted, will be required to repeat 
that course prior to enrolling in any subsequent course. Re- 
admitted students w ho subsequently receive a second grade 
of below "C" in any nursing course will be permanently 
dismissed from the program. 

3. Students who receive a grade less than "C" in any two 
nursing courses will be permanently dismissed from the 
program. 

4. Students must complete the program of required nurs- 
ing course within four years of initial entry into the pro- 
gram. Students who exceed the four year time limit may be 
dismissed from the program. 

Readmission Policies: A student who has been removed 
from the program for receiving a grade of less than "C" in 
one nursing course may reapply for admission to the School 
of Nursing. The student must submit another admission ap- 
plication to the School of Nursing and attach a letter of peti- 
tion for readmission. 

Graduation Requirements. Students must meet all re- 
quirements for graduation as stated in this academic catalog. 
Students graduating with a degree in nursing must have a 
minimum GPA of 2.0 in all required nursing courses. 

Transfer of Credit: Students w ishing to transfer to the 
baccalaureate program from other institutions will have 
their transcripts evaluated to determine the comparability 
with courses at USC Upstate and applicable to the nursing 
program of study. 



Auditing of Nursing Courses: USC Upstate guidelines 
are followed related to auditing of courses. SNUR301: Nu- 
trition and SNUR 302: Pharmacology, may be audited. Af- 
ter admission to the nursing program, the following courses 
may be audited: SBSN 305: Health Promotion Across the 
Lifespan. SBSN 306: Introduction to Professional Nursing, 
SBSN 420: Current Topics, and SBSN 497: Nursing Issues. 
Students may not audit a nursing course with a corequisite 
practicum. No nursing practica may be audited. 

Credit by Examination: Some general education and 
supporting courses may be exempted by having successfully 
passed Advanced Placement ( AP) tests in high school. College 
Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests. Defense Nontradi- 
tional Education Support ( DANTES) tests or challenge exami- 
nations prepared at USC Upstate (see Credit by Examination 
section of this catalog). More specific information may be ob- 
tained fomi the Counseling and Career Development Center. 
RN to BSN sUidents must complete all credit by examination 
prior to the completion of SBSN 350: Concepts of Profes- 
sional Nursing. Licensed practical nurses may obtain credit for 
SNUR 301 and SNUR 302, SBSN 310, SBSN 31 OR SBSN 
305. SBSN 306, SBSN 320P and SBSN 325P by successftilly 
completing the required validation examination. 

College Level Examination Program (CLEP or the 
Defense Activity for Nontraditional Education Sup- 
port (DANTES): Following general university policy, a 
combination of CLEP and/br DANTES examinations may 
be taken to obtain up to 30 hours of credit. Junior and se- 
nior level nursing courses cannot by validated by CLEP of 
DANTES. CLEP or DANTES examinations are not accept- 
able for physiology, anatomy, chemistry or microbiology. 

Professional and Pre-professional Organizations 

Student Nurses Association (SNA) 

The Student Nurses" Association of the Mary Black School 
of Nursing welcomes pre-nursing and nursing students who 
are enrolled in the baccalaureate nursing program and the 
RN to BSN program Through their participation in vari- 
ous activities, students develop awareness of professional 
accountability and ethical standards mandated by the nurs- 
ing profession. Planned, organized monthly meetings that 
focus on the provision of quality health care and advances 
in nursing education contribute to the student's knowledge 
base. By participation in SNA the students develop a lead- 
ership potential that will enable them to be future leaders in 
the nursing profession. 

Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society, 

Mu Rho Chapter 

Sigma Theta Tau International, Honor Society of Nursing 
provides leadership and scholarship in practice, education 
and research to enhance the health of all people. They sup- 
port the learning and professional development of members, 
who strive to improve nursing care worldwide. 

The Mu Rho chapter of Sigma Theta Tau was chartered 
in March 1992. Membership is open to those students in the 
top 35 percent of the senior class who have attained a mini- 
mum cumulative GPA of 3.0. The specific purposes of the 
Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International 
membership are to: 

• Recognize superior achievement; 

• Recognize the development of leadership qualities; 

• Foster high professional standards: 

• Encourage creative work; and 

• Strengthen commitment to the ideals and purposes of the 
profession. 



Mary Black School of Nursing 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



155 



Bachelor of Science in Professional 

Student 
_ General Education Requirements' 



I. Communication 9 

SEGL 101 and SEGL 102 

SSPH20I 

II. Mathematics 6 

One math course: 

SMTH 120, 121% 126 
One additional math, logic, or statistics 

course: SMTH 102; SPSY 225=; SSOC 201 

III. Information Technology 3 

SCSC 138 or SIMS 101 

IV. Natural Science 8 

SBI0 242/242L 

SCHM 109/109L 

V. Arts and Humanities 6 

*No more than 3 credit hours from a specific 
discipline will be accepted for the general 
education requirement under Arts and 
Humanities. 

One fine arts course: SAAS 204; SATH 

101, 105, I06;SMUS 110, 140; STHE 
161, 170 

One additional course fi^om the following: 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 101, 
105, 106; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280, 283, 289, 290, 
291; SFLM 240, 341, 342, 475, 481; SMUS 110, 140; 
SPHL 102, 211;SREL 103; STHE 161, 170 

VI. Foreign Language/Culture^ 3 

Foreign language minimum 102 level 

SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

or placement in a 201 or higher level 
language course.** 
(**Students placing into the 201 or higher level of a lan- 
guage havesatisfied this requirement and will not have additional 
hours in electives.) 



VII. History 



SHST 101, 102, 105 or 106 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 6 

The following 2 courses representing 2 disciplines: 

SPSY 101 

SSOC 101 



'All courses must be completed with a minimum grade ofC 

or better 

'SMTH 121 or higher is the required prerequisite for SPSY 225 



Nursing Curriculum Four- Year Track 
Worksheet 

Major Requirements' 

SBSN 305: Health Promotion 3 

SBSN 306: Intro to Professional 3 

Nursing 

SBSN 3 1 0: Health Assessment 2 

SBSN 3 1 OP: Health Assessment I 

Practicum 
SBSN 320P: Foundations of Nursing 3 

Practicum 
SBSN 325P: Integrated Nursing 3 

Practicum 

SBSN 330: Health Alterations I 3 

SBSN 330P: Health Alterations I 2 

Practicum 
SBSN 340: Nursing of Childbearing 3 

Families 
SBSN 340P: Nursing of Childbearing 2 

Families Practicum 

SBSN 360: Child Health Nursing 3 

SBSN360P: Child Health Nursing 2 

Practicum 

SBSN 370: Nursing Research 3 

SBSN 410: Health Alterations II 3 

SBSN 41 OP: Health Alterations II 3 

Practicum 

SBSN 420: Current Topics in Nursing 3 

SBSN 430: Leadership in Nursing Pr 3 

SBSN 44 1 : Psychiatric Mental 3 

Health Nursing 
SBSN 44 IP: Psychiatric Mental 3 

Health Nursing Practicum 

SBSN 450: Health Alterations III 3 

SBSN 450P: Health Alterations II 2 

Practicum 
SBSN 46 1 : Community & Public 3 

Health Nursing 
SBSN 46 1 P: Community & Public 3 

Health Nursing Practicum 
SBSN 497: Issues in Professional 2 

Nursing (Senior Seminar) 
SBSN499P: Senior Practicum in 3 

Professional Nursing 



Supporting Courses' 

SBI0 232/232L 4 

SBIO330/330L 4 

SPSY 302 3 



Electives' 



Total Hours Required 



128^ 



'If the 101 course is required, it may be counted as an elec- 
tive. If the student places at the 201 level, the foreign language/ 
culture competency has been fulfilled and the student will not be 
required to lake an additional foreign language course or elective 
and can complete the BSN program with 125 credit hours. 



156 



Mary Black School of Nursing 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Bachelor of Science in Nursing Suggested Course Sequence Outline: Four- Year Track 

Other course sequences are also possible: students should seek guidance regarding prerequisites. SMTH 121 or higher is the required 

prerequisite for SPSY225: Pscyhological Statistics. Part-time .study in nursing is available but nursing courses must be completed 

within a maximum of 8 semesters: students should consult with their advisor for proper course sequencing. 

Freshman Year 
FaU 

SEGLlOl 3 

SBI0 232/L 4 

SMTH 120, 121, or 126 3 

SCSC 138 or SIMS 101 3 

Elective •' 

Semester total 1" 

Spring 

SEGL 102 ^ 

SCHM 109/L 4 

SHST 1 1 1 or 1 12 3 

SPSY 101 3 

Fine Art (see list of approved courses) 3 

Semester total *^ 

Sophomore Year 
Fall 

SBI0 242/L ^ 

SPSY 302 3 

SSPH201 3 

SSOC 101 3 

Elective 3 

Semester total 1^ 

Spring 

SBIO330/L 4 

SFRN 102 or SGRM 102 or SSPN 102 3 

SMTH 102 or SPSY 225or SSOC 201 3 

Humanities (see list of approved courses) 3 

Semester total 13 

Junior Year (Admission to the BSN program is required to enroll in SBSN courses 306 and higher). 
First semester 



SBSN 305 ... 
SBSN 306.... 
SBSN 310... 
SBSN 31 OP 



3 

3 

2 

ZZZZZZZZZZ'ZZZ'. 1 

SBSN320P 3 

SBSN325P 3 

Semester total ^^ 

Second semester 

SBSN 330 3 

SBSN330P 2 

SBSN 340 3 

SBSN340P 2 

SBSN 360 3 

SBSN360P 2 

SBSN 370 3 

Semester total ^° 

Senior Year 
First semester 



SBSN 410.... 
SBSN 41 OP. 
SBSN 420 ... 



SBSN 430 3 

SBSN 441 3 

SBSN441P 3 

Semester total 1^ 

Second semester 

SBSN 450 3 

SBSN450P 2 

SBSN 461 3 

SBSN 461 P 3 

SBSN 497 2 

SBSN499P 3 

Semester total 1^ 

Total Hours Required 1^° 

Mary Black School of Nursing 157 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Curriculum Option for Registered Nurses 

The registered nurse track (RN/BSN) is designed for graduates of associate degree and diploma programs in nurs- 
ing. It is comprised of courses in nursing, sciences and liberal arts. Registered nurses, who have completed successfully 
the elective, general education, and supporting courses, and who have met the admission requirements, may complete the 
program in one calendar year of study as outlined in the course sequence. Students must begin the program of study in the 
fall semester to complete the one-year option. Courses are offered via SC ETV, at the University Center Greenville, and 
via the Internet. Didactic classes on ETV and at UCG will be held one day per week, while internet courses are offered in 
the asynchronous mode. All registered nurse track students will complete clinical practica at times convenient to them and 
their preceptors. Students desiring part-time study or completion of the program of study on the USC Upstate campus will 
require a longer period of time to complete the program. 

All policies related to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing four-year track program apply to the registered nurse track 
unless specifically identified as four-year track policies. 

Admission Requirements 

See Admission Requirements in this section. 

Advanced Placement 

Registered nurse track students may receive up to 35 semester credit hours in nursing based upon successful comple- 
tion of an associate degree nursing program or a diploma nursing program, licensure as a registered nurse, and successful 
completion at USC Upstate ofSBSN350. 

Continuation Standards 

See Continuation Standards in this section. 

Academic Residency 

RN-BSN track students are required to meet the USC Upstate academic residency requirement. The last 25% (32 
semester hours) of the curriculum must be courses offered through USC Upstate. 



RN-BSN Track One- Year Option Course Sequence Outline 

(Part-lime study is also possible: students should seek guidance regarding required sequencing.) 

Prerequisite Credit: 

General Education Support Course, Electives 61 

Advanced Placement Credit for Nursing Courses 35 

Fall Semester 

SBSN350 3 

SBSN350S 3 

SBSN3I0 2 

SBSN310P 1 

SBSN430 3 

Semester total 12 

Spring Semester 

SBSN370 3 

SBSN420 3 

SBSN435P 3 

SBSN498 3 

Semester total 12 

Summer 

SBSN461 3 

SBSN461P 3 

SBSN497 2 

Semester total 8 

Total Hours Required 128 



158 Mary Black School of Nursing 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Bachelor of Science in Professional Nursing Curriculum RN-BSN Track 

Student Worksheet 



General Education Requirements' 



I. Communication < 

SEGL 101 and SEGL 102 

SSPH201 

II. Mathematics ( 

One math course: 

SMTH 120, 121-, 126 
One additional math, logic, or statistics 

course: SMTH 102; SPSY225-; 

SSOC 201 

III. Information Technology '. 

SCSC 138 or SIMS 101 



IV. Natural Science 8 

SBI0 242/242L 

SCHM 109/109L 

V. Arts and Humanities 6 

*No more than 3 credit hours from a specific 
discipline will be accepted for the general 
education requirement under Arts and 
Humanities. 

One fine arts course: SAAS 204; SATH 

101, 105, 106;SMUS 110, 140; STHE 
161, 170 

One additional course from the following: 

SAAS 204; SAMS 101, 102; SATH 101, 
105, 106; SEGL 250, 252, 275, 279, 280. 283, 289, 290, 
291; SFLM 240, 341, 342, 475, 481; SMUS 110, 140; 
SPHL 102, 211; SREL 103; STHE 161, 170 



Major Requirements' 



SBSN 350: Professional Nursing 

Role Transition 

SBSN 350S: Professional Nursing 

Role Transition Seminar 

SBSN 310: Health Assessment 
^ SBSN 31 OP: Health Assessment 

Practicum 

SBSN 370: Nursing Research 
" SBSN 420: Current Topics in Nursing 
" SBSN 430: Leadership in Nursing Pr 
^ SBSN 435P: Professional 

Nursing Role Transition 

SBSN 46 1 : Community & Public 

Health Nursing 

SBSN 46 IP: Community & Public 

Health Nursing Practicum 

SBSN 497: Issues in Professional 

Nursing Practice (Senior Seminar) 

SBSN 498: Professional 

Nursing Role Transition Project 



Supporting Courses' 

SB10 232/232L 

SB1O330/330L 

SPSY 302 



Advanced Placement 

Advanced Placement credit for 

RN-BSN track students who meet the 
advanced placement requirement 

Electives' 



35 



VI. Foreign Language/Culture 

Foreign language minimum 102 level 
SFRN 102; SGRM 102; SSPN 102 

or placement in a 201 or higher level 

language course. 



Total Hours Required 



128 



VII. History 



SHST 101, 102, 105, or 106 



VIII. Social and Behavioral Sciences 

SPSY 101 

SSOC 101 



'All courses must he completed with a minimum grade ofC 

or better 

-SMTH 121 or higher is the required prerequisite for 

SPSY 225 

-'If the foreign language 101 course is required, it may he 

counted as an elective. If the student places at the 201 level, 

the foreign language/culture competency has heen fulfilled 

and the student will not he required to take an additional 

foreign language course or elective and can complete the 

BSN program with 125 credit hours. 



Mary Black School of Nursing 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



159 




Course Descriptions 



Descriptions 

Descriptions of ail courses offered for undergraduate 
credit are arranged alphabetically by academic discipline 
on the following pages. Not all courses are available 
every term. A schedule of classes is available before the 
registration period for each term as an announcement of 
course offerings. Students are advised to consult these 
schedules prior to registration. The University reserves 
the right to withdraw any course on the grounds of insuf- 
ficient enrollment. 

Course Numbering 

use Upstate courses numbered from 00 1 to 599 may 
be taken for undergraduate credit. The following distinc- 
tions are made among course numbers: 

101-299 Lower division courses primarily for 
students with freshman and sopho- 
more standing. 

300-499 Upper division courses primarily for 
students with junior and senior standing. 

400-599 Upper division courses primarily for 
students with senior standing. 

With consent of the advisor, a student may take 
courses numbered above or below the level normally taken 
by their academic classification (freshman, sophomore, 
junior or senior). 

Course Credit 

The credit value of each course is usually determined 
by the number of class meetings per week for one semester. 
Two or three laboratory hours (one period) are equivalent 
to one class meeting. The semester hour credit for each 
course is included in each course description. 

Prerequisites 

Students may be removed from any class for which 
prerequisites or other defined requirements have not 
been met. 



African American Studies (SAAS) 

SAAS 201. Introduction to African American Studies 

(3) An introduction to the methods and themes of African 
American Studies. Topics include the development of the 
discipline, major frameworks, research and writing in the 
subject area. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SAAS 204. African American Culture (3) An intro- 
duction to the ideas and customs of African Americans 
including but not limited to artistic, anthropological 
psychological, linguistic, and culinary dimensions. Pre- 
requisite: SEGL 102. 

SAAS 398. Topics in African American Studies (3) 

Intensive study of selected topics. Prerequisite: SEGL 
102. 



American Studies (SAMS) 

SAMS 101. American Studies, 17th-19tli Century (3) 

A survey of the historical, political, social, economic and 
cultural forces that shaped American life from the early 
seventeenth to the late nineteenth century. 

SAMS 102. American Studies, 20tli Century (3) A 

sur\'ey of the historical, political, social, economic and 
cultural forces that have shaped American life in the 
twentieth century. 

SAMS 398. Topics in American Studies (3) Interdis- 
ciplinary reading and research on selected aspects of 
American culture. May be taken more than once if the 
topic is different. Prerequisite: SAMS 101 or 102, junior 
or senior standing, or consent of instructor. 

SAMS 399. Independent Study (1-3) An individualized, 
contracted program of study planned in conjunction with 
a faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

Anthropology (SANT) 

SANT 102. Understanding Other Cultures (3) Introduc- 
tion to the concepts, methods and data of socio-cultural 
anthropology and anthropological linguistics. 

Art Education (SAED) 

SAED 330. Foundations of Art Education (3) Intro- 
duction to art education as a profession through theories, 
historical references and philosophies. Current initia- 
tives in the field will be reviewed through educational 
research. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of "C" in SART 
103 and 110. 

SAED 429. Elementary and Middle School Methods 
for Art Education (3) Instructional strategies to construct 
appropriate curriculum for K-8 schools. The topics are 
artistic growth of children, responding to art works, stu- 
dio production and classroom management. A portion 
of the course includes a 30 hour practicum component. 
Prerequisites: SAED 330 and admission to the profes- 
sional program. 

SAED 430. Secondary Methods for Art Education (3) 

Curriculum designs for secondary visual arts classroom. 
The development of instructional skills for various student 
populations is included in the course of study as well as 
research and current initiatives. The course includes a 30 
hour practicum component in the schools. Prerequisites: 
SAED 429 and admission to the professional program. 

SAED 450. School Art Program (3) Developing and 
working with essential components of visual arts programs 
in the schools, including the national and state standards 
with assessment methodology. Also a supervised clini- 
cal experience in the school art classrooms of 40 hours 
provides strategies to teach art in grades K- 1 2. Observa- 
tion and participation in classroom settings is required to 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



161 



focus on classroom management and conflict resolution. 
Prerequisites: S AED 429 and admission to the professional 
program in art education. 

SAED 460. Directed Teaching in Art Education (3) A 

super\ised clinical experience consisting of 15 weeks in 
school setting, normally with 50% in elementary level and 
the remaining 50% in the middle or secondary level. In 
addition to teaching in the K-12 school classroom, candi- 
dates participate in regular seminars where they { 1 ) analyze 
problems relating to their K-12 experiences; (2) explore 
ethical and legal issues and trends in K-12 education; (3) 
consider current issues and trends in K- 1 2 education; and 
(4) complete their professional portfolios. Prerequisite: 
approved application of directed teaching. Pass/Fail. 



Art History (SATH) 

SATH 101. Introduction to Art (3) Formal, historical 
and iconographic analysis of architectural monuments, 
paintings and sculpture; aspects of various theories of art 
and architecture. 

SATH 105. History of Western Art: Prehistory-Middle 

Ages (3) Survey of the visual arts from Paleolithic times to 
the Medieval period, with emphasis on the major civiliza- 
tions of Egypt, the Ancient Near East, Rome, Byzantium 
and Medieval Europe. 

SATH 106. History of Western Art: Renaissance-Pres- 
ent (3) Survey of the visual arts in Western civilizations 
from the Renaissance to the present. 

SATH 301 . Women and Art (3) Art by women and about 
women as it relates to issues of gender and sexual identity 
and how these intersect with social and historical construc- 
tions of race and class. Emphasis is on reading, research 
and written material. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SATH 304. Southern Folk Art (3) Techniques and tradi- 
tions of Southern folk art concentrating on artists of South 
Carolina. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SATH 305. American Art (3) Colonial era to the present. 
Particular attention is paid to the relationship of the visual arts 
to social and political history and to the way visual culture 
shaped early ideas about nationhood. Emphasis is on reading, 
research and written material. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SATH 306. Twentieth Century Art(3) Major developments 

in art ofthe past century. Intemational perspectives are stressed 
as are social, political and intellectual contexts. Emphasis 
is on reading, research and written material. Prerequisites: 
SATH 106 or SATH 305 or consent of instructor 

SATH 308. History of Design (3) From the Industrial 
Revolution to the present. The social, cultural, economic, 
political, technical and aesthetic contexts of design are 
explored. Emphasis is on reading, research and written 
material. Prerequisites: SATH 106 or 305 or consent of 
instructor 



SATH 309. History of Photography (3) How photographs 
create meaning in and are given meaning by their social and 
historical contexts from the 1 830s to the present. Emphasis 
is on reading, research and written material. Prerequisites: 
SATH 106 or 305 or SJOU 201 or 302. 

SATH 310. African Art (3) Prehistory to the present. 
Particular attention is paid to the complexity of African 
cultures and to the social roles that art fills in the lives of its 
makers and consumers. Emphasis is on reading, research 
and written material. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SATH 350. Art History Study Abroad (3-6) Travel 
in selected regions outside the United States, and field 
study of historical and contemporary art and artists, with 
emphasis on art history. 

SATH 352. Art History Field Study (3) Critical examina- 
tion of major developments in contemporary art involving 
travel to major metropolitan areas in the United States. 
Course may be taken twice if the city is different. Emphasis 
is on reading, research and written material. Prerequisite: 
3 hours of art history credit or consent of instructor. 

SATH 398. Selected Topics in Art History (3) Intensive 
study of selected topics in art history. 

SATH 399. Independent Study (3) Design and devel- 
opment of research projects of a complex and extensive 
nature. A student may repeat SATH 399 with a different 
independent study contract description for a total of no 
more than six hours of undergraduate credit. Prerequisites: 
Junior level standing and consent ofthe instructor. 

SATH 400. Art History Methods (3) Philosophical and 
historical underpinnings ofart history, theory and criticism. 
Advanced readings address traditional analytical models 
and new theories generated by modernism and postmod- 
ernism. Emphasis is on reading, research and written 
material. Prerequisites: 3 hours of art history credit or 
consent of instructor. 

SATH 450. Art History Study Abroad II (3-6) Travel in 
selected regions outside the United States, and advanced 
field study of historical and contemporary art and artists, 
with emphasis on art history. Prerequisite: 6 credit hours 
ofart or consent ofthe instructor. 

SATH 499. Art History Internship (3-6) Supervised work 
experience in an art history related environment, resulting 
in a meaningful project/activity for the employing firm 
and a scholarly project for the student. For three intern- 
ship credit hours, a minimum of 135 hours of scheduled 
work, periodic class meetings and consultation with the 
instructor are required. A contractual agreement signed 
by the employer, the student, the instructor, the dean ofthe 
college is mandatory. Standard grading. A student may 
repeat SATH 499 with a ditTerent internship description 
for a total of no more than six hours of undergraduate 
credit. Prerequisites: Junior level standing with 6 hours 
in art history or consent ofthe instructor. 



162 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Art Studio (SART) 

SART 103. Fundamentals of Two Dimensional Design 

(3) Introduction to visual thinking and principles of two- 
dimensional design, including line, form, space, texture, 
color and basic technical skills. 

SART 104. Fundamentals of Three Dimensional Design 

(3) Introduction to visual thinking and principles of three- 
dimensional design, including form, volume and space. 

SART 108. Computer Graphics I (3) Introduction to the 

hardware and software used in creating graphic design 
and illustration. 

SART 110. Drawing I (3) Introduction to the materials 
and techniques of drawing, emphasizing visual perception 
and drawing skills. 

SART 202. Ceramics I (3) Process of forming, decorat- 
ing, glazing and firing. Prerequisite: SART 104 or consent 
of instructor. 

SART 203. Color and Composition (3) Color theory and 
compositional systems. Prerequisite: SART 103. 

SART 204. Three Dimensional Studies II (3) Mate- 
rials and techniques of three dimensional design and 
sculpture beyond the introductory level. Prerequisite: 
SART 104. 

SART 205. Digital Art I (3) Creative approaches to de- 
veloping fine art projects at the intermediate level using 
raster and vector computer graphics. Projects emphasize 
image development, two and three-dimensional design 
solutions and content. Prerequisites: SART 108 or con- 
sent of instructor. 

SART 206. Illustration I (3) Introduction to illustration 
with an emphasis on visual problem solving, creativity, 
effective communication and aesthetics. Visual skills are 
defined through exploration of various media resulting in 
appropriate visual solutions for illustration communica- 
tion. Prerequisite: SART 103, SART 210, or consent of 
instructor. 

SART 207. Printmaking I (3) Materials and techniques 
of major printmaking processes in historical and contem- 
porary application. Techniques include relief, intaglio, 
lithography and monotype. Prerequisite: SART 203. 

SART 210. Drawing II (3) Materials and techniques 
of drawing beyond the introductory level. Prerequisite: 
SART 1 1 or consent of instructor. 

SART 211. Introduction to Painting (3) Materials and 
techniques of painting, emphasizing color theory, compo- 
sitional structures, content, and expression. Prerequisite: 
SART 203 or consent of instructor. 

SART 214. Graphic Design I (3) Creative problem-solv- 
ing with emphasis on 2-D solutions to conceptual prob- 



lems; translation of concept into form using word, image 
and layout; introduction to history of graphic design and 
typography. Prerequisites: SART 108. Prerequisite or 
corequisite: SART 110 or consent of the instructor. 

SART 228. Business for the Visual Artist (3) Aspects of 
business relevant to the visual artist, emphasizing basic ac- 
counting and taxes; marketing and promotion; copyrights; 
sales by artist, gallery, or agent; and contracts. Feedback is 
received through class discussions and exercises, written 
examinations, and a final team project. Prerequisites: 6 hours 
of art history and/or art studio or consent of instructor. 

SART 229. Introduction to Crafts (3) Traditional craft 
media: techniques, design and contemporary concepts. 

SART 230. Design and Technology (3) Introduction for 
non-majors to design principles, layout and publication 
using computer technology and emphasizing practical uses 
and applications. Does not count for credit in the B.F.A. 
Art Studio degree. Prerequisite: SCSC 138 or higher. 

SART 231. Introduction to Life Drawing (3) Emphasis 
on visual perception and skills of life drawing from the 
live model in a variety of media, using both clothed and 
unclothed male and female models. Prerequisite: SART 
2 1 or consent of instructor. 

SART 255. Art Practicum (1) Participation in art 
production and activities, including art gallery and art 
exhibition preparation and maintenance, exhibition pub- 
licity and announcement design and distribution, studio 
and equipment preparation maintenance and monitoring, 
art information services including art department and art 
gallery web site design and maintenance. No fonnal class 
meetings. Requires 30 contact hours per semester. May 
be repeated for a total of four credits. 

SART 261 . Introduction to Photography (3) Techniques 
and procedures of photography, including processing. 
Prerequisite: SART 103 or consent of instructor. 

SART 262. Digital Photography (3) Technical, aesthetic 
and conceptual procedures of digital photography includ- 
ing composing, shooting, processing, manipulation and 
printing. Prerequisite: SART 108. 

SART 302. Ceramics II (3) Ceramic processes and 
techniques and technical investigation in clay bodies and 
glazes with emphasis on the wheel throwing technique. 
Prerequisite: SART 202 or consent of instructor. 

SART 305. Digital Art II (3) Creative approaches to 
developing fine art projects at the advanced level using 
raster and vector computer graphics. Projects emphasize 
personal image development, two and three-dimensional 
design solutions, and content. Prerequisite: SART 205. 

SART 306. Illustration II (3) Continued exploration of 
visual communication with an emphasis on concept and 
professional quality of work. Prerequisite: SART 206 or 
consent of instructor. 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



163 



SART 307. Printmaking II (3) Intermediate application 
of materials and techniques of major printmaking processes 
in historical and contemporary application. Emphasis is 
on content, individual expression, and series development. 
Prerequisite: SART 207. 

SART 310. Drawing III (3) Methods and materials of 
graphic representation and expression with emphasis on in- 
dividual creative expression. Prerequisite: SART 2 10. 

SART 311. Painting II (3) Intermediate application of 
materials and techniques of painting processes using 
representational and non-representational subject mat- 
ter. Emphasis is on content and individual expression. 
Prerequisite: SART 211. 

SART 314. Graphic Design II (3) Continuation of trans- 
lation of concept into form with emphasis on typography, 
letterfomis, typographic syntax and type specification. 
Prerequisite: SART 2 14 or consent of instructor. 

SART 315. Graphic Design III (3) Advanced design 
problems with emphasis on individual development and 
exploration of contemporary design issues. Prerequisite: 
SART 314 and successfiil completion of portfolio review. 

SART 318. Interface Design I (3) Introduction to technical 
and aesthetic concepts and problem solving of interface 
design including but not limited to web design, CD ROM 
design, collection and preparation for basic assets (graph- 
ics, video, sound). Prerequisite; SART 214 or consent 
of instructor. 



SART 402. Ceramics III (3) Advanced ceramic processes 
and techniques and technical investigation in clay bodies 
and glazes with emphasis on the wheel throwingtechnique. 
Prerequisite: SART 302. 

SART 407. Printmaidng III (3) Intaglio, lithography, 
block printing, and the advanced execution of original 
works in these media. Prerequisite: SART 307. 

SART 410. Drawing IV (3) Advanced methods and 
materials of graphic representation and expression with 
emphasis on individual creative expression. Prerequisite: 
SART 3 10. 

SART 411. Painting III (3) Advanced application of 
materials and techniques of painting processes using 
representational and non-representational subject matter. 
Emphasis is on content, individual expression, and series 
development. Prerequisite: SART 311. 

SART 414. Graphic Design IV (3) Graphic problem 
solving in the community /business environment; advanced 
production techniques for the graphic designer. Prereq- 
uisite: SART 315. 

SART 418. Interface Design II (3) Intermediate inter- 
face design with emphasis on individual development 
and exploration of contemporary technical and aesthetic 
design issues including but not limited to web design, CD 
ROM design, collection and preparation of basic assets 
(graphics, video, sound). Prerequisite: SART 318 or 
consent of instructor. 



SART 350. Art Study Abroad (3-6) Travel in selected 
regions outside the United States, and field study of his- 
torical and contemporary art and artists with emphasis on 
studio techniques. 

SART 361. Photography II (3) Technical, historical 
and aesthetic aspects of photography. Projects allow the 
development of personal imagery and technique. Prereq- 
uisite: SART 261. 

SART 362. Photography III (3) An historical and critical 
approach to photography. Several majorprojects utilize tradi- 
tional or alternative techniques. Prerequisites: SART 36 1 . 

SART 391. Motion Graphic Design (3) Introduction to 
animated interface design as applied to the graphic design 
and communications industry. Prerequisite: SART 318. 

SART 398. Special Topics in Art (3) Intensive study of 
selected topics in art. Prerequisites: junior level standing 
with 6 hours in art or consent of the instructor. 

SART 399. Independent Study (1-6) Opportunities to 
design and develop projects of a complex and extensive 
nature in keeping with the student's major creative inter- 
ests. A student may repeat SART 399 with a different 
independent study contract description for a total of no 
more than six hours of undergraduate credit. Prerequisite: 
Junior level standina and consent of instructor. 



SART 450. Art Study Abroad II (3-6) Travel in selected 
regions outside the United States, and advanced field 
study of historical and contemporary art and artists, with 
emphasis on studio techniques. Prerequisite: 6 credit 
hours of art or consent of the instructor. 

SART 489. Senior Portfolio Development (3) Revision 
and finalization of projects, thesis, portfolio/vita prepara- 
tion. Prerequisites: SART 315; Corequisite: SART 414. 

SART 490. Senior Seminar Graphic Design (3) Prepa- 
ration of thesis, senior exhibition, portfolio finalization, 
oral presentation, and explorations of ethical issues. 
Prerequisite: SART 489. 

SART 499. Art Studio Internship (3-6) Supervised 
work experience in an art environment, resulting in a 
meaningful project/activity for the employing firm and 
a scholarly project for the student. For three internship 
credit hours, a minimum of 1 35 hours of scheduled work, 
periodic class meetings and consultation with the instruc- 
tor are required. A contractual agreement signed by the 
employer, the student, the instructor, and the dean of the 
college is mandatory. Standard grading. A student may 
repeat SART 499 with a different internship description 
for a total of no more than six hours of undergraduate 
credit. Prerequisites; Junior level standing with 6 hours 
in art or consent of the instructor. 



164 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Astronomy (SAST) 

SAST 111. Descriptive Astronomy (3) The universe: 
physical processes and methods of study. (SAST 1 1 IL is 
available for additional credit.) 

SAST lllL. Descriptive Astronomy Laboratory (1) 

Demonstrations, exercises and night vievvings. Three hours 
per week. Prerequisite or Corequisite: SAST 111. 

Biology (SBIO) 

SBIO 101. Biological Science 1 (4) Biological principles 
underlying cell chemistry, cell biology, classification, 
plant diversity, plant anatomy, and physiology. Designed 
for science majors. Three class and three laboratory hours 
per week. 

SBIO 102. Biological Science IF (4) Biological principles 
underlying cell origins, genetics, diversity of monera, pro- 
tista, and animals; mammalian anatomy and physiology. 
Dissection of preserved specimens is required. Prerequisite: 
SBIO 101. Designed for science majors. Three class and 
three laboratory hours per week. 

SBIO 110. General Biology (4) Current principles of cell 
biology, biochemistry, genetics, reproduction, develop- 
ment, and plant and animal diversity, as well as societal 
concerns. Not for major credit. Three class and three 
laboratory hours per week. 

SBIO 201. Introduction to Ecology and Evolutionary 
Biology (4) Basic, applied, and theoretical ecology and 
the foundations of evolutionary biology. Laboratories 
illustrate lecture concepts and provide experience with 
fundamental skills of biostatistics, hypothesis testing, and 
scientific writing. Prerequisites: SBIO 101 and 102 with 
a "C" or better or consent of instructor. Three class and 
three laboratory hours per week. 

SBIO 202. Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology 

(4) Basic principles of the origin, evolution, function and 
diversity of cells. Emphasis is placed on molecular level 
approaches to the scientific study of eukaryotic cell func- 
tion, physiology, metabolism, ultrastructure, and evolution, 
as well as the use of cells relevant to medical, biosocial, 
and bioenvironmental issues. Prerequisite: SBIO 201 
with "C" or better. Three class and three laboratory hours 
per week. 

SBIO 205. Introduction to Field Ornithology (3) Basic 
morphology, ecology, behavior, evolution, identification, 
and natural history of birds with emphasis on the major 
groups and species found in South Carolina. Local and 
regional weekly field trips, including a weekend long trip 
focused on coastal and marine species identification and 
their natural history, are required. Biology 205/305 will be 
offered concurrently. Projects for students enrolled in SBIO 
305 will be more in depth and the standard for grading 
will be more demanding. Students may not receive credit 
for both courses. Biology 205 cannot be taken for major 
credit. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. 



SBIO 205L. Introduction to Field Ornithology Labo- 
ratory (1) Additional hours in the application of avian 
field identification techniques and in the observation of 
the natural history traits and characteristics of the com- 
mon and important birds of South Carolina and vicinity. 
Biology 205L/305L will be offered concurrently. Projects 
for students enrolled in SBIO 305 L will be more in depth 
and the standard for grading will be more demanding. 
Students may not receive credit for both courses. SBIO 
205L cannot be taken for major credit. Pre- or Corequisite: 
SBIO 205 or consent of instructor. 

SBIO 206. Genetics and Society (3) Fundamentals of 
genetics, with an emphasis on human genetics; relevance 
of recent advances and concerns in contemporary society 
related to genetic technology. Not for major credit. 

SBIO 232. Human Anatomy (4) Gross and microscopic 
structure of the systems of the human body including es- 
sential technical terminology. Dissection of preserved 
specimens is required. Three class and three laboratory 
hours per week. 

SBIO 240. Human Biology and Society (3) Fundamentals 
of functional human biology; development of a relevant 
knowledge of medical issues and concerns in contemporary 
society such as cloning, emerging diseases, genetic testing, 
cancer, emphysema, organ transplants and cardiovascular 
disease. Not for major credit. 

SBIO 242. Human Physiology (4) Functions of systems 
of the body emphasizing homeostasis, biochemistry and 
control mechanisms. Three class and three laboratory 
hours per week. Prerequisite: SBIO 232, and SCHM 109 
orSCHM 111. 

SBIO 270. Environmental Science (3) The interrelation- 
ship of humans and their environment emphasizing the im- 
pact of pollution on human health. Not for major credit. 

SBIO 305. Field Ornithology (3) Basic morphology, ecol- 
ogy, behavior, evolution, identification, and natural history 
of birds w ith emphasis on the major groups and species 
found in South Carolina. Local and regional weekly field 
trips, including a weekend long trip focused on coastal and 
marine species identification and their natural history, are 
required. Biology 205/305 will be offered concurrently. 
Projects for students enrolled in SBIO 305 will be more in 
depth and the standard for grading will be more demanding. 
Students may not receive credit for both courses. Biology 
205 cannot be taken for major credit. Prerequisites: SBIO 
101 and 102 or consent of instructor. 

SBIO 305L. Field Ornithology Laboratory (1) Addi- 
tional hours in the application of avian field identification 
techniques and in the observation of the natural history 
traits and characteristics of the common and important 
birds of South Carolina and vicinity. Biology 205L/305L 
will be offered concurrently. Projects for students enrolled 
in SBIO 305L will be more in depth and the standard for 
grading will be more demanding. Students may not receive 
credit for both courses. SBIO 205L cannot be taken for 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



165 



major credit. Pre- or Corequisite: SBIO 305 or consent 
of instructor. 

SBIO 310. Invertebrate Zoology (4) Phylogenetic and 
comparative aspects of anatomy, physiology, ecology, 
reproduction and embryology of the invertebrates. Dis- 
section of preserved specimens is required. Three class 
and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: SBIO 

101 and 102 or consent of instructor. 

SBIO 315. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (4) Phy- 
logenetic and comparative aspects of structure, develop- 
ment, and evolution. Dissection of preserved specimens 
is required. Three class and three laboratory hours per 
week. Prerequisites: SBIO 101 and 102 or consent of 
instructor. 

SBIO 320. General Botany (4) Phylogenetic survey of 
the morphology, anatomy, and taxonomy of the major 
plant divisions. Three lecture and three laboratory hours 
per week. Prerequisites: SBIO 101 and 102 or consent 
of instructor. 

SBIO 330. Microbiology (4) Introduction to bacteria and 
viruses, emphasizing morphology, pathogenic microbes, 
antigen-antibody relationships, and antimicrobial agents 
in chemotherapy. Three class and three laboratory hours 
per week. Prerequisites: four hours of biological science 
and SCHM 109 or SCHM 1 1 1 or consent of instructor. 

SBIO 350. Genetics (4) Basic principles of transmission, 
molecular and population genetics. Three class and three 
laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: SBIO 101 and 

102 or consent of instructor. 

SBIO 370. Pathophysiology (3) Disruptions of normal 
physiology, processes that bring about disruptions, and 
manifestations of disruptions. Prerequisites: SBIO 232, 
242 and 330 or consent of instructor. 

SBIO 375. Evolutionary Biology (4) Historical develop- 
ment of evolutionary theory; natural and sexual selection; 
micro-and macroevolution; mass extinctions; current 
concepts of phylogeny and systematics; human evolution. 
Laboratories illustrate lecture concepts as well as read- 
ings from the primary literature. Three class and three 
laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: SBIO 201 or 
consent of instructor. 

SBIO 380. Biogeography (4) The distribution of plant 
and animal species and the ecological, biological and 
geographic phenomena controlling such patterning. Labs 
consist of a series of weekend field trips. Prerequisites: 
SBIO 101 and 102 or consent of instructor. 

SBIO 390. Gross Human Anatomy (3) An investiga- 
tion of human anatomy using cadaver dissection in a 
laboratory setting. Prerequisite: SBIO 232 or consent 
of instructor. 

SBI0395. Internship in Biological Science (1-3) Super- 
vised work experience in biological science. A minimum 



166 



of three hours work per week is required for each credit 
hour. Acontractual agreement signed by the supervisor, the 
student, the instructor, and the division chair is required. 
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. Pass/fail credit. 

SBIO 398. Topics in Biology (1-3) Intensive study in 
selected areas. Individual topics are announced. Prereq- 
uisite: consent of instructor. 

SBIO 399. Independent Study (1-3) Directed research 
project. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Not for major 
credit. 

SBIO 507. Developmental Biology (4) Morphoge- 
netic patterns of embryonic development along with 
their molecular and cellular bases; and mechanisms of 
differentiation. Three class and three laboratory hours 
per week. Prerequisites: SBIO 101 and 102 or consent 
of instructor. 

SBIO 525. Plant Taxonomy (4) The major classes of 
flowering plants found in South Carolina. Emphasis is 
placed on economic and horticultural uses. Three class 
and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: SBIO 
101 and 102 or consent of instructor. 

SBIO 530. Histology (4) The microscopic anatomy of 
human cells, tissues and organs. Three class and three 
laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: two semesters 
of biological science and two semesters of chemistry. 

SBIO 531. Parasitology (4) Parasites of animals, with 
emphasis on the immunological, clinical and epidemiologi- 
cal aspects of human parasitism. Dissection of specimens 
is required. Three class and three laboratory hours per 
week. Prerequisites: two semesters of biological science 
and two semesters of chemistry. 

SBIO 534. Animal Behavior (4) Identification and clas- 
sification of behavior patterns exhibited by various species 
of animals; the development of behavior; proximate and 
ultimate causes of behavior. Three hours class and three 
hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: six credits in 
basic psychology, or SPSY 101 and SBIO 102. 

SBIO 535. Neurobiology (4) Introduction to neuro- 
anatomical-functional relationships. Topics include the 
anatomical organization of major nuclei and tracts, neuro- 
chemical mechanisms, and neural integration of behavior. 
Three class and three laboratory hours/week. Prerequisites: 
SBIO 101 & 102 or consent of instructor. 

SBIO 540. Immunology (4) Introduction to the molecu- 
lar and cellular basis of the immune response. Topics 
include anatomy of the lymphoid system, and innate 
immune response, lymphocyte biology, antigen-antibody 
interactions, humoral and cellular effector mechanisms; 
control of immune responses, and the evolution of im- 
munodefense mechanisms. Prerequisites: SBIO 102 and 
SCHM 112; and Pre- or Corequisite: SBIO 330 or 340; 
or consent of instructor. Three class and three laboratory 
hours per week. 

Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



SBIO 550. Molecular Cell Biology (4) Structure and func- 
tions of nucleic acids and proteins; molecular arrangement 
of prokaryotic, and eukaryotic genomes; the processes of 
DNA replication. DNA repair, gene transcription, and pro- 
tein translation; control and coordination of gene activity 
as they relate to cellular processes in normal and disease 
states. Techniques used in contemporary molecular biology 
labs including recombinant DNA, electophoresis of nucleic 
acids and proteins. Western blotting, and bioinformatics are 
covered in the laboratory. Three class and three laboratory 
hours per week. Prerequisites: SBIO 202 and eight hours 
of chemistry, or consent of instructor. 

SBIO 570. Principles of Ecology (4) Interactions of 
organisms and the environment; ecosystems structure 
and fijnctions. Three class and three laboratory hours per 
week. Prerequisite: SBIO 102. 

SBIO 581. Biochemistry I (3) (=SCHM 581) Stmcture 
and function of the major classes of biological compounds 
and biological membranes. Content includes a kinetic and 
equilibrium based approach to biological transport and 
catalysis, signaling, and an introduction to bioenergetics. 
Prerequisite: SCHM 332 or consent of instructor. 

SBIO 582. Biochemistry II (3) (=SCHM 582) Chemistry 
of biological information pathways. DNA, RNA, and pro- 
tein metabolism, organization of genes on chromosomes, 
regulation of gene expression, and applications of these 
topics to biotechnology problems are covered. Prerequisite: 
SBIO 54 1 /SCHM 58 1 or consent of instructor. 

SBIO 583L. Biochemistry Laboratory (1) (=SCHM 

583L) A survey of laboratory methods in biochemistry. 
Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite or coreq- 
uisite: SCHM 581 or 582. 

SBIO 599. Senior Seminar (3) Integration of biological 
knowledge at an advanced level and exploration of ethical 
issues. Prerequisites: statistics, SSPH 20 1 , and a minimum 
grade of "C" in SBIO 101, SBIO 102. SBIO 201, SBIO 
202, and 1 2 hours of biology coursework at the 300 level 
or above; or consent of instructor. 

Business Administration (SBAD) 

SBAD 225. Financial Accounting (3) Principles of ex- 
ternal financial reporting for business entities, including 
income measurement and determination of financial posi- 
tion. Prerequisites: SMTH 120 or 121 or 126. 

SBAD 226. Managerial Accounting (3) Attention-direct- 
ing and problem solving functions of accounting in relation 
to planning and control, evaluation of performance, and 
special decisions. Prerequisite: SBAD 225. 

SBAD 290. Introduction to Business Information 
Systems (3) Fundamental information systems concepts 
and overview of information technology. Topics include: 
computer hardware, information systems software, tele- 
communications. Networks database and spreadsheet 
applications, business applications, and the Internet, Elec- 



tronic commerce, and the World Wide Web. Prerequisites: 
SCSC 138 or 141. 

SBAD 298. Gateways to Business (3) Nature of business 
and business skills required for success in the twenty-first 
century. Business environments in the Upstate are discussed 
in relation to individual career goals. 

Note: Students seeking a degree in business must be 
admitted to the Professional Program (Upper Divi- 
sion) before enrolling in 300-level and above business 
administration and economics courses. Students not 
majoring in business must have 54 credit hours earned 
to take 300-level and above business administration and 
economics courses. Additional prerequisites are included 
in individual course descriptions. Students not majoring 
in business can enroll in no more than 29 semester hours 
of Johnson College of Business and Economics courses, 
excluding SECO 221, 222, 291, and 292. 

SBAD 331. Intermediate Accounting I (3) Financial 
accounting theory and practice as they relate to generally 
accepted accounting principles. Included are external fi- 
nancial reports with emphasis on the balance sheet and the 
income statement. Prerequisites: 54 credit hours earned 
and SBAD 226. 

SBAD 332. Intermediate Accounting II (3) Expands upon 
the financial accounting concepts and principles developed 
in Intermediate Accounting I. Key concepts include current 
liabilities, bonds, earnings per share, pensions, leases, and 
stockholders' equity. Prerequisites: 54 credit hours earned 
and SBAD 331 with a minimum grade of C. 

SBAD 333. Cost Accounting (3) Cost accounting for 
production management. Cost systems for internal con- 
trol, standard cost, inventory planning and control, capital 
budgeting; relationship between cost accounting and other 
quantitative areas; and other current cost topics are included. 
Prerequisites: 54 credit hours earned and SBAD 226. 

SBAD 335. Individual Tax Planning (3) Federal income 
tax law as it relates to planning individual transactions 
to minimize income taxes. Includes preparation of indi- 
vidual tax returns. Prerequisites: 54 credit hours earned 
and SBAD 226. 

SBAD 336. Fund Accounting (3) Principles and proce- 
dures of accounting for the various fiinds of governmental 
and institutional organizations and budgetary accounting 
for planning and controlling revenues and expenditures. 
Prerequisites: 54 credit hours earned and SBAD 225. 

SBAD 347. Legal Environment of Business (3) Legal 
system; crimes and torts; consumer law, anti-trust, labor 
and employment law; environment and insurance; contracts 
and agency; business ethics; and international matters. 
Prerequisite: 54 credit hours earned. 

SBAD 348. Issues in Commercial Law (3) Corporations, 
bankruptcy, and the Uniform Commercial Code. Prereq- 
uisites: 54 credit hours earned and SBAD 347. 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



167 



SBAD 350. Principles of Marketing (3) Exchange 
relationships between buyers and sellers in a dynamic 
global marketplace. Focus areas include: environmental 
analysis, marketing research, buyer behavior, market- 
ing strategy, business ethics, and the societal impacts of 
marketing activity of integrated marketing organizations. 
Prerequisite: 54 credit hours earned. 

SBAD 351. Consumer Behavior (3) Consumer deci- 
sion-making processes in a dynamic global marketplace. 
Selected concepts from psychology, sociology, economics, 
anthropology, and other behavioral disciplines are exam- 
ined to develop a managerial perspective on predicting and 
interpreting consumer responses to marketing strategies. 
Prerequisites: 54 credit hours earned and SBAD 350. 

SBAD 352. Marketing Communications (3) Selec- 
tion and implementation of promotional strategies in a 
dynamic global marketplace. Focus areas include: inte- 
grated marketing communication processes, psychological, 
sociological and cultural factors influencing promotion 
decision making. Prerequisites: 54 credit hours earned 
and SBAD 350. 

SBAD 363. Business Finance (3) Procurement and 
management of wealth by privately owned profit-seeking 
enterprises. Prerequisites: 54 credit hours earned, SBAD 
225andSEC0 291. 

SBAD 364. Financial Institutions and Markets (3) Fi- 
nancial institutions, various debt, equity, foreign exchange 
and derivative markets and instruments. Topics include 
security valuation, measures of risk, financial market 
innovation; the structure and role of commercial banks 
and other financial institutions, including types of risk 
financial institutions bear; utilization of financial markets, 
institutions, and instruments to manage risk. Prerequisite: 
54 credit hours earned, and SBAD 363. 

SBAD 365. Principles of Investments (3) The conceptual 
and analytical framework for formulating investment poli- 
cies. An overview of the traditional securities markets for 
stocks, bonds, options, and non-traditional investment such 
as financial futures, commodities, and international markets 
is emphasized. Prerequisite: 54 credit hours earned. 

SBAD 369. Personal Finance (3) Life insurance, health 
insurance, wills, trusts, social security, stocks, bonds, real 
estate, mutual funds, and other uses of funds. Prerequisite: 
54 credit hours earned. 

SBAD 371. Organizational Management and Behav- 
ior (3) Survey of functions of management and forms 
of organizational behavior demonstrated in all types of 
organizations, with a focus on group and individual dy- 
namics in organizations, quality, competitiveness and the 
global environment, and a heavy emphasis on managing 
workforce diversity including ethnic, cultural, and gender 
diversity. Prerequisite: 54 credit hours earned. 

SBAD 372. Operations Management (3) Managing the 
direct resources required by the firm to create value through 



the production of goods, services and information. There 
is a strong emphasis on supporting the decision-making 
process throughout organizations with quantitative tools 
and techniques. Topics include process selection, quality 
tools, inventory management techniques and supply chain 
management. Prerequisites: 54 credit hours earned, SECO 
291 and SMTH 121 or equivalent. 

SBAD 374. Management of Human Resources (3) A 

line and staff function utilizing modem-day concepts and 
practices. Topics include: employment, training, employee 
services, compensation, industrial relations, and legal 
constraints. Prerequisite: 54 credit hours earned. 

SBAD 377. Advanced Organizational Behavior (3) The 

study of the impact of individuals, groups and structure on 
behavior in a business organization in order to improve 
organizational performance. Prerequisites: 54 credit hours 
earned, and SBAD 371. 

SBAD 378. The International Business Enterprise (3) 

The multinational firm: its development, organization, 
management, differentiation from domestically oriented 
finns, and its future. Prerequisites: 54 credit hours earned 
and SBAD 371. A foreign language course is strongly 
recommended. 

SBAD 390. Business Technology and Information Sys- 
tems (3) Development, use and management of business 
information systems. Topics include information systems 
for business operations, management infomiation and 
decision support systems, information systems develop- 
ment, issues and challenges relating to global information 
systems and technology including security and ethics. 
Prerequisites: 54 credit hours earned, SBAD 290 or SCSC 
300 or SIMS 201. 

SBAD 398. Topics in Metropolitan Business Studies 

(3) Intensive study in contemporary areas of business such 
as corporate responsibility, cultural diversity and ethics. 
Topics are selected to meet current industry, faculty and 
student interest. Experiential learning is emphasized. May 
be repeated with permission of advisor. Prerequisite: 54 
credit hours earned and SBAD 371. 

SBAD 399. Independent Study (1-6) Prerequisite: 54 
credit hours earned. 

SBAD 432. Advanced Federal Income Tax (3) Estates 
and taists, partnerships, corporations, foreign income, gift, 
and social security taxes. Prerequisite: SBAD 335. 

SBAD 433. AccountingControl Systems (3) Skills, tools 
and procedures needed to evaluate EDPcontrols. Program, 
system and business level controls are presented to show 
how the accounting, ethical and legal considerations should 
be integrated into the design of business accounting and 
auditing systems. Prerequisites: (SBAD 331 or SBAD 
333) and (SBAD 290 or SIMS 201 ). 

SBAD 435. Auditing (3) Effectiveness of internal control 
systems, ethics, legal liability, the auditing of information 



168 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



processing systems, the audit application of statistical 
sampling, and the reporting function of the independent 
auditor are examined. Prerequisites: SECO 292, SBAD 
332; Prerequisite or Corequisite: SBAD 433. 

SBAD 437. Advanced Accounting (3) Accounting for 
business combinations, consolidated financial statements, 
governmental entities, and not-for-profit organizations. 
Prerequisites: SBAD 332. 

SBAD 452. International Marketing (3) Selection of 
markets and the development of marketing strategy in a 
dynamic global marketplace. The influences of differ- 
ent demographic, political, legal, cultural, competitive 
economic, technological, and natural environments are 
highlighted in order to conduct business across political 
borders. Prerequisites: SBAD 350. 

SBAD 456. Business Marketing (3) Industrial, govern- 
mental, and non-for-profit sector markets as distinguished 
from personal household consumption. The methods used 
by marketers to create marketing strategies throughout an 
integrated supply-chain in a dynamic global marketplace. 
Prerequisites: SBAD 350. 

SBAD 457. Marketing Research (3) Research methods 
and procedures used in the marketing process. Particular 
emphasis is given to the sources of market data, sampling, 
preparation of questionnaires, collection and interpretation 
of data and the relation of market research to the policies 
and ftmctions of the business enterprise. Emphasis is placed 
upon differences in life-style, beliefs and attitudes, and 
their influences upon the marketing decisions of the firm. 
Prerequisites: SBAD 350 and SECO 291 or equivalent. 

SBAD 458. Marketing Management (3) Strategic market- 
ing decision-making in integrated organizations competing 
in the dynamic global marketplace. Focus areas include: 
the policy areas of an organization, marketing research, 
marketing strategy, buyer behavior, forecasting, cost and 
profit analysis, and total quality management. Prerequisite: 
54 credit hours earned and SBAD 350, 351 and 352. 

SBAD 459. Personal Selling and Sales Management 

(3) Development of personal selling skills and manage- 
ment of sales function. Focus areas include: preparation, 
prospecting, interviewing, trial closes, handling objec- 
tions, closing after-sales support, recruitment, selection, 
motivation, training, and development, compensation, 
supervision, and other managerial topics. Prerequisites: 
SBAD 350. 

SBAD 461. International Business Finance (3) Finan- 
cial management of a multinational business enterprise. 
Topics include subsidiary working capital management, 
financial analysis of overseas ventures, sources of inter- 
national capital, funds remittance policies, trade finance, 
exchange risk management policies, and techniques of 
financial control. Prerequisite: SBAD 363. 

SBAD 471. New Business Enterprise (3) Analysis of 
business opportunities; planning and establishing a busi- 



ness organization to exploit an opportunity; management 
of a small business. Prerequisite: SBAD 371. 

SBAD 475. Advanced Operations Management (3) 

Theory and application of contemporary methods of man- 
aging operations. Topics may include forecasting, master 
planning, advanced supply chain management, project 
management, facility location factors, and competitive 
strategies in a global market. Prerequisite: SBAD 372. 

SBAD 476. Statistical Process Control (3) Basic statisti- 
cal process control and process capability improvement 
procedures in the framework of the Deming management 
philosophy. Prerequisites: 54 credit hours earned, SECO 
292 or equivalent. 

SBAD 478. Business Policy (3) Multifunctional approach 
to the study of organizational problems and opportunities. 
Knowledge gained in previous courses is applied to the 
functions of an organization through use of strategies, 
objectives, policies, technology, environment, systems, 
ethics, and decision making. Requirements include indi- 
vidual research accompanied by written and oral presen- 
tations. Prerequisites: Senior standing and all SBAD and 
SECO core courses. 

SBAD 499. Business Internship (1-6) Supervised work 
experience in the business environment resulting in a 
meaningful product for the employing firm and a schol- 
arly project for the student. A minimum of 42 hours of 
scheduled work per one hour of academic credit, periodic 
class meetings, and individual consultation with the in- 
structor is required. A contractual agreement signed by 
the employer, the student, the instructor, and the dean 
is mandatory. Prerequisite; 54 credit hours earned — A 
student must have earned a minimum of 36 credit hours in 
business and economics courses and have an overall GPA 
of 2. 5 or higher or a 2.5 GPA on twelve or more hours for 
the previous semester. Pass/fail credit. 



Chemistry (SCHM) 

Note: Occupational Safety and Health Administra- 
tion (OSHA) regulations require that everyone who enters 
chemistiy laboratories wear safety goggles. 

SCHM 101. Fundamental Chemistry I (4) Survey of 
inorganic and solution chemistry. Non-science majors 
only. Three class, one recitation, and two laboratory 
hours per week. 

SCHM 102. Fundamental Chemistry II (4) Survey of 
organic and biochemistry. Non-science majors only. Three 
class, one recitation, and two laboratory hours per week. 
Prerequisite: SCHM 101 or 111. 

SCHM 105, 106. Chemistry and Society I and II (3,3) 

Survey of chemistry and its impact on technology, the 
environment, modem life, and thought. Need not be 
taken in sequence. Non-science majors only. (SCHM 107 
laboratory is available for additional credit.) 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



169 



SCHM 107L. Chemistry and Society Laboratory (1) 

Three laboratory hours perweek. Prerequisite or corequisite: 
SCHM 105 or 106. (Credit may be earned only once.) 

SCHM 109. Chemistry of Living Things (4) Chemical 
principles of including the structure of and energy asso- 
ciated with matter; quantitative kinetic and equilibrium 
analysis of chemical and physical processes. The structure 
and ftinction of biological macromolecules and the molecu- 
lar basis of inheritance are surveyed. Non-science majors 
only. Three lecture, one recitation, and two laboratory 
hours perweek. Prerequisite: SMTH 120 or higher, except 
statistics, or higher placement in SMTH. Prerequisite or 
corequisite: SCSC 138 or consent of instructor. 

SCHM in. General Chemistry (4) Chemical principles 
with emphasis on stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, 
and molecular structure. Three class, one recitation, and 
two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite or corequi- 
site: SMTH 121 or higher, except statistics or consent of 
instructor. 

SCHM 112. General Chemistry and Qualitative 
Analysis (4) Chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, 
oxidation-reduction, and inorganic qualitative analysis. 
Three class, one recitation, and three laboratory hours per 
week. Prerequisites: SCHM 111. 

SCHM 321. Quantitative Analysis (3) Principles of 
gravimetric, volumetric, and basic instrumental methods 
of analysis. Three class hours per week. Prerequisite: 
SCHM 112. 

SCHM 321L. Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (1) 

Practice of volumetric, gravimetric, and simple instru- 
mental methods of analysis. Three laboratory hours per 
week. Corequisite: SCHM 321. 

SCHM 331, 332. Organic Chemistry (3,3) Nomencla- 
ture, reactions, and syntheses of carbon compounds with 
emphasis on reaction mechanisms. Three class hours and 
one recitation hour per week. Prerequisite for 33 1 : SCHM 
112 or consent of instructor. Prerequisite or corequisite 
for 332: SCHM 331. 

SCHM 33 1 L, 332L. Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1,1) 

A survey of laboratory methods of organic chemistry. Three 
laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite or corequisite for 
33 IL: SCHM 331. Prerequisites for332L; SCHM 331 Land 
SCHM 332 or concurrent enrollment in SCHM 332. 

SCHM 395. Internship in Chemistry (1-3) Supei-vised 
work experience in chemistry. A minimum of three hours 
per week is required for each credit hour. A required con- 
tractual agreement is signed by the supervisor, the student, 
the instructor, and division chair. Prerequisite: junior or 
senior standing. Pass/fail credit. 

SCHM 397. Junior Seminar (1) Searching and reading 
chemical literature and presentation of papers in a jour- 
nal club format. Class meets with the chemistry Senior 
Seminar (SCHM 599) and presentations by SCHM 599 



students will be observed. Prerequisite: SCHM 33 1 , 33 1 L. 
Corequisite: SCHM 321, 332, 332L. 

SCHM 499. Undergraduate Research (1-3) Directed 
research project introducing the student to the methods 
of chemical research. A written report on work accom- 
plished is required at the end of each semester. Research 
involves laboratory and/or library work as determined by 
the instructor. The student can sign up for 1 -3 hours of 
research each semester with a maximum of 9 hours total 
credits for undergraduate research. (Not for major credit). 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

SCHM 511. Inorganic Chemistry (3) Atomic structure, 
molecular orbital theory, coordination, compounds, redox 
chemistry, crystal structures, and a systematic study of the pe- 
riodic table. Prerequisites: SCHM 321 and SCHM 33 1 . 

SCHM 512L. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (1) 

Syntheses with high pressure reactions, the use of unfamil- 
iar solvents, high temperature and inert atmosphere, and 
the application of infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic 
resonance, and mass spectroscopy to inorganic chemistry. 
Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: SCHM 
33 1 L. Prerequisite or corequisite: SCHM 511. 

SCHM 522. Instrumental Methods of Analysis (4) 

Theory, instrumentation, and applications of modern 
instrumental techniques. Three class and three laboratory 
hours per week. Prerequisite: SCHM 32 1 . 

SCHM 530. Spectrometric Identification of Organic 
Compounds (3) Development and application of methods 
of obtaining and interpreting spectrometric data in terms 
of structural organic chemistry. Topics include infrared, 
ultraviolet, visible, and nuclear magnetic resonance 
spectroscopy. Prerequisite: SCHM 332 or consent of 
instructor. 

SCHM 534. Polymer Chemistry (3) Fundamentals of 
macromolecular science with an emphasis an synthesis 
and characterization. Prerequisite: SCHM 332. 

SCHM 541. Physical Chemistry I (3) Macroscopic sys- 
tems including thermodynamics and chemical equilibrium. 
Prerequisites: SCHM 321, SMTH 241 and SPHS 202. 
Co-registration in SPHS 212 is an alternative to having 
completed SPHS 202. 

SCHM 541L. Physical Chemistry I Laboratory (1) 

Applications of physical chemical techniques to thenno- 
dynamics, chemical equilibrium and chemical kinetics. 
Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: SCHM 
32 IL. Corequisite: SCHM 541. 

SCHM 542. Physical Chemistry II (3) Microscopic 
systems including quantum theory and its applications 
to electronic structure and spectroscopy. Prerequisite: 
SCHM 541. 

SCHM 542L. Physical Chemistry II Laboratory (1) Ap- 
plications of physical chemical techniques to quantum me- 



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chanics and spectroscopy. Three laboratory hours per week. 
Prerequisite: SCHM 541 L. Corequisite: SCHM 542. 

SCHM 581. Biochemistry I (3) (=SBIO 581) Structure 
and function of the major classes of biological compounds 
and biological membranes. Content includes a kinetic and 
equilibrium based approach to biological transport and 
catalysis, signaling, and an introduction to bioenergetics. 
Prerequisite: SCHM 332 or consent of instructor. 

SCHM 582. Biochemistry II (3) (=SBIO 582) Chemistry 
of biological information pathways. DNA, RNA, and pro- 
tein metabolism, organization of genes on chromosomes, 
regulation of gene expression, and applications of these 
topics to biotechnology problems are covered. Prerequisite: 
SBIO 541 /SCHM 581 or consent of instructor. 

SCHM 583L. Biochemistry Laboratory (1) (=SBIO 

583L) A survey of laboratory methods in biochemistiy. 
Three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite or coreq- 
uisite: SCHM 581 or 582. 

SCHM 599. Senior Seminar (3) Integration and as- 
sessment of chemical knowledge at an advanced level, 
exploration of ethical issues, research, and oral presenta- 
tion. Prerequisites: SSPH 201, SCHM 321, SCHM 332. 
SCHM 541 and one course from SCHM 511, 522, 530, 
534,581,582. 

Chinese (SCHI) 

SCHI 101. Introductory Chinese I (3) Fundamentals 
of the Mandarin Chinese language and culture through 
speaking, listening, reading and writing. 

SCHI 102. Introductory Chinese II (3) Fundamentals 
of the Mandarin Chinese language and culture through 
speaking, listening, reading and writing. Prerequisite: 
SCHI 101. 

Communication (SCOM) 



description for a total of no more than six hours of under- 
graduate credit. Prerequisites: SJOU 30 1,GPA2.0 overall, 
2.5 in major and consent of faculty supervisor. 

SCOM 490. Senior Seminar in Communications (3) 

Reading and research on selected topics in journalism, 
speech, and theatre designed to integrate knowledge, to 
explore ethical issues, and to gain experience in research 
and oral presentation. Prerequisite: SCOM 375. 



Computer Science (SCSC) 

SCSC 138. Introduction to Computer Technology (3) 

Introduction to graphical user interface, word processing, 
spreadsheet, database, Internet, cross-platform training, 
computer components and peripherals, input/output 
concepts, storage concepts, and computer buyer's guide 
considerations. 

SCSC 139. Visual BASIC Programming I (3) Visual user 
interface design, event-driven programming using controls, 
variables, constants, calculations, decision structures, loop 
control structures, arrays, creating menus. Prerequisites: 
SCSC 138 or SBAD 290 or consent of instructor. Not 
for Computer Science major credit. 

SCSC 150. Introduction to Computer Science (3) Cur- 
rent application, security and systems software, hardware 
devices, social and ethical issues in computing and infor- 
mation technology, propositional logic, search engines, 
and computer programming concepts. Basic problem 
solving, logic, and computer programming are introduced 
through an active learning environment. Prerequisite or 
Corequisite: SMTH 1 26 or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 200. Computer Science I (3) Design, analysis and 
testing of algorithms and classes, including programming 
from an Object-Oriented perspective, simple data types, 
control structures, arrays, file I/O, and complexity analy- 
sis. Prerequisite: C or better in SCSC 150 or consent of 
instructor. 



SCOM 375. Communication Research Methods (3) 

Fundamentals of communications research methods and 
applications. Topics include survey research, observational 
and experimental studies, primary research data-gathering 
techniques, secondary research sources, data analysis, 
message, market, competitive and audience research 
measures. Prerequisites: SJOU 301 and SSPH 301; or 
consent of the instructor. 

SCOM 399. Internship or Independent Study in Mass 
Communication (1-3) Superv ised professional experience 
of research outside of the classroom. For three intern- 
ship credit hours, a student is to work 135 hours with an 
approved agency; for two credit hours, 90 hours, for one 
credit, 45 hours. For an internship or for an independent 
study, a contract must be signed by the student and by 
the instructor of record and other designated faculty and 
administrators. A student may repeat SCOM 399 once 
with a difference internship or independent study contract 



SCSC 210. Computer Organization (3) Computer organi- 
zation, logic gates and expressions, circuits, CPU, memory, 
numbering systems, assembly language programming, 
instruction fonnats, and addressing modes. Prerequisite: 
C or better in SCSC 200 or consent of instructor 

SCSC 234. Visual BASIC Programming (3) Basic and 
advanced programming in the Visual BASIC language 
including visual object design, active-X objects, access 
to database objects, dynamic data exchange, and object 
linking and embedding. Prerequisite: C or better in SCSC 
200 or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 238. C++ Programming (3) Introduction to C++ 
as a second object-oriented language with concepts of 
OO programming, data abstraction, polymorphism, in- 
heritance, graphical user interface design with MFC, and 
memory management issues. Prerequisite: C or better in 
SCSC 200 or consent of instructor. 



Course Descriptions 
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171 



SCSC 239. Visual BASIC Programming II for Non- 
Majors (3) Modular programming, algorithmic design, 
string manipulation, array processing, sequential and 
random file processing in the BASIC language. Not for 
Computer Science major credit. Prerequisites: SCSC 139 
or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 300. Computer Science II (3) Advanced design, 
analysis and testing of algorithms and classes, including 
inheritance, polymorphism, UML. complexity analysis, 
recursion, search and sorting techniques, linked lists, 
stacks and queues. Prerequisite: C or better in SCSC 
200 or consent of instructor. Corequisite: SMTH 174 or 
consent of instructor. 

SCSC 310. Introduction to Computer Architecture (3) 

Computer organization and architecture, basic proces- 
sor design, hard wired and microprogrammed control, 
ALU. memory organization, data paths, pipelining, and 
interfacing and communications. Prerequisite: C or better 
in SCSC 210 or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 311. Information Systems Hardware and 
Software (3) An introduction to computer and systems 
architecture and operating systems for system development 
personnel. Topics include CPU architecture, instructions 
sets, memory, registers, input/output, and operating system 
modules such as process management, memory and file 
management. Prerequisite: C or better in SCSC 200 or 
consent of instructor. 

SCSC 314. Introduction to Robotics (3) Fundamental 
concepts of industrial robotics including kinematics, 3D 
coordinate transfomiation, robot motion, robot control 
and sensing, robot programming, and computer vision. 
A review of new technologies for computer-integrated 
manufacturing, computer-aided design and computer-aided 
manufacturing, automated material handling, and flexible 
manufacturing systems is included. Students are required 
to write programs in order to demonstrate the laboratory 
projects. Prerequisites: C or better in SCSC 200 and 
SMTH 127, or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 315. Networking Technology (3) Basic concepts 
of computer networks, data telecommunication and 
distributed applications, including network topology, 
hardware, software, protocol, security, and the implica- 
tions of network technologies on the deployment and 
implementation of networked systems. Not for CS or CIS 
major credit. Prerequisites: SCSC 300 or SIMS 305 or 
consent of instructor. 

SCSC 321. Computer Science III (3) Design, analysis 
and testing of advanced data structures, including prior- 
ity queues, trees, binary search trees, tree traversals and 
balancing techniques, hashing, and graph theory. Prereq- 
uisites: C or better in both SCSC 300 and SMTH 1 74 or 
consent of instructor. 

SCSC 325. Fundamentals of Relational Database 
Management Systems (3) Basic architecture, structures, 
and query languages. Topics include design and imple- 



mentation of RDBMS, relational data models, conceptual 
modeling, data independence, specification of data require- 
ments, normalization, recovery and security. Not for CS 
or CIS major credit. Prerequisites: SCSC 300 or SIMS 
305 or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 355. Digital Forensics (3) Methods, tools and tech- 
niques used to maximize efficiency in investigations that 
involve digital devices, including malicious code analysis, 
techniques of evaluation of the physical memory of a 
compromised machine, digital forensics tools, challenges 
of anti-forensics phenomena, and use and management 
of storage area network technology for evidence storage. 
Prerequisites: C or better in SCSC 300 and SCSC 311; 
or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 356. Cryptography (3) Historical and modern 
techniques of encryption and decryption, classical cryp- 
tosystems, public-key cryptosystems, authentication, ano- 
nymity, zero-knowledge protocols, smart cards and other 
everyday applications of cryptographic algorithms, prime 
numbers, elementary number theory and algorithms that 
support efficient arithmetic on large integers. Prerequisite: 
C or better in SCSC 300 or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 370. Fundamentals of Bioinformatics (3). Com- 
putational methods, tools and techniques used to analyze, 
correlate, and extract information from biological, chemi- 
cal and biomedical databases, including algorithms for 
sequence comparison, data mining for disease diagnosis, 
prediction of protein structure and function, and database 
management for biomedical data. Prerequisite: C or better 
in SCSC 321 or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 399. Independent Study (1-9) As needed. 

SCSC 412. Computer Networks I (3) Introduce the 
basic concepts needed to design, implement, and manage 
networks. Transmission media, topologies, local area and 
wide area network technologies, communication protocols, 
standards, network architectures, security, and network 
operating systems are examined. Prerequisite: Cor better 
in SCSC 300, or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 421. Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3) 

Concepts and fundamental strategies of algorithm design; 
the analysis of computing time and memory requirements; 
the theory of computational complexity (NP-hard and 
NP-complete); graph manipulation algorithms (connected 
components, minimum spanning trees, traveling salesman, 
cycles in a graph, and coloring of graphs); search algo- 
rithms (depth-first, breadth-first, best-first, and alpha-beta 
minimax ); and computational algorithms (matrix multipli- 
cation, systems of 1 inear equations, expression evaluation, 
and sorting). Prerequisite: C or better in SCSC 32 1 or 
consent of instructor. 

SCSC 440. Object Oriented Systems Analysis and 
Design (3) Analysis and design of information systems 
using object oriented methodologies. Emphasis is on 
effective communication and integration with users and 
usersystems, interpersonal skill development with clients. 



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Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



users, team members, and others associated with develop- 
ment, operation, and maintenance of the system, use of 
modeling tools, and adherence to methodological life-cycle 
and project management standards. Prerequisite: C or 
better in SCSC 300 or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 441. Experiential Learning in Computer Science 

(3) Experience in a business, educational, or non-profit 
computing environment. May not be used for major credit 
in any major in computer science. Prerequisite: approval 
of the instructor. Pass/fail credit. 

SCSC 450. E-Business Web Application Development 

(3) A project-oriented course involving the complete 
application development of an online commercial Web 
site. Basic Web page design, including HTML and Style 
Sheets is covered, but the focus is on what happens behind 
the scenes of a business Web site, including client versus 
server-side information processing, CGI and Event-Driven 
programming, data transmission, storage and compres- 
sions, risk analysis, and security issues. Prerequisite: C 
or better in SCSC 300 or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 455. Computer Security (3) A survey of the 
fundamentals of information security, including risks and 
vulnerabilities, policy formation, controls and protection 
methods, database security, encryption, authentication 
technologies, host-based and network-based security 
issues, personnel and physical security issues, issues of 
law and privacy. Prerequisite; C or better in SCSC 300 
or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 499. Directed Research (3) An investigation of 
technical papers from the instructor's area of research. 
The composition and presentation of technical papers that 
either survey the existing literature or make an original 
contribution to the research area is required. Prerequisites: 
C or better in SCSC 300 or consent of instructor. 



SCSC 515. Wireless Networks (3) Fundamental concepts 
and techniques employed in wireless and mobile networks 
such as cellular networks, wireless LANs, and ad-hoc 
networks. Topics include wireless communication basics, 
access technologies, medium access control, naming and 
addressing, routing, mobility support and management, 
security, and power management. Prerequisite: C or 
better in SCSC 412 or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 516. Distributed and Network Programming 

(3) Design and implementation of distributed applica- 
tion and network communication programs, including 
network application development with UCP and TCP/IP 
protocols, introduction to distributed systems and com- 
puting , RIM, socket programming, client/server models, 
and communication primitives, such as datagrams, packet 
retransmission, routing, addressing, error handling, and 
flow control. Prerequisite: C or better in SCSC 321 or 
consent of the instructor. 

SCSC 520. Database System Design (3) Database 
Management System (DBMS ) architecture and organiza- 
tion, design and implementation of DBMS, data models, 
internal databases structures, conceptual modeling, data 
independence, data definition language, data manipulation 
language, normalization, transaction processing, recovery, 
and security. Prerequisite: C or better in SCSC 300 or 
consent of instructor. 

SCSC 521. Database Implementation, Application, 
and Administration (3) Design and implementation of 
database and client/server applications, in-depth treatments 
of embedded queries and stored procedures, database 
triggers, database extended languages, architectures and 
design patterns of distributed application, transaction 
processing, performance tuning, recovery and backups, 
auditing, and security. Prerequisite: C or better in SCSC 
520 or consent of instructor. 



SCSC 509. Topics in Computer Science (3) Selected 
topics of special interest in computer science. May be 
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

SCSC 511. Operating Systems (3) Introduces the funda- 
mentals of operating systems design and implementation, 
including an overview of the components of an operating 
system, mutual exclusion and synchronization, I/O, inter- 
rupts, implementation of processes, scheduling algorithms, 
memory management, and file systems. Prerequisites: 
C or better in SCSC 210 and SCSC 321 or consent or 
instructor. 

SCSC 512. Computer Networks II (3) Advanced topics 
in telecommunications, location positioning systems and 
computer networking, including wireless and mobile com- 
puting, integration of wireless and wired networks, design 
issues, packet transmission, datagram encapsulation and 
fragmentation, media access control, data transmission and 
retransmission, routing, bridging, switching, addressing 
error handling, flow control, data security, and local and 
wide-area networks. Prerequisites: C or better in SCSC 
412 or consent of instructor. 



SCSC 525. Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining 

(3) Extraction and discovery of knowledge from large 
databases, data integration and data warehousing, data 
mining algorithms, models, and applications including 
association rule mining information retrieve (IR) and 
mining of text databases, decision tree, decision rules, 
classification techniques, cluster analysis, and evaluation, 
visualization, and interpretation of patterns. Prerequisite: 
C or better in SCSC 300 or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 530. Programming Language Structures (3) 

Paradigms and fundamental concepts of programming 
languages, such as scope, binding, abstraction, encap- 
sulation, typing, and language syntax and semantics. 
Functional and logic programming paradigms are also 
introduced through sample programming languages. 
Prerequisites: C or better in SCSC 210 and SCSC 321 
or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 540. Software Engineering (3) Methods and tools 
of software engineering, software life cycle, specification 
and design of software, software testing, cost and effort 
estimation, project management, risk analysis, and docu- 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



173 



mentation. Arelatively large software system is developed 
in a team environment. Prerequisite: C or better in SCSC 
321 or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 555. Advanced Computer Security and Informa- 
tion Assurance (3) Cry'ptography, telecommunication and 
network security, applications and system development 
security. Business Continuity Planning (BCP). cyber- 
crimes and countenneasures. The hands-on laboratories 
provide extensive practices on firewalls. Virtual Private 
Networks (VPN). Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), and 
other computer security tools. Prerequisite: Cor better in 
SCSC 412 and SCSC 455: or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 560. Numerical Analysis (3) (=SMTH 560) Differ- 
ence calculus, direct and interactive techniques for matrix 
inversion, eigen value problems, numerical solutions of 
initial value problems in ordinary differential equations, 
stability, error analysis, and laboratory applications. 
Prerequisites: SMTH 245 and 344, and programming 
competency. 

SCSC 580. Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3) 

Intelligent agents, expert systems, heuristic searching, 
knowledge representation and reasoning, artificial neural 
networks, ontologies, and natural language processing. 
Prerequisite: C or better in SCSC 321 or consent of 
instructor. 

SCSC 585. Introduction to Computer Vision (3) Process- 
ing and analyzing features in still digital images, camera 
calibration, stereopsis, object recognition, the processing 
of edges, regions, shading and texture, and introductory 
video processing techniques. Prerequisites: C or better in 
SCSC 321 and SMTH 141 or consent of instructor. 

SCSC 599. Computer Science Senior Seminar (3) Integra- 
tion of knowledge at an advanced level, a review of recent 
developments in theoretical and applied computer science, 
the exploration of ethical issues, along with research and oral 
presentation. Prerequisites: 12 hours of 300 level or above 
computer science courses and consent of instructor. 



Criminal Justice (SCRJ) 

Note: Criminal Justice 101 or Sociology 101 is a 
prerequisite to all other criminal justice courses. 

SCRJ 101. Introduction to Criminal Justice (3) Survey 
ofthe law enforcement. judicial, correctional, andjuvenile 
systems; interrelationships between criminal justice agen- 
cies and the community. 

SCRJ 210. Policing in America (3) Police organizations; 
the recruitment, training, and socialization of police of- 
ficers; the role of police in society; and critical issues in 
policing. The problem of coercive power as it relates to 
policing is also examined. Prerequisite: SCR.I 101. 

SCRJ 220. The Criminal Courts (3) The administration 
of criminal justice in the American federal and state court 
systems. The nature and concept of j ustice. court personnel . 



fiinctions, jurisdictions, policies, procedures, discretion, 
and current developments in court technology and orga- 
nization will be reviewed. Prerequisite: SCRJ 101. 

SCRJ 230. Introduction to Corrections (3) Penology 
emphasizing the history, philosophy, programs, policies, 
and problems associated with correctional practice. Top- 
ics include probation, prisons, jails, parole, community 
corrections and alternative sanctions. Prerequisite: SCRJ 
101 orSSOC 101. 

SCRJ 301 . Crime in America (3) Manifestations of crime, 
its victims, societal control strategies, correlates, and the 
collection and use of criminal statistics. Prerequisite; SCRJ 
101 orSSOC 101. 

SCRJ 317. Policing: Theories and Programs (3) The 

development of police organizational theories, practices 
and methods from the turn ofthe twentieth century to the 
twenty-first century. Major emphasis is on development 
and implementation of new programs and application to 
urban policing. Prerequisite: SCRJ 210. 

SCRJ 321. Criminal Law (3) Origin and development of 
criminal law in America along with basic elements of crime 
and defenses. Prerequisite: SCRJ 101 orSSOC 101. 

SCRJ 325. Criminal Trial Practice (3) The criminal 
trial, including the rules of evidence, trial strategy, open- 
ing statements, the presentation of evidence, arguing 
objections, closing arguments, and a critical analysis of 
the entire process. Prerequisites: SCRJ 101 or consent 
of instructor. 

SCRJ 330. Institutional Corrections (3) Functions, 
structure, procedures and philosophy of American cor- 
rectional institutions; constitutional limitations and the 
impact of law on correctional practices. Prerequisite: 
SCRJ 101 orSSOC 101. 

SCRJ 333. Community-Based Corrections (3) Devel- 
opment and impact of community programs, halfway 
houses, group homes, work-release, and educational re- 
lease programs, including the role ofthe community and 
citizens in the correctional process. Prerequisite: SCRJ 
101 orSSOC 101. 

SCRJ 343. The Juvenile Justice System (3) History, 
philosophy, and evaluation of the juvenile court, juvenile 
court practices and procedures; the role of the police, 
correctional alternatives, prevention and intervention 
strategies in the juvenile justice process. Prerequisite: 
SCRJ 210, SCRJ 220. SCRJ 230. 

SCRJ 345. Juvenile Delinquency (3) (=SSOC 355) Social 
factors in the development, identification and treatments 
of delinquents andjuvenile delinquency in the context of 
juvenile justice systems. Prerequisite: SSOC 101. 

SCRJ 350. Victimology (3) Forms of victimization, the 
role of victims in crimes, their treatment by the criminal 
justice system, their decisions to report crimes and help 



174 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



prosecute offenders, victim-offender mediation, and 
victim compensation. The national crime survey regard- 
ing patterns and trends in victimization is introduced. 
Prerequisite: SCRJ 101. 

SCRJ 361. Criminal Jusrice Research Methods (3) 

Quantitative, qualitative and comparative methods used in 
criminal j ustice research, focusing on research design, data 
collection and analysis, and ethical issues. Prerequisites: 
SCRJ 210, SCRJ 220 and SCRJ 230. 

SCRJ 371. Theories of Crime (3) Analysis and critical 
assessments of traditional and contemporary crime and 
theories of criminal behavior. Prerequisites: SCRJ 210, 
SCRJ 220. SCRJ 230 and SSOC 101. 

SCRJ 380. Minorities, Crime, and Criminal Justice 

(3) The involvement of minorities in crime and in the 
criminal justice system: theory, social policy, and effects. 
Prerequisite: SCRJ 101 or SSOC 101. 

SCRJ381.Alcohol,Drugs,and Public Policy (3)History 

and theories of alcohol and other drug use. types and ef- 
fects of drugs, crime associated with drugs, prevention and 
treatment of abuse, and efforts to control and regulate drug 
use. Both past and present public policies for the control 
of licit and illicit drugs will be evaluated. Prerequisite: 
SCRJ lOl.SPSY 101 or SSOC 101. 

SCRJ 382. Women and Crime (3) The traditional and 
contemporary explanations of female delinquency and 
criminality, the differential treatment accorded female 
defendants and victims, the nature of crime against w omen, 
the quality of state and federal correctional systems for 
women, and the status of females as criminal justice pro- 
fessionals. Prerequisite: SCRJ 101 or SSOC 101. 

SCRJ 383. Comparative Criminal Justice Systems (3) 

International criminal justice systems, their legal founda- 
tions, current structures, and strategies of crime control. 
Prerequisite: SCRJ 101. 

SCRJ 391. Criminal Justice Field Study (3) History, 
jurisdiction, and departmental interaction between various 
law enforcement, correctional, legislative, and judicial 
agencies, involving travel to a major metropolitan city. 
Course may be taken twice if the city is different. 

SCRJ 399. Independent Study (3) A planned individual 
study program in conjunction with a Criminal Justice 
faculty member. Course may be repeated once with the 
consent of the advisor. Prerequisite: SCRJ 101 or consent 
of instructor. 



types of actions, defenses, damages, injunctions and 
other remedies for civil wrongs as mandated by state and 
federal law are included. Prerequisites: SCRJ 210, SCRJ 
220, SCRJ 230. 

SCRJ 420. Criminal Procedure (3) Police investigation 
through the adversarial system and sentencing. Prereq- 
uisite: SCRJ 101. 

SCRJ 474. Social Deviance (3) (=SSOC 351) Theories, 
methods, and substantive issues in the creation, involve- 
ment, recognition, and control of deviance. Sociological 
theories and pertinent research data are integrated in the 
context of contemporary societal issues. Prerequisite: 
SSOC 101. 

SCRJ 484. Selected Current Topics (3) A seminar for 
advanced students. May be repeated once with the consent 
of the adviser. Prerequisites: SCRJ 210. SCRJ 220. and 
SCRJ 230; or consent of instructor. 

SCRJ 490. Criminal Justice Internship (3-6) A planned 
program of obser\ at ion. study and w ork in selected criminal 
justice and related agencies. The purpose is to broaden 
the educational experience of seniors by giving them an 
opportunity to work w ith practitioners in the field. Prereq- 
uisites; SCRJ 2 1 0. SCRJ 220 and SCRJ 230; minimum of 
75 hours w ith at least 1 5 of these hours from USC Upstate, 
mimimum GPA of 2.25 and consent of instructor. 

SCRJ 501. SeniorSeminar(3) Exploration, atan advanced 
level, of issues, topics and dilemmas related to crime and 
the criminal justice system. The specific topics covered 
vary depending upon the instructor. Prerequisites: One 
statistics course, SCRJ 210, SCRJ 220, SCRJ 230, SCRJ 
361, SCRJ 371 and SSOC 101. 



Economics (SECO) 

SECO 221. Principles of Macroeconomics (3) Causes 
and effects of changes in economic aggregates, including 
gross domestic product, personal income, unemployment, 
and inflation. The role of economics in contemporary 
society and the effect of monetary and fiscal policy on 
the functioning of a free market system are explored. 
Prerequisite: SMTH 120 or 121 or 126. 

SECO 222. Principles of Microeconomics (3) Consumer 
demand, supply, and price in a free-market system. The 
economics of the firm is presented within the context of 
different market structures. Prerequisite: SMTH 120 or 
121 or 126. 



SCRJ 401. Criminal Justice Management and Organi- 
zation (3) Problems, processes, and theories of commu- 
nication, decision making, and control in criminal justice 
agencies. Prerequisite: SCRJ 101 or SSOC 101. 

SCRJ 402. Civil Liabilitv in Criminal Justice (3) 

Liability of criminal justice practitioners, agencies, mu- 
nicipalities, and other criminal justice entities including 



SECO 291. Probability and Statistics (3) Concepts of 
probability, probability distributions, and sampling theory. 
Prerequisite: SMTH 121. 

SECO 292. Statistical Inference (3) Methods of statisti- 
cal inference, including additional topics in hypothesis 
testing, linear statistical models, and time series analysis. 
Prerequisite: SMTH 122 and SECO 291. 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



175 



Note: Students seeking a degree in business must be 
admitted to the Professional Program (Upper Divi- 
sion) before enrolling in 300-level and above business 
administration and economics courses. Students not 
majoring in business must have 54 credit hours earned 
to take 300-level and above business administration and 
economics courses. A dditional prerequisites are included 
in individual course descriptions. Students not majoring 
in business can enroll in no more than 29 semester hours 
of Johnson College of Business and Economics courses, 
excluding SECO 221, 222, 291, and 292. 

SECO 301 . Commercial and Central Banking (3) History, 
structure, functions and operations of the American com- 
mercial and central banking system. Emphasis is placed on 
the influence and operations of the Federal Reserve System. 
Prerequisites: 54 credit hours earned and SECO 221 . 

SECO 303. International Economics (3) Survey of inter- 
national economic issues and institutions, including trade 
and protectionism, global and regional trade agreements, 
trade balances and exchange rates. Prerequisites: 54 credit 
hours earned. SECO 221 and 222. 

SECO 311. Issues in Economics (3) Nature and causes of 
major economic problems facing the nation and its com- 
munities and policy alternatives designed to solve them, 
including the philosophy and methodology of economics 
in social problem solving. Prerequisites: 54 credit hours 
earned. SECO 22 land 222. 

SECO 321. Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3)The 
operation of the price system and its role in understanding the 
behavior of individual economic units, specifically consum- 
ers, producers, and suppliers of resources. Prerequisites: 
54 credit hours earned and SECO 222. 

SECO 322. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3) 

Classical, Keynesian, and post-Keynesian models. These 
models provide a framework for monetary and fiscal policy 
prescriptions to economic problems. Prerequisites: 54 
credit hours earned and SECO 22 1 . 

SECO 326. Managerial Economics (3) Application of 
the economic theory of profits, competition, demand, and 
costs to the analysis of problems arising in the finn and in 
decision making. Price policies, forecasting, and investment 
decisions are among the topics considered. Prerequisites: 54 
credit hours earned, SECO 222 and 292 or equivalent. 

SECO 499. Topics in Economics (3) Selected topics in 
economics. Topics vary depending on available staff and 
interests of students. This course may be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisites: 54 credit hours earned, SECO 221 and 222. 



Education 

Curriculum and Instruction (SEDC) 

SEDC 300. Resources and Technology in Teaching 

(3) Proper and effective use of computer technology and 
audiovisual resources in education, including navigation 



of portfolio software, construction of materials, location 
of resources, and operation of equipment. Prerequisite: 
SCSC 138 or consent of the instructor 

Early Childhood Education (SEDE) 

SEDE 398. Topics in Early Childhood Education (1-3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing and consent of instructor 

SEDE 399. Independent Study (3) Prerequisite: junior 
standing and consent of instructor 

SEDE 41 0. Clinical I in Early Childhood Education (2) 

Supervised clinical experience in early childhood settings. 
Observation and participation in classroom settings is 
required with a focus on observing children's develop- 
ment and language use, observing types of programs, and 
assessing management styles and techniques. Seminars 
and group discussions included. Four laboratory hours 
per week. Prerequisite: admission to the professional 
program. Corequisite: SEDE 420, 422, 424, 445 and 
SEDF485. 

SEDE 420. The Young Child: Behavior and Develop- 
ment in Early Childhood (3) Intellectual, physical, 
social, and emotional development, prenatal through 
grade four, within ecological context. Critical thinking, 
creative expression, the parenting role and developmental 
diagnosis including assessment of development, normal 
and abnormal, will be addressed. Prerequisites: SEDF 333 
or SPSY 302; admission to the professional program or 
consent of the instructor. Corequisites: SEDE 410, 422, 
424, 445 and SEDF 485. 

SEDE 422. Survey of Early Childhood Education (3) 

Programs for young children and the historical, social, eco- 
nomic, and philosophical influences on education. Attention 
is given to learning activities, materials, and equipment for 
kindergarten and primary grades. The assessment of readi- 
ness and maturation and the relationship of various subject 
areas to the child's development are emphasized. Prerequi- 
site: admission to the professional program. Corequisites: 
SEDE 410, 420, 424, 445 and SEDF 485. 

SEDE 424. Parent and Family Involvement in Early 
Childhood Education (3). Principles, practices, and con- 
tent of family dynamics including practices for evolving 
parents in early childhood settings. Corequisites: SEDE 
410, 420, 422, 445 and SEDF 485. 

SEDE 440. Clinical II in Early Childhood Education 

(2) Supervised clinical experience in early childhood set- 
tings. Observation and participation in classroom settings 
is required with a focus on math, science, reading, social 
studies and creative arts. Seminars and group discussions 
included. Four laboratory hours per week required. Pre- 
requisite: admission to the professional program. Coreq- 
uisites: SEDR 414, SEDE 446, 447. 448 and 449. 

SEDE 445. Language Development and Communica- 
tive Skill (3) The relationship of language development 
and thinking to teaching the communicative skills to 



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Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



young children. Included are activities designed to develop 
oral language facility, writing (handwriting, spelling, 
functional, and creative writing), listening, and specific 
techniques dealing with diagnosis of language develop- 
ment. Students participate in a field based experience 
at a selected school site. Prerequisite: admission to the 
professional program. Corequisites: SEDR 414, SEDE 
410, 420, 422, 424 and SEDF 485. 

SEDE 446. Math for the Young Child (3) Materials and 
programs for teaching mathematics and the methods and 
theories for developing mathematics programs. Compe- 
tence is gained in the selection, preparation, and presenta- 
tion of materials. Prerequisite: SMTH 231, SMTH 232, 
SMTH 233 and admission to the professional program. 
Corequisites: SEDR 414, SEDE 440, 447, 448 and 449. 

SEDE 447. Social Studies for the Young Child (3) The 

selection, appropriate utilization, facilitation of develop- 
ment, and application of social science concepts to social 
problems and the socialization of children. Prerequisite: 
admission to the professional program. Corequisites: 
SEDR 414, SEDE 440, 446, 448 and 449. 

SEDE 448. Science for the Young Child (3) Materials and 
programs for teaching science and the methods and theories 
of developing science programs. Competence is gained in 
the selection, preparation, and presentation of materials. 
Prerequisite: admission to the professional program. Coreq- 
uisite: SEDR 414, SEDE 440, 446, 447 and 449. 

SEDE 449. Creativity and Play (3) Theories of play and 
the development of play as central to children's learn- 
ing. Knowledge and skills in structuring the classroom 
environment and curriculum experiences which will 
support and enrich a child's social, creative, and physical 
development in preprimary and primary school settings 
will be acquired. Multicultural perspectives and needs of 
exceptional children addressed. Prerequisite: admission 
to the professional program. Corequisites: SEDR 414, 
SEDE 440, 446,447 and 448. 

SEDE 468. Education of Young Children: An Ecologi- 
cal Approach (3) An ecological study with emphasis on 
home-school relations, parent involvement, and commu- 
nity resources. Multicultural perspectives and needs of 
exceptional children are addressed. Prerequisite: admission 
to the professional program. Corequisite: SEDE 469. 

SEDE 469. Directed Teaching in Early Childhood Edu- 
cation (12) A supervised clinical experience, consisting of 
14 weeks in an early childhood grades (4K-3 ) placement in 
a public school. This experience includes an exploration 
of legal and ethical issues, research through analysis and 
evaluation of teaching, and completion of a professional 
portfolio. Prerequisite: approved application for directed 
teaching. Corequisite: SEDE 468. Pass/fail credit. 

Elementary Education (SEDL) 

SEDL398. Topics in Elementary Education (1-3) Pre- 
requisites: junior standing and consent of instructor. 



SEDL 399. Independent Study (3) Prerequisites: junior 
standing and consent of instructor. 

SEDL441 . Elementary School Curriculum and Organi- 
zation (3) The entire school program, including grouping, 
grading, placement, and organization of both the children 
and the school for optimal learning. Prerequisite: admis- 
sion to the professional program. Corequisites: SEDF 487, 
SEDL 447, SEDL 450, SEDL 455, SEDR 442. 

SEDL 446. Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary 
School (3) Materials, resources, programs and methods 
for teaching mathematics in grades 2-6. Included are 
supervised practicum experiences which promote reflec- 
tive teaching in elementary school settings. Prerequisites: 
admission to the professional program and SMTH 231, 
SMTH 232, SMTH 233, SEDL44 1 , SEDL447, SEDF487, 
SEDL 450, SEDL 455, SEDR 442. Corequisites: SEDL 
448, SEDF 483, SEDL 460, SEDR 443, SEDR 444. 

SEDL 447. Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary 
School (3) Materials, resources, programs, and methods 
for teaching social studies in grades 2-6. Included are 
supervised practicum experiences which promote reflective 
teaching in elementary school settings. Prerequisites: ad- 
mission to the professional program. Corequisites; SEDL 
44 1 , SEDF 487, SEDL 450, SEDL 455, SEDR 442. 

SEDL 448. Teaching Science in the Elementary School 

(3) Materials, resources, programs, and methods for 
teaching science in grades 2-6. Included are supervised 
practicum experiences which promote reflective teaching 
in elementary school settings. Prerequisites: admission to 
the professional program, SEDL 441, SEDL 447, SEDF 
487, SEDL 450, SEDL 455, SEDR 442. Corequisites: 
SEDL 460, SEDF 483, SEDR 443, SEDR 444. 

SEDL 450. Fine Arts in the Elementary School Cur- 
riculum (3) Exploring both contecnt and methods for 
enriching all subject areas in the elementary classroom 
through the visual arts, drama, dance/movement, and 
music. Prerequisites: admission to the professional pro- 
gram. Corequisites: SEDL 441, SEDF 487, SEDL 447, 
SEDL 455, SEDR 442. 

SEDL 455. Clinical 1 in Elementary Education (2) 

Supervised clinical experience in elementary settings. 
Observation and participation in diverse classroom set- 
tings is required with a focus on observation of students 
and teachers, analysis of classroom organization and 
management, use of technology to enhance learning, 
and implementation of lessons. Seminars and group 
discussions included. Four laboratory hours per week. 
Prerequisites: admission to the professional program. 
Corequisites: SEDL 441, SEDF 487, SEDL 447, SEDL 
450, SEDR 442. 

SEDL 460. Clinical II in Elementary Education (2) 

Supervised clinical experience in elementary settings. 
Requires assessment of K- 1 2 students with interpretation 
of assessments, lesson planning based on assessments, 
implementation of lessons in science, math, and literacy 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



177 



with attention to reading and writing in the content areas. 
Reflections on teaching and K-12 student learning ex- 
plored in group discussions and seminars. Four laboratory 
hours per week required. Prerequisites: admission to teh 
professional program. SEDL 44 1 , SEDL 447, SEDF 487, 
SEDL 450, SEDL 455, SEDR 442. Corequisites: SEDL 
448, SEDF 483, SEDL 446, SEDR 443. SEDR 444; or 
candidacy in the Learning Disability Program. 

SEDL 468. Directed Teaching in the Elementary 
School (15) A fifteen week supervised clinical experience 
with 50 percent in grades two or three and 50 percent in 
grades four, five or six. In additional teaching in a K-12 
school classroom, candidates will participate in regular 
seminars where they will (1) analyze problems relating 
to their K-12 experiences; (2) explore ethical and legal 
issues related to teaching; (3) consider current issues and 
trends in K-12 education; and (4) complete their profes- 
sional portfolios. Prerequisite: approved application for 
directed teaching. Pass/fail credit. 

Foundations of Education (SEDF) 

SEDF 210. Foundations of Education (3) The art and 

science of teaching. A comprehensive examination of the 
social, historical, and philosophical influences that have 
shaped educational policies and practices in the USA with 
special emphasis on legal and ethical aspects of education. 
Supervised practicum experiences to promote reflective 
practice in a variety of settings are included. 

SEDF 333. Educational Development of the Lifelong 
Learner (3) Applications of psychology of learning and 
motivation to patterns of social, emotional, physical and 
intellectual development, and their relationship to teaching 
of children, adolescents, and adults. 

SEDF341. Introduction to Exceptional Learners/Spe- 
cial Education (3) Theoretical and practical approaches to 
the education of the young exceptional child with emphasis 
on current remedial procedures. Included are alternative 
administrative arrangements and sources of academic 
therapy. Supervised field experiences are included. 

SEDF 483. Organization and Management of the 
Diverse Classroom (3) Structuring of physical, social, 
and instructional environment to maximize learning in a 
diverse classroom. Candidates develop a comprehensive 
understanding of both practice and reactive approaches 
to management with attention to culturally diverse set- 
tings. Behaviorist and constructivist approaches, inclusive 
education and conflict resolution are components of this 
course. Prerequisites: Admission to the professional 
program, SEDL 44 1 , SEDL 447, SEDF 487, SEDL 450, 
SEDL 455. SEDR 442. Corequisites: SEDL 448, SEDR 
444, SEDL 460, SEDL 446, SEDR 443; or candidacy in 
the Learning Disability Program. 

SEDF 485. Diversity, Management, and Assessment 

(3) The dynamic relationships among classroom diversity, 
management, instruction, and assessment. Through field 
experiences and reflection, students develop knowledge 



and skills in the interaction of these classroom elements. 
Prerequisite: Admission to the professional program. 
Corequisites: SEDE 410, 420, 422, and 445 for Early 
Childhood majors only. 

SEDF 487. Student, Teacher, and School Assessment 

(3) Formal and informal assessment of elementary age 
students as well as teachers and schools. Attention is 
given to the appropriate uses of standardized testing as 
well as teachermade assessments with particular emphasis 
on the interpretation of test results and their relationship 
to instructional goals. Consideration is also be given to 
the issue of accountability and appropriate options for 
evaluating teachers and schools. Prerequisite: Admission 
to the professional program. Corequisites: SEDL 441, 
SEDL 455, SEDL 447, SEDL 450, SEDR 442. 

Reading Education (SEDR) 

SEDR 414. Emergent and Early Literacy (3) Theo- 
retical and instructional issues relating to challenges 
children encounter when learning to read and write. 
Research on the expected development of such behaviors 
through stages typically found in the preprimary and 
primary school years are explored. Procedures, materi- 
als, programs, and assessment techniques for developing 
literacy are investigated. Prerequisite: admission to the 
professional program. Corequisites: SEDE 440, 446, 
447, 448, 449. 

SEDR 418. Literacy in the Middle and Secondary School 

(3) the significance of literacy as it relates to all content 
areas. The focus is on strategies for making any text mate- 
rial more accessible to the student, and attention is given 
to matching the learner and the learning. Prerequisites: 
SEDS 440, SEDS 441 or SEDS 442 and admission to the 
professional program. Corequisite: SEDS 450. 

SEDR 442. Literacy I: Learning to Read and Write 

(3) Scaffolding reading and writing development for the 
young child. Teaching candidates review the essentials of 
language development and focus on the transition from 
oral language to initial reading and writing. Effective 
strategies and materials for nurturing literacy develop- 
ment of children ages 5-7 are emphasized. Prerequisites: 
admission to the professional program and SEGL 484. 
Corequisites: SEDL 441, SEDL 455, SEDL 447, SEDL 
450, SEDF 487; or candidacy in the Leaning Disability 
program. 

SEDR 443. Literacy II: Reading and Writing to 
Learn (3) Scaffolding reading and writing development 
of the elementary and middle grades student. Teaching 
candidates focus on the transition from initial reading 
and writing to reading and writing in the content areas. 
Effective strategies and materials for nurturing literacy 
development in children ages 8-12 are emphasized. Pre- 
requisites: admission to the professional program, SEDL 

441 , SEDL447, SEDF 487, SEDL450, SEDL 455, SEDR 

442. Corequisites: SEDL 448, SEDF 483, SEDL 460, 
SEDL 446, SEDR 444; or candidacy in the Learning Dis- 
ability Program and SEDR 442. 



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Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



SEDR 444. Literacy III: Addressing Reading and 
Writing Problems (3) Scaffolding reading and writing 
development for learners experiencing difficulty. Teach- 
ing candidates investigate assessments, strategies, and 
programs appropriate for children with literacy problems 
including learners from diverse backgrounds and children 
with special needs. Prerequisites: admission to the profes- 
sional program, SEDL 44 1 . SEDL 447. SEDF 487, SEDL 
450, SEDL 455, SEDR 442. Corequisites: SEDL 448, 
SEDF 483, SEDL 460, SEDL 446, SEDR 443. 

Secondary Education (SEDS) 

SEDS 342. Clinical I in Middle Grades/Secondary 
Education (1) Supervised clinical experience in middle 
or secondary school setting. Observation and participa- 
tion in classroom settings is required with a focus on 
diversity including the physical, social, and educational 
development of the grades 5-12 learner. Emphasis is on 
family and community involvement in educational settings. 
Observation during advisory, lunch, recess, transition 
times, as well as formal instructional time as appropriate. 
Corequisite: SEDF 341. 

SEDS 398. Topics in Secondary Education ( 1 -3) Prereq- 
uisites: junior standing and consent of instnictor. 

SEDS 399. Independent Study (3) Prerequisites: junior 
standing and consent of instructor. 

SEDS 440. Clinical II in Middle Grades/Secondary 
Education (1) Supervised clinical experience in middle 
or secondary school setting. Observation and participation 
in classroom settings is required with a focus on assess- 
ment including formal, informal, authentic, high stakes 
(PACT, end-of-course exams, etc.), and collaborative 
(team meeting) assessments as appropriate. Seminars and 
group discussions included. Prerequisites: SEDF 341, 
SEDS 342, and admission to the professional program. 
Corequisites: SEDS 441 or 442. 

SEDS 441. Middle School Curriculum and Methodol- 
ogy (4) An overview of the major concepts, principles, 
theories and research related to effective curriculum, 
instruction, and assessment to meet the varying abilites 
and learning styles of middle school students. Students 
explore a variety of teaching, learning and assessment 
strategies along with developmentally responsive materi- 
als and resources used to facilitate appropriate learning 
experiences in middle school settings. The focus is on 
curriculum needs for middle grades, the transitional func- 
tion of the middle school, and middle school organization 
and management. Core topics include unit and lesson 
planning, evaluation of student performance, multicultural 
educational issues and teacher effectiveness evaluation. 
Prerequisites: SEDF 341, SEDS 342, and admission to 
the professional program. Corequisite: SEDS 440. 

SEDS 442. Secondary School Curriculum and 
Methodology (4) An overview of the major concepts, 
principles, theories and research related to effective 
curriculum, instruction, and assessment to meet the 



varying abilities and learning styles of secondary school 
students. Students explore a variety of teaching, learning 
and assessment strategies along with developmentally 
responsive materials and resources used to facilitate 
approprate learning experiences in secondary school 
settings. Curriculum needs for secondary grades, the 
newly emerging function of the high school in work/post- 
secondary education preparation, and secondary school 
organization and management are addressed. Core topics 
include unit and lesson planning, evaluation of student 
performance, multicultural educational issues and teacher 
effectiveness evaluation. Prerequisites: SEDF 341, 
SEDS 342 and admission to the professional program. 
Corequisite: SEDS 440. 

SEDS 445. Teaching Middle and Secondary English/ 
Language Arts (3) Methods, materials, resources, issues 
and trends related to teaching specific subject content in 
middle and secondary schools, including instructional 
planning and delivery of instruction. Supervised practicum 
experiences are designed to promote reflective teaching 
in middle and secondary school settings. Prerequisites: 
SEDS 440, SEDS 441 or SEDS 442 and admission to the 
professional program. Corequisite: SEDS 450. 

SEDS 446. Teaching Middle and Secondary Mathemat- 
ics (3) Methods, materials, resources, issues and trends 
related to teaching specific subject content in secondary 
schools, including instructional planning and delivery 
of instruction. Supervised practicum experiences are 
designed to promote reflective teaching in middle and 
secondary school settings. Prerequisites: SEDS 440, 
SEDS 44 1 or SEDS 442 and admission to the professional 
program. Corequisite: SEDS 450. 

SEDS 447. Teaching Middle and Secondary Social 
Studies (3) Methods, materials, resources, issues and 
trends related to teaching specific subject content in 
middle and secondary schools, including instructional 
planning and delivery of instruction. Supervised practicum 
experiences are designed to promote reflective teaching 
in middle and secondary school settings. Prerequisites: 
SEDS 440. SEDS 44 1 or SEDS 442, and admission to the 
professional program. Corequisite: SEDS 450. 

SEDS 448. Teaching Middle and Secondary Science 

(3) Methods, materials, resources, issues and trends re- 
lated to teaching specific subject content in middle and 
secondary schools, including instructional planning and 
delivery of instruction. Supervised practicum experiences 
are designed to promote reflective teaching in middle and 
secondary school settings. Prerequisites: SEDS 440. 
SEDS 44 1 or SEDS 442 and admission to the professional 
program. Corequisite: SEDS 450. 

SEDS 449. Teaching Foreign Language in Secondary 
Schools (3) Methods, materials, resources, issues and 
trends related to teaching specific subject content in sec- 
ondary schools. Also includes instructional planning and 
delivery of instruction. Supervised practicum experiences 
designed to promote reflective teaching, in secondary 
school settings, are included. Prerequisites: SEDS 440, 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



179 



SEDS 44 1 or SEDS 442 and admission to the professional 
program. Corequisite: SEDS 450. 

SEDS 450. Clinical III in Middle Grades/Secondary 

Education (1) Supervised clinical experience in middle or 
secondary school setting. Observation and participation 
in classroom settings is required with a focus on class- 
room management and conflict resolution. Seminars and 
group discussions included. Prerequisites: SEDS 440. 
SEDS 44 1 or SEDS 442 and admission to the professional 
program. Coreqinsites: SEDR 418 and SEDS 445, 446, 
447; 448 or 449. 

SEDS 473. Directed Teaching in Secondary School 
English ( 1 5) A supervised clinical experience consisting of 
14 weeks in secondary school settings. Candidates partici- 
pate in regular seminars where they ( 1 ) analyze problems 
relating to their grade 9- 1 2 experiences; (2 ) explore ethical 
and legal issues related to teaching; (3) consider current 
issues and trends in K- 1 2 education; and (4) complete their 
professional portfolios. Prerequisite: approved application 
for directed teaching. Pass/fail credit. 

SEDS 474. Directed Teaching in Secondary School 
Foreign Language (15) A supervised clinical experi- 
ence consisting of 14 weeks in secondary school settings. 
Candidates participate in regular seminars where they ( 1 ) 
analyze problems relating to their grade 9- 1 2 experiences; 
(2) explore ethical and legal issues related to teaching; (3) 
consider current issues and trends in K-12 education; and 
(4) complete their professional portfolios. Prerequisite: ap- 
proved application for directed teaching. Pass/fail credit. 

SEDS 475. Directed Teaching in Secondary School His- 
tory and Social Studies (15) A supervised clinical experi- 
ence consisting of 14 weeks in secondary school settings. 
Candidates participate in regular seminars where they ( 1 ) 
analyze problems relating to their grade 9- 1 2 experiences; 
(2) explore ethical and legal issues related to teaching; (3) 
consider current issues and trends in K-12 education; and 
(4) complete their professional portfolios. Prerequisite: ap- 
proved application for directed teaching. Pass/fail credit. 

SEDS 478. Directed Teaching in Secondary School Math- 
ematics (15) Asupervised clinical experience consisting of 
14 weeks in secondary school settings. Candidates partici- 
pate in regular seminars where they ( 1 ) analyze problems 
relating to their grade 9- 1 2 experiences; (2 ) explore ethical 
and legal issues related to teaching; (3) consider current is- 
sues and trends in K-12 education; and (4) complete their 
professional portfolios. Prerequisite: approved application 
for directed teaching. Pass/fail credit. 

SEDS 480. Directed Teaching in the Middle School ( 1 5) 

A supervised clinical experience consisting of 14 weeks 
in secondary school settings. Candidates participate in 
regular seminars where they ( 1 ) analyze problems relating 
to their grade 5-8 experiences; ( 2 ) explore ethical and legal 
issues related to teaching; (3) consider current issues and 
trends in K-12 education; and (4) complete their profes- 
sional portfolios. Prerequisite: approved application for 
directed teaching. Pass/fail credit. 



SEDS 481. Directed Teaching in Secondary School 
Natural Science (15) A supervised clinical experience 
consisting of 14 weeks in secondary school settings. 
Candidates participate in regular seminars where they 
(1) analyze problems relating to their grade 9-12 expe- 
riences; (2) explore ethical and legal issues related to 
teaching; (3) consider current issues and trends in K-12 
education; and (4) complete their professional portfolios. 
Prerequisite: approved application for directed teaching. 
Pass/fail credit. 

Education and Technology (SEDT) 

SEDT 420. Information Systems in Education (3) The 

application of information systems to a variety of edu- 
cational settings. Topics include policy issues directing 
the design and implementation of education information 
systems, particularly data collecting and reporting proto- 
cols required for compliance with local, state, and federal 
mandates. Prerequisites; SEDF 210 SEDF 333. SEDF 
34 1 ; or consent of instructor. 

SEDT 430. Instructional Design and Methods for Infor- 
mation Systems Training (3) Design and delivery of train- 
ing programs for users of information systems and related 
technologies. Activities include the production of training 
materials, management of instructional time and selection 
of appropriate resources. Methods for the assessment and 
evaluation of the instructional materials and outcomes are 
an integral part of this course. Prerequisites: SEDF 210, 
SEDF 333, SEDF 341; or consent of instructor. 

SEDT 497. Information Systems Education Intern- 
ship (3) Supervised work experience in a district office 
and other administrative school sites. Emphasis is on 
the design, implementation, and service of information 
systems integral to the sponsoring school and district . 
The individualized course of study is designed to meet 
pre-established learning objectives. A "work practice" 
plan is required and must be approved by the sponsoring 
organization and the course instructor. Prerequisites: SEDF 
210, SEDF 333, SEDF 341; or consent of instructor. 

Special Education: Learning Disability (SELD) 

SELD 410. Methods of Teaching Students with LD (3) 

Instructional strategies and practice for teaching learners 
withLD. Prerequisite: admission to professional program. 
Corequisites: SELD 412; SELD 446. 

SELD 412. Characteristics of Students with LD (3) 

Characteristics of students who have learning disabilities 
which are manifested in instructional settings. Specific 
characteristics that are factors in developing comprehensive, 
longitudinal individualized programs as well as guidelines 
regarding LDrefenal, assessment and placement procedures 
willbe presented. Prerequisite: admission to the professional 
program. Corequisite: SELD 410, SELD 446. 

SELD 414. Individualized Curriculum for Students 
with Disabilities (3) The various etiologies of condi- 
tions affecting students with mild/moderate disabilities. 



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Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Cognitive characteristics of learners with mild/moderate 
disabilities and the impact on language development, aca- 
demic performance, social skills, and emotional behavior 
will be included. Prerequisite: SELD412. Corequisites: 
SEDC 402: SELD 483; SEED 440. 

SELD 415. Reading Disorders and Reading Methods 

(3) Specific methods designed to facilitate the development 
of reading skills of students with learning disabilities. A 
practicum experience is required. Prerequisite: SELD 
414. Corequisites: SELD 445; SELD 486. 

SELD 440. Practicum in the Instruction of Students 
with Disabilities (1-3) Sequencing, implementing, and 
evaluating individual learning objectives in a professional 
setting. Students will select, adapt, and use instructional 
strategies and materials according to characteristics of the 
learner. Prerequisite: SELD 412. Corequisites: SEDC 
400; SELD 414; SELD 483. Students in the Teacher As- 
sistant Program enroll in multiple semersters for a total 
of three hours; all others enroll in one semester for three 
credit hours. 

SELD 445. Language Disorders and Language Arts 
Methods (3) Learning disability specific methods designed 
to facilitate the development of language and social skills. 
A practicum experience is required. Prerequisite: SELD 
414, Corequisite: SELD 415; SELD 486. 

SELD 446. Math Disabilities and Math Methods 

(3) Learning disability specific methods designed to 
facilitate the development of mathematics concepts 
and skills. A practicum experience is required. Pre- 
requisites: SMTH 231, SMTH 232, SMTH 233 and 
admission to the professional program. Corequisites: 
SELD 410; SELD 412. 

SELD 449. Issues and Trends in Exceptionalities (3) 

The philosophical, historical, and legal foundations of 
special education that connect with current issues and 
trends in special education. Prerequisite: admission to 
professional program. Corequisite: SELD 470. 

SELD 470. Directed Teaching of Students with 
Learning Disabilities ( 12) A supervised clinical experi- 
ence, consisting of 14 weeks with 50 percent in a special 
education resource classroom and the remaining 50 
percent in an inclusive regular classroom. The experi- 
ence includes an exploration of ethical issues, research 
through analysis and evaluation of teaching, and oral 
presentation of research results. Prerequisite: approved 
application for directed teaching. Corequisite: SELD 
449. For pass/fail credit. 

SELD 483. Assessment of Students with Disabilities 

(3) The techniques and practices of diagnostic assess- 
ment, including ethical concerns and legal provisions/ 
guidelines. Emphasis is on identifying typical, delayed, 
and disordered communication and reasoning patterns 
of individuals with exceptional learning needs. Prereq- 
uisite: SELD 412. Corequisites: SEDC 402; SELD 
414; SELD 440. 



English Language and Literature (SEGL) 

Note: The completion of Composition ami Literature (102) or 
the equivaletU is prerequisite to enroUment in all higher level 
English courses. Only those courses that are numbered above 
300 may count toward a major in English. 

Advanced standing in freshman English classes may be 
achieved through appropriate scores on Advanced Placement 
(AP) tests, passing of appropriate College Level Examination 
Program (CLEP) tests, institutional credit by examination, or 
the English placement tests administered to all incoming USC 
Upstate freshmen. Details may be found in appropriate sections 
of this catalog or in consultation with the chair oft he department 
of languages, literature, and composition. 

Courses are offered in rotation. If you are interested in a 
particular course, check with the department chair to see when 
it will he offered. 

SEGL 101. Composition I (3) Instruction and practice 
in academic writing, critical reading and research. Atten- 
tion is given to planning, drafting, revising, and editing 
a variety of texts. For students whose placement testing 
indicates a need for more intensive study, English 101 A 
with a noncredit lab is mandatory to provide supplemental 
instruction and practice in writing. 

SEGL lOlH. Honors Composition (3) Themafic studies 
designed by English faculty specifically for honors students. 
Its focus may vary depending on the instructor's area of 
interest. Intensive reading, writing, research, and a service 
component are included. Prerequisite: Admission to honors 
program as a first year student or pemiission of director of 
honors program. Students who earn an F in SEGL 101 H 
may not re-enroll in SEGL lOlH. Students who pass SEGL 
101 H with a D are not eligible to enroll in SEGL 102H. 

SEGL 102. Composition II (3) Continued instruction 
in composition, building on skills introduced in English 
101. Attention is given to writing for specific audiences, 
reading and analyzing challenging texts, and synthesizing 
academic sources in writing. Prerequisite: SEGL 101. 

SEGL 102H. Honors Composition and Literature (3) 

Study of works of literature and their social and historical 
contexts designed by English faculty specifically for honors 
students. Its focus may vary depending on the instructor's area 
of interest. Intensive reading, writing, research, and a service 
component are included. Prerequisites: SEGL 101 H with a 
C or better and admission to honors program or permission 
of director of honors program. Students who earn an F in 
SEGL 102H must successfially complete SEGL 102. 

SEGL 208. Introduction to Creative Writing (3) Begin- 
ning writing workshop. Writers gain experience in genres 
of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. 

SEGL 245. Professional Writing (3) Developing com- 
munication skills for the successful professional. Students 
reflect and apply principles of appropriate content, style 
and fonnat for memos, letters, reports, resumes, interviews 
and presentations. 

SEGL 250. Selected English Studies Abroad (3-6) A 

selection of British writing, together with immersion in 
British culture. 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



181 



SEGL 252. Understanding English Grammar (3) In- 
tensive review of grammatical principles and mechanics 
of English with emphasis on exploration and discovery 
of principles of English grammar usage. 

SEGL 275. Masterpieces of World Literature (3) Se- 
lections from the literature of western and non-western 
cultures from ancient to modem times. 

SEGL279. Survey ofAmerican Literature I (3) American 

poetry, drama, and prose from colonial times to 1865. 

SEGL280. Survey ofAmerican Literature II (3) Ameri- 
can poetry, drama, and prose from 1 866 to the present. 

SEGL 283. Native American Literature (3) Selected 
readings by Native American writers, including novels, 
short stories and poetry. SEGL 283/SEGL 383 will be 
offered concurrently. The reading and writing assign- 
ments for students taking SEGL 383 will be longer and the 
standard for grading will be more demanding. Students 
may not enroll for both courses. 

SEGL289. Survey of British Literature I (3) British poetry, 
drama, and prose from the Old English Period to 1 797. 

SEGL 290. Survey of British Literature II (3) British 
poetry, drama, and prose from 1 798 to the present. 

SEGL 291. African American Literature (3) A survey 
of writings by African American authors. The literary 
types studied may vary. English 291/391 will be offered 
concurrently. The reading and writing assignments for 
students enrolled in SEGL 391 will be longer and the 
standard for grading will be more demanding. Students 
may not receive credit for both courses. 

SEGL300. Introduction to the Study of Literature (3) 

Tenninology and methods for the study of literature and 
criticism, involving the scrutiny of primary and second- 
ary text as well as independent research. Required for 
English majors. Students who wish to major in English 
should complete this course before enrolling in English 
courses above 30 1 . 

SEGL 30L Mythical, Classical, and Biblical Back- 
grounds (3) Central myths and stories of classical and 
biblical traditions. Myths, characters, narrative patterns, 
archetypes, and the ways classical texts have shaped imagi- 
native literature are addressed. Required for English majors. 
Students who wish to major in English should complete this 
course before enrolling in English courses above 301. 

SEGL 307. Literature and Nature (3) Readings in 
selected literature in which the natural environment is a 
central issue. 

SEGL308. Intermediate Workshop in Creative Writing 

(3) Further experience in writing poetry, fiction, and non- 
fiction. Prerequisite: SEGL 208 or consent of instructor. 

SEGL 318. Writing and Computers (3) Research, 



analysis, composition and publication with the assistance 
of computer applications. Prerequisites: SCSC 138 or 
SEDC 120. 

SEGL 319. Development of the Novel (3) A critical and 
historical study of the novel surveying major novels and 
novelists and illustrating the characteristics of the genre, 
its historical development, and its reflection of significant 
literary periods and movements. 

SEGL 320. Development of Short Fiction (3) A critical 
and historical study of short fiction surveying the genre 
and illustrating its characteristics, historical development, 
and reflection of significant literary periods. 

SEGL 322. Contemporary Literature (3) Comparative 
works by contemporary world writers. 

SEGL 325. Modern German Literature in Translation 

(3) Masterpieces of German literature. The selection 
may include texts by T. Mann, Kafka, Brecht, Hesse and 
Grass. Taught in English. This course may not be used 
to satisfy a foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. 

SEGL 329. Development of Poetry (3) The development 
of poetry as a genre and art forni. Major periods, move- 
ments, and poets from Western and world canons illustrate 
the richness of the poetic tradition. 

SEGL330. Development of Drama (3) The development 
of plays and playwrights. Plays from the classical period 
are explored, and the development of drama through its 
major movements to the present time is charted. 

SEGL345. Advanced Professional Writing (3) Advanced 

training in developing communication skills for the work- 
place. Particular emphasis is placed on conducting primary 
and secondary research, on proposal and report writing, 
and on writing as a member of a group. Prerequisite: 
SEGL 245 or consent of instructor. 

SEGL 346. Technical Writing (3) The writing of infor- 
mative text and techniques for presenting it in appropriate 
formats. Particular emphasis is placed on creating concise 
texts which use pictures, charts, graphs, and other visuals 
to convey information to readers in fields such as computer 
science, engineering, medicine, industrial technology, and 
other professions. 

SEGL350.Advanced Selected English Studies Abroad 
(3-6) Role of locale in a selection of British writing, to- 
gether with immersion in British culture. 

SEGL352. Text Editing (3) Training in preparing text for 
publication. Included are an intensive grammar review 
and the practical application of the principles of grammar, 
punctuation, and usage to create effective texts. 

SEGL 368. Life Writing and Biography (3) The writ- 
ing, reading, and criticism of biography, autobiography, 
and other nonfictional prose. 



182 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



SEGL 369. Gender and Autobiography (3) Literary 
works in which an author examines his or her own Ufe 
as it has been shaped by social and cultural notions of 
masculinity and femininity. 

SEGL370. Creative Nonfiction (3) The study and practice 
of writing reality-based prose influenced by the techniques 
of the visual narrative of film and the innovative language 
and style of poetry, fiction, and drama. Strategies for 
creating works of literary journalism; travel, nature, and 
science writing: narrative nonfiction; and other sub-genre 
areas of creative nonfiction are practiced. Prerequisite: 
SEGL 208 or consent of instructor. 

SEGL 371. Grant Writing (3) Writing effective exposi- 
tory text for grants and proposals. The skills of writing 
for a particular purpose and audience; conforming to 
stated guidelines; and using clear, concise language are 
emphasized. 

SEGL373. Writing Workshop forTeachers(3)Applica- 

tion of research informing the teaching of writing. The 
class is conducted as a writing workshop, and students 
learn to teach writing by exploring and refining their own 
composing processes. 

SEGL 383. Native American Literature (3) Selected 
readings by Native American writers, including novels, 
short stories and poetry. SEGL 283/SEGL 383 will be of- 
fered concurrently. The reading and writing assignments 
for students taking SEGL 383 will be longer, and the 
standard for grading will be more demanding. Students 
may not enroll for both courses. 

SEGL 389. Gay and Lesbian Literature (3) Literature 
by gay and lesbian authors with a major thematic focus 
on sexual identity. 

SEGL39L African American Literature (3) A survey 
of writings by African American writers. The literary types 
studied may vary. SEGL 291/391 will be offered concur- 
rently. The reading and writing assignments for students 
enrolled in SEGL 391 will be longer and the standard for 
grading will be more demanding. Students may not receive 
credit for both courses. 

SEGL 395. Narrative Poetry, Epic and Heroic (3) Se- 
lected readings (in translation) from the epic and heroic 
poetry of the world. 

SEGL 397. Topics in Writing (3) Intensive experience 
and practice in writing selected types of poetry or prose. 

SEGL 398. Topics in Language and Literature (3) 

Intensive study of selected topics. 

SEGL 399. Independent Study (1-3) Directed research 
and reading project outside the classroom of a complex and 
extensive nature in keeping with the student's major creative 
and/or scholarly interests. In addition to writing required 
for a particular independent study project, a written report 
on work accomplished is required at the end of the temi. 



Research involves both primary and secondary sources. 
May be repeated with the consent of the instructor and 
advisor for total of no more than six hours of undergraduate 
credit. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing. GPA 2.0 
overall, 2.5 in English courses. A minimum of 6 hours 
in English courses numbered 300 and above. Consent of 
the instructor and advisor. A university contract must be 
signed with all required signatures. ' 

SEGL400.ASurveyofLiteratureof Medieval England 

(3) A representative selection of early literature from the 
British Isles in English (Old and Middle), Latin, Irish, 
Welsh, and French during the Middle Ages. 

SEGL 401. Chaucer (3) Chaucer's works, with special 
attention to The Canterbiiiy Tales. 

SEGL 405. Shal^espeare Survey (3) A selection of com- 
edies, histories, tragedies, and romances. Plays from the 
early and late periods of Shakespeare's career, including 
not only his most famous works but also his lesser known 
plays, are surveyed. 

SEGL406. Studies in Shalvespeare (3) Acritical approach 
to thematic, topical, or theoretical aspects of certain plays, 
narrative poems, and sonnets. The specific themes and 
area of focus may vary. 

SEGL 408. Milton (3) Paradise Lost and other poetry. 
Prerequisite: junior standing or pennission of instructor. 

SEGL 409. English Literature, 1500-1660 (3) Poetry 
and prose of major Renaissance and Commonwealth 
writers. 

SEGL411. British Literature,1660-1740(3)Poetty,prose and 

drama of major Restoration and early 1 8th century writers. 

SEGL 412. British Literature, 1740-1800 (3) Poetry, 
prose and drama of major writers. 

SEGL 4 17. Romanticism (3) The 18th century transition 
from classicism to romanticism, and the 1 9th century mas- 
ters: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats. 

SEGL 419. Victorian Literature (3) Poetry and prose of 
major Victorian writers. 

SEGL 422. Modern Drama (3) British, American and 
continental drama beginning with Ibsen and Strindberg. 

SEGL 423. British Literature, 1900-1950 (3) Poetry, 
prose and drama of major writers. 

SEGL 424. British Literature, I950-to the Present (3) 
Poetry, prose and drama of major writers. 

SEGL 425. American Literature, Beginnings to 1830 

(3) Colonial and revolutionary American writing with 
special attention to literary types and to the influence of 
religion and politics. 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



183 



SEGL 426. American Literature, 1830-1865 (3) Read- 
ings in representative works. 

SEGL 427. American Literature, 1865-1910 (3) Read- 
ings in representative worlds. 

SEGL 428. American Literature, 1910-1950 (3) Read- 
ings in representative works. 

SEGL 429. Literature of the Harlem Renaissance (3) 

Philosophy and literature of the New Negro movement of 
the 1920s, including works by Hughes, Hurston, Cullen, 
Fauset and McKay. 

SEGL 430. American Literature, 1950-Present (3) 

Readings in representative works. 

SEGL436. Science Fiction Literature (3) Representative sci- 
ence fiction from the beginnings of the genre to the present. 

SEGL 437. Women Writers (3) Representative works 
written by women. 

SEGL 447. Souttiern Literature (3) An historical and 
critical survey of selected works of Simms, Lanier, Cable, 
Harris, Wolfe, Faulkner, O'Connor, Johnson, Wright, Mc- 
Cullers, and other southern writers. 

SEGL 451. Introduction to Linguistics (3) An overview 
of language and linguistics oriented toward language as 
a reflection of the structure of the human mind and hu- 
man society. Phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax 
and semantics and how they relate to linguistic theory, to 
issues of language use, to questions of language in the 
social context, and to issues of language acquisition and 
language learning are emphasized. 

SEGL 453. Development of tlie Englisli Language (3) 

History and evolution of the English language reflecting 
changes in phonetics, semantics, morphology, and syntax, 
as well as assembly of dictionaries. 

SEGL455. Introduction to Sociolinguistics (3) Introduc- 
tion to sociolinguistics and the study of language variation 
in speech communities around the world. Attention is 
given to the social context of linguistic diversity including 
dialectology, language and gender, language and ethnic- 
ity, pidgins and Creoles, new varieties of English, cross- 
cultural communication, discourse analysis, and applied 
sociolinguistics. 

SEGL 459. Theories of Composition (3) The theory and 
principles of rhetoric and the application of these principles 
in the student's own thinking and writing. 

SEGL468.Advanced Creative Writing(3) An intensive 

course in one genre (poetry, fiction, creative non-fic- 
tion, among others) to be announced by the instructor 
in advance. The genre selected will vary based on the 
instructor's area of interest and expertise. This course 
can be taken more than once if the genre is different. 
Prerequisite: SEGL 308. 



SEGL483. Theory of Literary Criticism (3) Various theo- 
ries of literary criticism with the aim of establishing standards 
of judgment. Practice in criticism of literary works. 

SEGL 484. Children's Literature (3) Representative 
works in children's literature appropriate for the elemen- 
tary school child. 

SEGL 485. Adolescent Literature (3) A survey of litera- 
ture written for adolescent readers, especially the realistic 
problem novel. Special attention is placed on defining 
the characteristics of the field and on developing critical 
standards for evaluating the works. 

SEGL490. Senior Seminar (3) The integration of knowl- 
edge; the exploration of ethical issues; and the application 
of the skills of research, analysis, and writing about lit- 
erature at an advanced level. Completion of an academic 
portfolio, self-directed research and writing, and formal 
oral presentations are required. The specific focus of the 
course is designed by faculty and may vary depending on 
the instructor's area of interest and the students' areas of 
concentration. Prerequisites: Senior standing; SSPH 201; 
SEGL 295; and 15 hours of SEGL courses numbered 300 
or above, including either 459, 482, or 483. 

SEGL 499. Internship (1-3) Supervised professional 
experience or research outside of the classroom, involving 
a meaningful project or activity for the employing firm or 
organization and a scholarly project for the student. For 
three credit hours, a minimum of 1 35 hours of supervised 
work, periodic class meetings and consultation with the 
instructor are required. A contractual agreement signed 
by the employer, the student, the instructor, and the dean 
of the college is mandatory. A student may repeat SEGL 
499 once with a different internship contract description 
for a total of no more than six hours of undergraduate 
credit. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing; a minimum 
of six hours in major courses numbered 300 and above; 
GPA 2.0 overall, 2.5 in English courses; and consent of 
the faculty supervisor and advisor. 

English as a Second Language (SESL) 

SESL 101 . Writing I for Non-native Speakers of English 

(3) Developing in improving the writing skills of the non- 
native English speaker. Confidence in writing abilities is 
built through a systematic approach to the understanding 
of writing as a process. 

SESL 105. Effective Reading I for Non-native Speakers 
of English (3) Developing and improving the reading and 
vocabulary skills of the non-native English speaker. 

Engineering Technology Management (SETM) 

Note: Ac/mission to the SETM program requires a 2. grade 
point average for all college-level coiirsework attempted 
prior to program admission. Admission to the SETM 
program is a prerequisite for all SETM courses. Students 
must be within 12 hours of earning an associate degree 
in an approved engineering technology field to enroll in 



184 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



300 level SETM courses. Students must hold an associate 
degree in an approved engineering technology field prior 
to enrollment in any 400-level SETM courses. 

SETM 320. Engineering Cost Analysis (4) Engineering 
economics and financial analysis of prospective alterna- 
tives. Lab includes analysis techniques, use of modeling 
tools, and applications of techniques toward real-world 
problems. Occassional off-campus laboratory sessions 
may be required. Three class and three laboratory hours 
per week. Prerequisites: Admission to ETM program 
(within 12 hours of Associate degree completion). 

SETM 330. Engineering Work Analysis (4) Techniques 
for operation analysis, work measurement, and work sam- 
pling. Major topics include human factors, work design 
principles, work environment, economic j ustification, work 
measurement and the design process. Predetemiined basic 
motion-time systems and standard data development are 
introduced. Occassional off-campus laboratory sessions 
may be required. Three class and three laboratory hours per 
week. Prerequisites: Admission to ETM program (within 
12 hours of Associate degree completion). 

SETM 370. Systems Decision Malting (4) Systems 
analysis mathematical models, environmental factors, 
operations research methodologies, dynamic systems 
and the application of a variety of computer tools. Three 
class and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: 
SETM 320, SECO 29 1 , SMTH 141. 

SETM 410. Engineering Teams Theory and Practice 

(4) Methods of understanding, planning, and presenting 
information in oral and written formats while working 
in an engineering team setting. Occassional off-campus 
laboratory sessions may be required. Three class and 
three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: SETM 
320, SETM 330. 

SETM 415. Quality Practices (4) Techniques for control- 
ling quality of work processes and assuring delivered or 
received product quality. Topics include cost of quality, 
customer/focused quality, quality diagnostic tools, total 
quality management, quality assurance and quality stan- 
dards. Occassional off-campus laboratory sessions may 
be required. Three class and three laboratory hours per 
week. Prerequisites: SETM 330 and SECO 291. 

SETM 420. Engineering Project Management (4) 

Planning, scheduling, control of engineering projects, and 
applications of project management tools. Occassional 
off-campus laboratory sessions may be required. Three 
class and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: 
SETM 410 and SETM 415. 

SETM 499. Senior Seminar (3) Integration of engineering 
technology management at an advanced level, the impact 
of engineers on society, and exploration of ethical issues. 
Written and oral presentation required. Prerequisites: 
SETM 470, SETM 410, SETM 415. Pre or co-requisite: 
SETM 420. 



Film Studies (SFLM) 

SFLM 240. Introduction to Film (3) A survey of the 
basic elements of cinema including mode of production, 
narrative structure, stylistic design, camera and marketing. 
Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SFLM 326. Motion Picture and Video Techniques (3) 

Production techniques used in preparing film and videotape. 
Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SFLM 341. Literature and Film (3) Adaptations of nov- 
els, short stories and/or plays into cinema. Historical and 
cultural contexts of production and reception of books and 
films are emphasized. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SFLM 342. Film Genre (3) Characteristics of one or more 
established movie genres such as documentary, film noir, 
science fiction, new wave cinema, horror, comedy and oth- 
ers. The genre selected may vary based on the instructor's 
area of interest or expertise. May be repeated for credit if 
the topic changes. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SFLM 360. Film Directors (3) Screening and analysis 
of feature-length films from the works of an individual 
director or a small group of directors. Analysis involves 
subject matter, themes, and content as well as technical 
choices and style, marketing, distribution, and reception 
of the motion pictures. May be repeated for credit if the 
topic changes. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SFLM 398. Special Topics in Film (3) Reading, view- 
ing, and research in a selected film period, style, or other 
matter of cinema. May be repeated for credit if the topic 
changes. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SFLM 425. History of Film to 1967 (3) The motion 
picture industry from the silent era to 1967. American 
and foreign films and film clips are analyzed to emphasize 
chronological, technical, structural, economic, thematic 
and cultural connections. Prerequisite: English 102. 

SFLM 426. Advanced Video Production (3) Crew assign- 
ments during on-air taping and independent group projects 
involving per-production, production, and post-production. 
"Hands on" experience is augmented by demonstrations, 
lectures, and readings. This course is held in the WRET 
studio in the USC Upstate Media Building. Prerequisite: 
SEGL 102 and SFLM 326 or previous video or photog- 
raphy experience and permission of Chair, Fine Arts and 
Communication Studies. 

SFLM 435. Film History after 1967 (3) American and 
foreign films and film clips are analyzed to emphasize 
chronological, technical, structural, economic, thematic, 
and cultural connections. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SFLM 475. International Film (3) Representative films 
from countries other than the United States. Major direc- 
tors, movements, and periods of Africa, Asia, Australia, 
Central and South America, and Europe are covered. 
Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



185 



SFLM 480. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Film (3) 

Cinema explored from the perspective of a specific aca- 
demic area in addition to film studies. May be repeated 
for credit if the topic changes. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SFLM 481. Cultural Diversity and Difference in Film 

(3) The representation of race, gender, ethnicity, class, 
sexuality, age, or other matter of cultural difference in 
films. Critical and theoretical readings provide framework 
to interpret cinema in a variety of genres. May be repeated 
for credit if the topic changes. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SFLM 482. Film Theory and Criticism (3) Various 
methodologies of film interpretation described and ap- 
plied, including early definitive entries to the field and 
some or all of the following: auteur, genre, star studies, 
psychoanalysis, feminism, viewer response, semiotics, 
narratology, new historicism, and cultural studies. Pre- 
requisites: SEGL 102 and SFLM 240. 



French (SFRN) 

Note: Unless otherwise indicated, readings, lectures 
and discussion in foreign language courses above the el- 
ementary level are principally in the language concerned. 
Incoming students with previous experience in a foreign 
language must take a placement test. 

SFRN 101, 102. Introductory French (3,3) Fundamentals 

of the language and culture through speaking, listening, 
reading and writing. Prerequisite for 102 is SFRN 101 or 
placement through testing. 

SFRN 201. Intermediate French (3) Review of the basic 
principles of the language, with emphasis on reading, 
writing and oral skills. Prerequisite: SFRN 102 or 121 or 
placement through testing. 

SFRN 202. Intermediate French (3) Review of the basic 
principles of the language, with emphasis on writing, oral 
skills, and the reading of literary and other authentic texts. 
Prerequisite: SFRN 201 or placement through testing. 

SFRN 204. French Culture (3) Major artistic, literary and 
historical movements ft'om the Middle Ages to modem times 
that have contributed to the French cultural identity. Taught in 
English. Prerequisite: SEGL 102 or consent of instructor. 

SFRN 210. French Oral Communication (3) Enhance- 
ment of oral expression through group discussions, oral 
presentations, and vocabulary development. Prerequisite: 
SFRN 202 or placement through testing. 

SFRN 250. Selected French Studies Abroad (3-6) De- 
velopment of intermediate level communication skills 
together with immersion in the culture of a foreign country. 
Prerequisite: SFRN 102 or 121 or consent of instructor. 

SFRN 308. Business French (3) Fundamental elements 
of the language and exercises in composition centering on 
business communication skills. Prerequisite: SFRN 202 
or consent of instructor. 



SFRN 309. French Grammar and Composition (3) 

Fundamental elements of the language and exercises 
in composition. Prerequisite: SFRN 202 or consent of 
instructor. 

SFRN 31 0. French Conversation (3) Advanced vocabulary 
development and acquisition of fluency through aural and 
oral activities. Prerequisite: SFRN 2 1 or placement test. 

SFRN 320. French Civilization (3) Culture and civiliza- 
tion of the French-speaking world, with major emphasis on 
France. Prerequisite: SFRN 202 or consent of instructor. 

SFRN 330. Survey of French Literature I (3) A selection 
of medieval and Renaissance French literature through 
the sixteenth century. Prerequisite: SFRN 202 or consent 
of instructor. 

SFRN 33 1 . Survey of French Literature II (3) A selection 
of works from the seventeenth century through the present. 
Prerequisite: SFRN 202 or consent of instructor. 

SFRN 350. Selected French Studies Abroad (3-6) 

Development of advanced level communication skills 
together with immersion in the culture of a foreign coun- 
try. Prerequisite: SFRN 202 or 210 or 250 or consent of 
instructor. 

SFRN 398. Topics in French Language or Literature 

(1-3) Prerequisite: SFRN 202 or consent of instructor. 

SFRN 399. Independent Study or Internship (1-3) 

Supervised professional experience or research outside 
the classroom. For three internship credit hours, a student 
is to work 135 hours with an approved agency; for two 
credit hours, 90 hours; for one credit hour, 45 hours. For 
an internship or for an independent study, a contract must 
be signed by the student and by the instructor of record 
and other designated faculty and administrators. Astudent 
may repeat SFRN 399 once with a different internship or 
independent study contract description for a total of no 
more than six hours of undergraduate credit. Prerequi- 
sites: GPA 2.0 overall, 2.5 in foreign language course and 
consent of faculty supervisor. 

SFRN 402. Masterpieces of French Drama (3) Selected 
works from the beginning of French theatre through the 
present. Prerequisite: SFRN 202 or consent of instructor. 

SFRN 403. Masterpieces of the French Novel (3) 

Selected works from the beginning of the French novel 
through the present. Prerequisite: SFRN 202 or consent 
of instructor. 

Geography (SGEG) 

SGEG 101. The Upstate (3) Uses the landscape ap- 
proach to study the 1 0-county area of Northwestern South 
Carolina. Spatial, economic, social, cultural, demographic 
and natural traits of the contemporary urban, suburban and 
rural landscapes are examined after an introduction to the 
landscape approach. 



186 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



SGEG 103. Introduction to Geography (3) Principles 
and methods of geographical inquiry. 

SGEG 121. Principles of Regional Geography (3) 

Description ofthe regional method and an analysis of the 
region forming processes. Emphasis is on the distinctive 
features of large areas ofthe world. 

SGEG 201. Introduction to Physical Geography (4) The 

spatial significance of land forms, water bodies, and soils. 
Emphasis is placed on both the man-land relationship and 
the concept of location. Three class and two laboratory 
hours per week. 

SGEG 202. Introduction to Weather and Climate (3) 

The interrelationship of weather elements and controls and 
the spatial distribution of climate and vegetation. 

SGEG 212. Introduction to Economic Geography (3) 

Factors in location and production of commodities, com- 
merce and manufacturing. 

SGEG 340. Geography of Population, Settlement and 
Migration (3) (=SSOC 327) Births, deaths, migration and 
the distribution of human populations, and the analytical 
methods used in the study of each of these topics. 

SGEG 398. Special Topics (3) Geographic dynamics and 
characteristics at the local, regional or global level. May be 
taken twice if the topic is different. Prerequisite: Any lower 
division geography course or consent of instructor. 

SGEG 424. Geography of North America (3) Physical 
and cultural geography of North America with emphasis 
on the United States. 



SGEL 1 2 1 . Geology of North America (3) Analysis of the 
geological history and development ofthe North American 
landmass, regions and resources. Comparison of similari- 
ties among regions, though formed at widely separated 
periods in earth history, will be emphasized. Three class 
hours per week and field trips are required. 

SGEL 123L. Geology of National Parks - Field Study 

(1) Developing field techniques in a national park setting. 
Principles of geology are reinforced in the classroom com- 
ponent followed by travel to a national park for geological 
research and the development of appropriate field notes. 
Prerequisite: SGEL 121 or consent of instructor. 

SGEL 131. Earth Resources (3) Mineral, earth and water 
resources, with particular attention to their occurrence and 
use, and the interaction between geology and economics 
as limiting factors on resource development. Three class 
hours per week and field trips are required. 

SGEL 241. Environmental Geology of South Carolina 

(3) An investigation for the environmental geology of 
South Carolina focusing on specific case studies including 
water issues, beach management, waste disposal, energy 
production and use. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing 
or consent ofthe instructor. 

SGEL 310. Paleobiology (4) Taxonomy and morphol- 
ogy of fossil organisms. Three class and three laboratory 
hours per week. Prerequisite: SGEL 102 or SBIO 102 or 
consent of instructor. 

SGEL 399. Independent Study (1-6) Directed research 
project depending on student interest and needs. Prereq- 
uisite: consent of instructor. 



Geology (SGEL) 

SGEL 101 . Physical Geology (4) Methods and procedures 
of science for interpretation ofthe earth. The natural pro- 
cesses and their products — the minerals, rocks, fossils, 
structure and surface forms of the earth are considered. 
Emphasis is placed on the interplay between hypothesis, 
experiment, and observable fact which characterize pro- 
ductive physical science. Three class and three laboratory 
hours per week. 

SGEL 102. Historical Geology (4) The practice of geology 
as an historical science with emphasis on the methods of 
analysis, nature ofthe record, and guiding principles that 
have allowed geologists to decipher the history ofthe earth. 
Three class and three laboratory hours per week. 

SGEL 103. Environmental Earth Science (4) Analysis 
ofthe basic energy cycles ofthe earth the interaction of 
human activity with earth processes to affect the environ- 
ment. Three class and three laboratory hours per week. 

SGEL 120. Geology ofthe Southeast (3) Investigation of 
the geological processes responsible for the land forms and 
natural resources ofthe southeastern United States. Three 
class hours per week and field trips are required. 



German (SGRM) 

Note: Unless otherwise indicated, readings, lectures 
and discussion in foreign language courses above the el- 
ementaiT level are principally in the language concerned. 
Incoming students with previous experience in a foreign 
language must take a placement test. 

SGRM 101. 102. Introductory German (3,3) Funda- 
mentals of the language and culture through speaking, 
listening, reading and writing. Prerequisite for 102 is 
SGRM 101 or placement through testing. 

SGRM 105, 106. Introduction to Business German 

(3,3) Basic oral and written language skills, as well as 
intercultural awareness necessary for the modem busi- 
ness environment. Prerequisite for 106 is SGRM 105 or 
consent of instructor. 

SGRM 121. Elementary German (3) Intensive review 
and continuation of basic grammar and vocabulary for 
fundamental communication skills. Placement in SGRM 
121 assumes a minimum of two years high school level 
experience in the language. 

SGRM 201. Intermediate German (3) Review ofthe 
basic principles ofthe language, with emphasis on read- 



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187 



ing, writing, and oral skills. Prerequisite: SGRM 102 or 
121 or placement through testing. 

SGRM 202. Intermediate German (3) Review ofthe basic 
principles ofthe language, with emphasis on writing, oral 
skills, and the reading of literary and other authentic texts. 
Prerequisite: SGRM 201 or placement through testing. 

SGRM 204. German Culture (3) Major artistic, liter- 
ary and historical movements from the Middle Ages to 
modem times that have contributed to the German cultural 
identify. Taught in English. Prerequisite: SEGL 102 or 
consent of instructor. 

SGRM 210. German Oral Communication (3) Enhance- 
ment of oral expression through group discussion, oral 
presentations, and vocabulary development. Prerequisite: 
SGRM 202 or placement through testing. 

SGRM 250. Selected German Studies Abroad (3-6) 

Development of intermediate level communication 
skills together with immersion in the culture of a foreign 
country. Prerequisite: SGRM 102 or 121 or consent of 
instructor. 

SGRM 308. Business German (3) Elements of language 
centering on written business communication skills. Pre- 
requisite: SGRM 202 or consent of instructor. 

SGRM 310. German Conversation (3) Advanced vocabu- 
lary development and acquisition of fluency through aural 
and oral activities. Prerequisite: SGRM 2 10 or placement 
through testing. 

SGRM 325. Modern German Literature in Translation 

(3) Masterpieces of German literature. The selection inay 
include texts by T. Mann, Kafka, Brecht, Hesse and Grass. 
Taught in English. This course may not be used to satisfy 
a foreign language requirement. Prerequisites: SEGL 102 
or consent of instructor. 

SGRM 350. Selected German Studies Abroad (3-6) Devel- 
opment of advanced level communication skills together with 
immersion in the culture of a foreign country. Prerequisite: 
SGRM 202 or 2 1 or 250 or consent of instructor. 

SGRM 398. Topics in German Literature/Language 

(1-3) Prerequisite: SGRM 202 or consent of instructor. 

SGRM 399. Independent Study or Internship (1-3) 

Supervised professional experience or research outside 
the classroom. For three internship credit hours, a stu- 
dent is to work 135 hours with an approved agency; for 
two credit hours, 90 hours; for one credit hour, 45 hours. 
For an internship or for an independent study, a contract 
must be signed by the student and by the instructor of 
record and other designated faculty and administrators. 
A student may repeat SGRM 399 once with a different 
internship or independent study contract description for 
a total of no more than six hours of undergraduate credit. 
Prerequisites: GPA 2.0 overall, 2.5 in foreign language 
course, and consent of faculty supervisor. 



Government and International Studies (SGIS) 

SGIS 201. American National Government (3) The 

formation and development ofthe national government, 
its organization and powers. 

Note: Government and International Studies 201 
must be completed prior to enrolling In upper division 
government and International studies courses. 

SGIS 210. Research Methods in Political Science (3) 

Various approaches to the rigorous study of political phe- 
nomena. The einphasis is upon the critical thinking and 
evaluative skills necessary to the understanding of politics. 
Among the techniques to be considered are surveys, charts 
and graphs, case studies, and statistical summaries. 

SGIS 238. Fundamentals of Political Behavior (3) 

Interpretation ofthe basic concepts relative to American 
political behavior. Focus on political ideology, political 
culture, including political socialization, and both indi- 
vidual and group political behavior. 

SGIS 300. Introduction to Political Theory (3) A survey 
of various concepts in western political philosophy such 
as political obligation, freedom, equality, justice, rights, 
authority, and power. 

SGIS 301. Introduction to Political Science (3) An 

introduction to ideas important in the study of politics. 
Topics include the concept of power and the nature ofthe 
state as seen in the ideologies of totalitarianism, fascism, 
socialism, communism, liberalism and pluralism. 

SGIS 310. International Politics (3) An introduction 
to the basic factors influencing nation-state behavior in 
the world: the nation-state system, nationalism and im- 
perialism, national power, and the present world crisis. 
The role ofthe United States in the world community is 
emphasized. 

SGIS 312. Race and Ethnicity in American Politics 

(3) Impact of race and ethnicity on political participa- 
tion, representation, institutions, and the evolution of 
public policy. 

SGIS 320. Comparative Politics (3) An introduction to 
the analysis ofthe major types of political systems utilizing 
examples drawn from democratic, communist and underde- 
veloped nation-states. Problems, approaches and methods 
associated with the comparative field are emphasized. 

SGIS 324. Campaigns and Elections (3) The function, 
organization, actors, and consequences of campaigns 
and elections in American politics. Particular races and 
campaigns will be featured as examples for research into 
how campaigns work and why they matter. 

326. Middle East Politics (3) Comparative study of politi- 
cal processes within Middle Eastern countries and their 
relations with other states, particularly the United States. 
Prerequisite: SGIS 201. 



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SGIS 327. East Asian Politics (3) Comparative study of 
political processes within East Asian countries and their 
relations with other countries, particularly the United 
States. Prerequisite: SGIS 201. 

SGIS 330. International Organizations (3) An introduc- 
tion to the staicture and functions of international political 
and economic organizations. Particular attention is given 
to the United Nations and its specialized agencies and to 
emerging regional communities. 

SGIS 340. United States Foreign Policy (3) Fomiulation 
of American foreign policy, problems of security, trade 
and diplomacy. Policies related to specific nation-states 
and regions will be emphasized. 

SGIS 350. Women and American Politics (3) The partici- 
pation of women in American political life and their influ- 
ence in electoral politics and issue-based movements. 

SGIS 360. American Political Parties (3) The functions, 
history and future of political parties in the United States. 
Emphasis is on the development of political parties and 
the consequences of that development upon the party as 
an organization, the party as an electorate, and the party 
in the government. 

SGIS 361 . Political Behavior (3) Political participation in 
the United States through such activities as interest groups, 
political protest, contacting officials, voting, running for 
office. Who participates and why, and the consequences 
of participation for policy decisions and for society are 
also examined. 

SGIS 363. Southern Politics (3) Selected political patterns 
and trends within the eleven states of the American South 
including historical developments since 1950. 

SGIS 364. State and Local Government (3) (=SCRJ 
364) The institutions, functions, policy making processes, 
and politics of state and local governments including 
an examination of the relations between state and local 
government, and the relations between state and local 
government and the national government. 

SGIS 365. Politics and Media (3) (=SJOU 365) Interpreta- 
tion of the pivotal role of media in contemporary American 
politics. Familiarizes the student with fundamental concepts 
regarding the pervasive role of media in how it shapes our life, 
political ideology, political culture and political behavior. 
Prerequisite: SGIS 201 or permission of instmctor. 

SGIS 370. Introduction to Public Administration (3) 

(= SCRJ 370) The basic principles and theory of admin- 
istrative structure, responsibility, and control in relation 
to policy making in the modem state. 

SGIS 374. Introduction to Public Policy (3) Social, politi- 
cal, and technical forces in policy making including various 
theories of public policy and inquires into selected policy 
areas. Current policy issues are included and integrated 
into the larger theories of decision making. 



SGIS 380. Environmental Policy (3) An investigation 
of American national and international issues relating to 
the ecological basis of human living. Special attention 
is on environmental issue-areas including air, water, for- 
ests, soil erosion, and wildlife as well as the impact of 
population, the economy, and technology on the quality 
of the environment. 

SGIS 385. American Political Thought (3) A survey of 
American political theorists from the colonial period to 
the present with an examination of the social, cultural, 
historical and scientific developments that have contributed 
to the nature of American political thinking. 

SGIS 386. Art and Politics (3) A presentation of the 
connection between art and political thought. The course 
focuses on architecture, painting, and music as they express 
political values and attitudes. Prerequisite: SGIS 201. 

SGIS 399. Independent Study (1-6) 

SGIS 400. Terrorism and Political Violence (3) Forms, 
causes, and consequences of political violence with special 
attention to terrorism. 

SGIS 403. History of Western Political Thought (3) A 

survey of political theories propounded by w estem politi- 
cal philosophers from Plato to Nietzsche. 

SGIS 420. Women and Politics: A Global Perspective 

(3) Women's status and political activism around the 
globe. The focus is on similarities and differences and 
the bases for them. Prerequisite: SGIS 320 or consent 
of instructor. 

SGIS 445. Public Policy Seminar: K- 12 School Reform 
(3) Examination of current K-I2 school refonn efforts 
as public policy initiatives. Analysis of various models 
and approaches as appropriate methods of stabilizing and 
changing public schools as institutions fundamental to 
American society. 

SGIS 450. Constitutional Law (3) The evolution of 
governmental powers focusing on the judiciary, the 
presidency, congress, the states, and intergovernmental 
relations. 

SGIS 45 1 . Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (3) (=SCRJ 
451) Freedom of religion, freedom of speech and as- 
sociation, due process, equal protection, and criminal 
procedure. 

SGIS 452. The Judicial Process (3) (=SCRJ 452) The 

growth of law, the lawmaking of the courts, the structure 
and organization of federal and state courts, the procedures 
involved in civil and criminal cases, and the problems and 
proposals for reform in the administration of justice. 

SGIS 460. International Law (3) History and basic 
principles of law among nation-states. Emphasis is upon 
the scope of international law and the extent to which law 
shapes the behavior of international actors. 



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189 



SGIS 462. The Legislative Process (3) Structure, orga- 
nization, powers, functions and problems of legislative 
bodies. 

SGIS 463. Tlie American President (3) The constitutional 
powers and political roles of the president with lesser 
emphasis upon state governors. Emphasis is placed on 
the chief executive and administration, executive relation- 
ships with legislatures, and party and popular leadership 
by the executive. 

SGIS 481. The Politics of Inequality (3) The progress 
made by, and relationship between, the struggles for 
racial, gender, and economic equality in America. Top- 
ics include theories of justice, the nature of oppression, 
political participation, and the philosophical and legal 
development of equal rights. 

SGIS 491. Topics in Government and International 
Studies (1-3) May be repeated once as topics change. 

SGIS 495. Political Science Internship (1-6) Super- 
vised work experience in a political or governmental 
environment. A minimum of three hours work per week 
is required for each credit hour. Students are required to 
meet periodically with the supervising faculty member. 
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and consent of the 
instructor. Students are limited to a maximum of six hours 
combined from SGIS 495 and 496. 

SGIS 496. Public Administration Internship (1-6) 

Supervised work experience in a public administration 
environment. A minimum of three hours work per week 
is required for each credit hour. Students are required to 
meet periodically with the supervising faculty member. 
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and consent of the 
instructor. Students are limited to a maximum of six hours 
combined from SGIS 495 and 496. 

SGIS 500. Senior Seminar (3) Exploration, at an ad- 
vanced level, of issues, topics and dilemmas in both the 
subject matter and the profession of political science with 
emphasis on research and oral presentation of research 
findings. The specific topics covered in the course vary . 
Prerequisites: 1 2 hours of SGIS at the 300-level or above, 
or consent of instructor. 

SGIS 571. Public Financial Administration (3) Prin- 
ciples and practices of financial administration including 
organization, budgeting, assessment, treasure manage- 
ment, and debt. 

SGIS 572. Public Personnel Management (3) Fundamen- 
tal principles of personnel organization and administration, 
including an analysis of personnel techniques. 



Healthcare Information Management 
and Systems (SHIM) 

SHIM 201. Understanding Healthcare Organiza- 
tions (3) Introduction to origins and evolution of current 
healthcare delivery systems and organizational structures, 



healthcare terminology and language structures, common 
usage, acronyms, and basic uses of infonnation in a variety 
of healthcare settings. Topics also include introduction to 
levels of information users and information needs within a 
variety of healthcare organizations. Prerequisites: SCSC 
138, SIMS 201, or consent of instructor. 

SHIM 250. Department Administration in Healthcare 

(3) Management, communication, and problem-solving 
as they relate to human resources, quality assurance, 
finance, budgeting and reimbursement in a healthcare 
setting. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent 
of instructor. 

SHIM 301. Healthcare Information Systems (3) In- 
troduction to healthcare information systems to include 
management and administration information systems, 
clinical information systems, business information 
systems, decision support, critical care applications, 
information systems in education, and emergent system 
applications. Particular emphasis is placed on automa- 
tion required for the emerging "paperless" environment 
and computer-based records. Prerequisite: SHIM 201 or 
consent of instructor. 

SHIM 302. Information Trends in Healthcare Systems 

(3) Data, knowledge, and information structures, termi- 
nological control, index language functions, regulatory 
determinants of data col lected/stored ( ex. JC AHO/H IPPA, 
etc.), including study of language development in health- 
care systems evolution. Prerequisite: SHIM 301 orconsent 
of instructor. 

SHIM 412. Ethics and Risk Management in Healthcare 
Information Systems (3) Selected ethical issues, confi- 
dentiality, preservation and conservation of sensitive data, 
data maintenance and integrity preservation. Prerequisites: 
SPHL211 orSPHL310or SPHL311 or SPHL 321; and 
SHIM 302; or consent of instructor. 

SHIM 413. Network Applications for Healthcare Infor- 
mation Systems (3) Network configurations and functions 
including the latest developments and applications in 
electronic health records (EHR) and the implementation 
of the EHR in the healthcare industry. 

SHIM 417. Healthcare Information Security (3) In- 
frastructure assessment, business protection practices, 
and compliance management based on the International 
Information Systems Security Certification Consortium's 
10-domain model for healthcare information technology 
systems. Prerequisite: SCSC 3 1 5 or consent of instmctor. 
SHIM 450. Healthcare Database Systems and Informa- 
tion Retrieval (3) Database formats and structures, query 
techniques, document classification, managing large data 
collections, statistical applications in data management. 
Emphasis is placed on the discovery of methods to capture 
data as an important institutional resource through efficient 
management of databases and data repositories, and on 
the importance of data collections that provide accurate 
outcome assessment. Prerequisite: SIMS 421 orconsent 
of instructor. 



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SHIM 496. Special Topics (3) Study reflective of current 
issues/topics related to the field of healthcare information 
management. Topics might include (but are not limited 
to) emergent technology in healthcare settings such as 
user interface design, expert system evolution, virtual 
environments, soft computing/fuzzy logic applications, 
artificial intelligence. Topics chosen for study in a given 
semester will be determined by the sate of the science at 
the time of the otTering. Prerequisite: Completion of 12 
hours SHIM courses. 

SHIM 498. Practicum in Healtiicare Information Man- 
agement (3) Supervised professional practice involving 
infomiation management in a healthcare organization. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing in the healthcare informatics 
application area. 

Healtli Education (SHED) 

SHED 170. First Aid (3) Instmction leading to basic 
certification in standard first aid and cardiopulmonary 
resuscitation. Discussion of HlV/AlDS and back injury 
prevention is also included. 

SHED 221. Lifelong Health and Wellness (3) Well- 
ness and fitness trends in America. Self-assessment of 
health status concepts, human sexuality, health promotion 
strategies (physical fitness, stress management, nutrition, 
weight control) and health maintenance of major life style 
diseases (Cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes mellitus, 
HIV, substance abuse). 

SHED 331. Health and Physical Education for the 
Elementary School Child (3) Methods and materials for 
teaching health and physical education in the elementary 
school including integration and correlation of materials with 
other subjects at primary and intermediate grade levels. 

SHED 334. The School Health Program (3) Methods of 
teaching health with special emphasis on the relationship 
of health to physical education. Health service, healthful 
school living, and method and materials of teaching health 
are included. Prerequisites: SHED 221 and SBIO 232. 

History (SHST) 

SHST 101. Introduction to World History I (3) World 
history to 1 500. Using a global approach, emphasis is placed 
on major political, social, economic, and cultural trends. 

SHST 102. Introduction to World History II (3) 1 500 to 

the present. Using a global approach, emphasis is placed on 
major political, social, economic, and cultural trends. 

SHST 105. History of the United States to 1877 (3) 

The indigenous peoples, the era of discovery, and the 
nation from Independence to the end of Reconstruction, 
emphasizing major political, economic, social, and intel- 
lectual developments. 

SHST 1 06. History of the United States from 1 865 (3) The 

rise of modem America after the Civil War, emphasizing 



the political, social, economic, and intellectual trends that 
contributed to the development of contemporary society. 

SHST 198. Current History (1) Major events in the news 
with emphasis on their historical context and likely long-range 
significance. May be taken up to three times for credit. 

Note: the prerequisite for all upper division history 
courses is any 100-level history' course or the consent of 
the instructor 

SHST 300. Introduction to Historical Studies (3) Meth- 
ods of historical inquiry. Particular attention is given to 
primary and secondary sources, document analysis, citation 
methods, research paper skills, and historical writing. 

SHST 301 . Early North America (3) The history of North 
America from its earliest inhabitants, the exploration and 
colonization ofNorth America through the end of the Seven 
Years' War. The subject matter includes Native American 
societies, background on the Europeans and Africans who 
would migrate to the colonies, the collision of cultures, family 
life and labor, colonial administration, and the development 
of international rivalries in North America. 

SHST 302. History of the Revolutionary Era (1763- 

1 789) (3) Era from the end of the Seven Years' War through 
the ratification of the United States Constitution including 
the social, political, economic, cultural, and geographic 
development of the new nation out of the struggle for 
independence. 

SHST 303. History of the Early American Republic 

(1789-1820) (3) The ratification of the United States 
Constitution through the first three decades of American 
independence, including the social, political, economic, 
cultural, and geographic development of the new nation 
through this period. 

SHST 304. The Age of Jackson (1820-1848) (3) The 

Jacksonian Era from 1820 through 1848, including the 
social, political, economic, cultural, and geographic de- 
velopment of the new nation under this period. 

SHST 305. Sectionalism and Civil War (1848-1877) 

(3) The Civil War Era from 1848 through 1877 including 
the social, political, economic, cultural, and geographic 
development of the nation during this period, with a con- 
centration on the rise of sectionalism in the country, the 
mi litary and social conflicts during war, and the tribulations 
of the Reconstruction era. 

SHST 306. Guilded Age and Progressive Era America 
(1877-191 7) (3) The Guilded Age and the Progressive Era 
between 1877 and 1917 including the social, political, 
economic, cultural, and geographic development of the 
nation during this period. 

SHST 307. The United States and the World at War, 
1914-1945 (3) The era from 1914 to 1945, focusing on 
the social, political, economic, cultural, and geographic 
development of the nation during this period including 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



191 



the American involvement in the two World Wars, the 
Roaring Twenties, and the Great Depression. 

SHST 310. African-American History to 1865 (3) The 

African background, origins of slavery, the rise of the 
free black community, and African Americans as actors 
in the political, economic, social, and cultural history of 
the United States to the end of the Civil War. 

SHST 311. African-American History since 1860 (3) 

The African American role in the Civil War Emancipa- 
tion, Reconstruction, and the development of the black 
community since 1860. Major topics include African 
Americans' struggle for autonomy and equal rights in 
the political and economic arenas, the impact of race in 
American society, and the intellectual and cultural tradi- 
tions of African Americans. 

SHST 31 2. American Military History (3) United States 
involvement in armed conflicts from the colonial period 
to the present. Subjects covered include the evolution 
of warfare, the place of the military in society, and the 
development of professionalism in American forces. 

SHST 313. The Vietnam War (3) The causes, major 
events, and impact of the Vietnam War viewed in a cross- 
cultural context. 

SHST318.NativeAmerican History (3) Pre-Columbian 
times to the present in North America. Emphasis is placed 
on economic, political, military and social changes in na- 
tive cultures over time in response to European and then 
American enroachment. 

SHST320. The South to 1 865 (3) The southern United States 
from the colonial era to the end of the Civil War, emphasiz- 
ing the development of regionally distinct political, social, 
economic, and cultural characteristics and institutions. 

SHST 321.The South since 1865(3)ThesouthemUnited 
States from the era of Reconstruction to the present. Top- 
ics include the tension between an increasingly national 
focus in economics and politics and the desire to maintain 
local social control. The question of the persistence of a 
southern identity is central. 

SHST 322. History of South Carolina, 1670 to the Pres- 
ent (3) The origins and development of South Carolina 
from colonial times to the present with emphasis on the 
unique role the state has played in the nation's history. 

SHST 323. Our Past: Upstate History (3) Local his- 
tory, focusing on Greenville, Spartanburg, and Cherokee 
Counties. Public/applied history techniques and projects 
are included. 

SHST 330. Early Mediterranean Empires (3) Peoples 
in trade, politics, culture, and society in the Mediterra- 
nean region through the rise of the Byzantine Empire. 
Significant attention is given to the Egyptian, Persian, 
and Byzantine Empires with the main emphasis on 
Greece and Rome. 



SHST 332. Renaissance and Reformation in Europe (3) 

Economic, political, social and cultural developments in Italy 
in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries; their spread north 
and collision with the new ideas released in the Protestant 
revolt of the sixteenth century. Significant attention is given 
to the religious wars of the late 1500s and early 1600s. 

SHST 333. Absolutism and Enlightenment in Europe 

(3) Social, economic, intellectual, cultural and political 
transfonnation of Europe from Louise XIV to the French 
Revolution. Significant attention is given to Absolutism, 
Louise XIV, Peter the Great, Frederick the Great, Maria 
Theresa, Catherine the Great and the new ideas of the 
Enlightenment. 

SHST 335. Twentieth Century Eastern Europe (3) 

Eastern Europe from Austro-Hungarian, Russian and 
German domination to present. Significant attention is 
paid to nationalism, national self-determination. World 
Wars 1 and II, economic and political struggles, communist 
domination, and independence. 

SHST 336. Nineteenth Century Europe (3) Europe 
from the French Revolution to the end of the nineteenth 
century. Significant attention is paid to the French Revolu- 
tion, the Napoleonic Era, industrial development and its 
consequences, new ideologies, imperialism, and the rise 
of Italy and Germany. 

SHST 337. Age of the World Wars (3) World War I, the 
Inter- war years, and World War II. Particular attention is 
given to the causes and events of World War I, the Paris 
Peace Conference of 1919, the struggles of the Inter-war 
period, the rise of Adolf Hitler, and the causes and events 
ofWorldWarll. 

SHST 338. Europe's Cold War (3) The Cold War ex- 
perience in Europe from 1 945 to the early 1 990s, from a 
political, social, cultural, economic and military perspec- 
tive. Significant attention is given to European recovery, 
the creation of the Soviet Bloc as well as its demise, and 
European unity. 

SHST 340. Germany since 1870 (3) Cultural, political, 
intellectual and social impact of unification. World War 
I, the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, East and West 
Gemiany, and reunification. 

SHST 341. History of Modern Russia (3) Political, 
economic, social and cultural developments from the 
mid-nineteenth century through the present. 

SHST 347. Medieval Britain 1066-1399 (3) Political, 
social, economic, religious, and intellectual development 
in Britain during the High Middle Ages, from the Norman 
Conquest to the fall of Richard II. 

SHST 348. Early Modern Britain 1399-1 750 (3) British 
social, political, religious, cultural, and economic devel- 
opment in the early modern period. Topics will include 
Henry VIII, Bloody Mary, Elizabeth, the English Civil 
War and the Glorious Revolution. 



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SHST 349. Modern Britain 1750-Present (3) British 
social, political, religious, cultural and economic develop- 
ment in the modem period, including the rise of industri- 
alization, imperialism, and the two World Wars. 

SHST350. Genocides in Europe (3) Causes, comparisons, 
and consequences of ethnic cleansing and genocide from 
the late nineteenth century through the present. Significant 
attention is paid to the Jewish Holocaust in World War II. 

SHST 351. Women in Early Modern Europe and 
America (3) Changing notions of the female body and 
women's roles as lovers, housewives, mothers, philoso- 
phers, consumers, workers, saints and potential citizens in 
pre-industrial, commercial and early industrial Europe. 

SHST 352. Women in Modern Europe and America 

(3) Industrialization, changing images of the female body, 
radical and reform movements, war, economic depression, 
citizenship, race, professionalization, women's unwaged 
as well as wage labor, and effect of occupational choice 
upon women's social roles. 

SHST 353. History of Science (3) The development of 
natural philosophy from the ancient Greeks through the 
Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment to the rise of 
modem science. 

SHST 354. Birth of Europe 300-1000 (3) European 
political, social, economic, religious, and intellectual 
development from the establishment of Christianity as an 
officially sanctioned religion to the dawn of the feudal age. 
Topics will include the Germanic kingdoms, Charlemagne's 
Empire and the Viking invasions. 

SHST 355. Medieval Civilization 1000-1400 (3) Euro- 
pean political, social, economic, religious, and intellectual 
development during the High Middle Ages. Topics will 
include feudalism, the Cmsades, and the Black Death. 

SHST 360. Africa to 1800 (3) Traditional culture, early 
civilizations, rise of Islam, Sudanic empires, and the slave 
trade era. 

SHST 361. Africa since 1800 (3) Commercial and reli- 
gious revolutions of the 19th century, partition, colonial 
mie, post-independence, and South Africa. 

SHST 370. History of China (3) The cultural, economic, 
social, and political development of China with emphasis 
on the transformation of traditional Chinese society from 
1 644 to the present. 

SHST 371. History of Japan (3) The cultural, economic, 
social, and political development of Japan with emphasis 
on the transformation of traditional Japanese society from 
1600 to the present. 

SHST 372. History of India (3) The cultural, economic, 
social, and political development of India with emphasis on 
Hindu and Islamic influences, the rise of nationalism during 
the period of British rule, and post-independence India. 



SHST 373. Pre-modern East Asia (3) Political, cultural, 
and economic development in China, Japan, and Korea 
before 1 600 with an emphasis on interactions of different 
regions in East Asia. 

SHST 375. Revolutions in Modern China (3) Political 
history of China between the late 1 9th century and the 
early 21st century, including the emergence of Chinese 
nationalism, the spread of Marxism, the rise of the Chinese 
Communist Party, democratic movements in mainland 
China and Taiwan, and political and economic reforms. 

SHST 380. Latin American to 1830 (3) Indigenous 
cultures, the Spanish and Portuguese presence in the 
Caribbean, South America and Mesoamerica through 
independence. 

SHST 381. Latin American since 1810 (3) Independence, 
the national period, the stmggles for political stability and 
democracy and against militarism and authoritarianism, eco- 
nomic development, issues of ethnic identity and culture. 

SHST 390. Foundations of a Global Society to 1800 

(3) Early interaction among major world areas; the be- 
ginning of European maritime expansion in the fifteenth 
century; the establishment of colonial and commercial 
empires; the slave trade era; and the political, economic, 
and cultural consequences of these developments to the 
early nineteenth century. 

SHST 391 . Emergence of a Global Society since 1800 (3) 

Developments since the late eighteenth century, including 
the impact of population increase and migration, the im- 
perialism of the later nineteenth century and the nature and 
consequences of the colonial era that followed, the transition 
to independence, continuing technological innovation and 
the interconnectedness of the contemporary world. 

SHST 399. Independent Study (1-6) 

SHST 491. Topics in History (3) Reading and research 
on selected historical subjects. Prerequisite: Any lower 
division history class or consent of instructor. 

SHST 492. Topics in United States History (3) Reading 
and research on selected historical subjects related to the 
history of the United States. Prerequisite: U.S. history at 
the 300-level or consent of instructor. 
SHST 493. Topics in European History (3) Reading and 
research on selected European subjects. 

SHST 494. Topics in Non-Western History (3) Reading 
and research on selected Non-Western subjects. 

SHST 495. Topics in African-American History (3) 

Reading and research on selected historical subjects related 
to the African-American experience. Prerequisite: SHST 
3 1 0, SHST 3 1 1 , or consent of instmctor. 

SHST 496. Topics in Women's History (3) Reading and 
research on selected subjects in women's history. Prerequisite: 
Any lower division history class or consent of instructor. 



Course Descriptions 
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193 



SHST 500. Senior Seminar (3) Exploration, at an ad- 
vanced level, of issues, topics and dilemmas in both the 
subject matter and the profession of history with emphasis 
on research and oral presentation of research findings. The 
specific topics covered in the course vary. Prerequisite: 12 
hours of SHST at the 300-level or above with a minimum 
grade of C, or consent of instructor. 

Honors Courses (HONS) 

HONS 101. First Year Honors Experience (3) Study 
of a particular theme taught by faculty across disciplines. 
Intensive reading, writing, and research. Prerequisite: 
Admission to Honors Program as a first year student; or 
permission of director of honors program. 

HONS 102. Cliancellor's Honors Seminar (1-3) Study 
of a particular topic taught by the Chancellor or Execu- 
tive Vice-Chancellor of Academic Affairs. Prerequisite: 
Admission to Honors Program or permission of director 
of honors program. 

HONS 250. Honors TVavel (1-3) Visits to and study of 
international or US sites of historic, cultural, and/or literary 
significance. Content and itinerary will vary depending on 
the instructor's area of interest. Prerequisite: Admission to 
Honors Program or pennission of honors program director. 

HONS 301. Honors Colloquium Study (3) Examination 
of a particular theme taught by faculty across disciplines. 
Intensive reading, writing, and research. Prerequisite: Ad- 
mission to Honors Program as a sophomore, j unior or transfer 
student; or pennission of director of honors program. 

HONS 350. Honors Travel (3) Visits to and study of 
international or U.S. sites of historic, cultural, scientific, 
and/or literary significance. The focus and work product 
for the course vary depending on the instructor's area of 
interest. Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program or 
overall GPAof 3 .25 at USC Upstate or accredited institution 
with pennission of the Director of the Honors Program. 

HONS 399. Honors Independent Study (3-4). Directed 
research and reading of a complex and extensive nature 
in keeping with the student's major interests. A written 
report or work is required at the end of the term. Research 
involves both primary and secondary sources. Consent 
of the Director of the Honors Program. May be repeated 
with the consent of the Director of the Honors Program 
for a total of no more than eight hours of undergraduate 
Honors credit. A university contract must be completed 
with all required signatures. 

HONS 401. Honors Thesis (3) Independent original 
scholarship completed under the supervision of an honors 
faculty member. Work completed is an original essay, 
annotated creative work or performance, scientific report, 
or other special project. One meeting hour per week and 
independent research. May be repeated for credit once. 
Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program; 12 honors 
credits, permission of director of honors program. 



Information Management and Systems (SIMS) 

SIMS 101. Survey of Information Technology (3) 

Use of information technology to collect, analyze, and 
transfonn data into knowledge using desktop software 
and commonly available Internet-based resources and the 
evaluation of infonnation sources foraccuracy, suitability, 
safety, security, societal and ethical issues. 

SIMS 201. Concepts of Information Management and 
Systems (3) Theoretical foundations of organization of 
information; cognitive structures and processing of data, 
information, knowledge, and understanding infonnation 
uses and users. The integrated and interdisciplinary nature 
of information science and computer science is introduced 
and developed through case studies and examples from 
concentration disciplines: business, education, commu- 
nication, and healthcare settings. Prerequisite: SCSC 
138. 

SIMS 211. Microcomputer Organization (3) Introduc- 
tion to the major features of operating system software, 
the primary functions of CPU's, bus architectures, 
secondary storage devices, peripheral devices, hardware 
and software configuration. The goal is the assembly 
and disassembly of microcomputer systems and instal- 
lation of operating systems, network operating systems, 
and applications software. Prerequisite: SCSC 138 or 
consent of instructor. 

SIMS 303. Organizational Informatics (3) Needs, uses 
and consequences of information in organizational con- 
texts, organizational types and characteristics, functional 
areas and business processes, information-based products 
and services, the use of and redefining role of information 
technology, sociotechnical structures, and the rise and 
transformation of infonnation-based industries. Prereq- 
uisite: SIMS 201 or consent of instructor. 

SIMS 305. Social Informatics (3) Key social research 
and perspectives on the use of information and commu- 
nication technologies, information ethics, relevant legal 
frameworks, popular and controversial uses of technology, 
digital divides, and multicultural issues of information 
management. Prerequisites: SIMS 303 or equivalent or 
consent of instructor. 

SIMS 345. Technical Presentation and Communication 

(3) Communication technologies in the workplace such as 
Power Point, Lotus, Freelance and HTML. Prerequisites: 
SCSC l38andSSPH201. 

SIMS346. Communication andNewTechnology(3) Under- 
standing the components of various technologies and their im- 
portance in infonnation management and dissem ination within 
and outside the organization. Prerequisite: SCSC 138. 

SIMS 347. Web page Construction (3) Design of user- 
layer Web pages using HTML, Java script. Flash, and 
Dreamweaver, featuring graphic preparation, layout and 
effective presentation of infonnation. Prerequisites: SIMS 
305 or SIMS 303 or consent of instructor. 



194 



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SIMS 399. Independent Study in Informatics (1-6) 

Directed and self-guided research into topics of interest in 
the field of informatics. May be repeated for a maximum 
of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

SIMS 415. E-Commerce and the Internet (3) Coordina- 
tion and cultural challenges, value creation opportunities, 
and infomiation management issues associated with vari- 
ous forms of electronic commerce including electronic 
data interchange, the World Wide Web, and the Internet 
in today's global economy. Prerequisite: SCSC 315 or 
consent of instructor. 

SIMS 421. Data Warehousing and Decision Support 
SystemsTechnology (3) Data warehousing, online analytical 
processing, and decision support systems. Topics include 
design and architectural issues, cost effectiveness, manage- 
ment concerns, data integrity, deployment, and maintenance 
issues. Prerequisite: SCSC 325 or consent of instructor. 

SIMS 422. Knowledge Inference Systems & Applica- 
tions (3) Knowledge representation, intelligent decision 
systems, uncertainty and inexact knowledge, principals of 
rule-based systems, action rules, interestingness measures, 
usability evaluation. Select study of actual systems and 
applications in specific domains such as: medicine, busi- 
ness, communications, and education. Prerequisite: SIMS 
42 1 or consent of instructor. 

SIMS 423. Human-Machine Interaction (3) Concepts 
of interaction and how people acquire, store and use data 
including interface analysis and creation, human factors 
in perception, pattern recognition, speech recognition, 
attention, memory and expectation. Prerequisite: Senior 
standing or consent of instructor. 

SIMS 440. Business Process Re-engineering & Work- 
flow (3) Information technology and communication 
requirements of, and cultural or social issues pertaining 
to, the flow of work through distributed information 
management processes in business and other organiza- 
tions. Students in the Healthcare Informatics application 
area focus on applications in the healthcare setting. 
Prerequisites: SIMS 4 1 5 and senior standing or consent 
of instructor. 

SIMS 441. IT Project Management (3) Breakdown, 
estimation, leadership of a diverse team, and the use of 
tools to ensure the completion of deli verables within budget 
and on schedule. Students in the Healthcare Informatics 
application area focus on applications in the healthcare 
setting. Prerequisites: SIMS 415 and senior standing or 
consent of instructor. 

SIMS 450. Executive IT Management (3) Issues and 
challenges facing IT executives including IT alignment 
and governance, consensus, executive leadership, over- 
sight, retum-on-investment analysis, project manage- 
ment, and risk management. Students in the Healthcare 
Informatics application area focus on applications in the 
healthcare setting. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent 
of instructor. 



SIMS 496. Special Topics in Informatics (1-6) Current 
trends, events, software, hardware, and issues in informat- 
ics, infomiation technology, and infomiation management. 
May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Pre- 
requisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor. 

SIMS 498. Experiential Learning in Information Man- 
agement and Systems (3) The application of learning in 
a professional setting. To complement and strengthen the 
Infomiation Management and Systems academic program, 
students will complete a planned program of observation, 
study, and work in selected organizations with information 
management and systems offices. Student will have an 
opportunity to apply and articulate what they have learned 
in the classroom. Prerequisites: IMS major, senior standing 
and approval of instructor. Pass/fail credit. 

SIMS 499. Senior Seminar in Information Manage- 
ment and Systems (3) Integration of knowledge in 
infomiation management and systems. Students will 
study and evaluate current innovations in technology 
and current applications of these systems. Case studies 
involving infomiation systems technology will be used. 
Students will research and present new trends in technol- 
ogy. Students will experience an intensive and practice 
exercise in scholarship production. Class discussion will 
foster effective and creative implementation of research 
strategies, writing abilities, documentation procedures, 
portfolio development, and presentational skills. Students 
in the Healthcare Informatics application area focus on 
applications in the healthcare setting. Prerequisite: Senior 
standing or consent of instructor. 

Journalism (SJOU) 

SJOU 201. Survey of Mass Communications (3) Survey 
of the principles, philosophies, policies and practices of 
the mass media with an overview of the print media, the 
broadcast media, and advertising/public relations. Pre- 
requisite: SEGL 102. 

SJOU 302. History of Journalism (3) The development 
of mass media from the colonization of America to the 
present. The interrelationships between print media and 
American social, cultural, economic and political issues 
are explored, with some examination of how these inter- 
relationships influenced the development of twentieth 
century non-print media. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SJOU 303. Law and Ethics of the Mass Media (3) South 
Carolina and federal law relating to mass communications, 
the Internet, and the ethics of the journalistic profession. 
Prerequisite: SJOU 201 or consent of instructor. 

SJOU 304. Writing for the Media (3) Writing for print, 
broadcasting, public relations, the Internet, both news 
and non-news. Using word processors, students prepare 
exercise and copy both in class and out of class on set 
deadlines. Prerequisite; SEGL 101. 

SJOU 305. Mass Communication Theory (3) The role 
of communication models such as the social learning 



Course Descriptions 
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195 



theory, agenda setting, and cultivation theory in explain- 
ing the processes and effects of mass communications. 
Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SJOU 310. Mass Media and Society (3) How mass 
media function and influence today's world. The interac- 
tion of mass media and contemporary culture is explored 
through an analysis of media examples. Prerequisite: 
SEGL 102. 

SJOU 325. Speech for Radio and Television (3) Prin- 
ciples, standards and skills for broadcast speech in varied 
formats. Focus areas include pronunciation, enunciation, 
rate of delivery, pitch, inflection, and use of appropriate 
terminology in scripted and ad lib delivery. Prerequisite: 
SSPH201. 

SJOU 328. Public Relations and Persuasion (3) An 

analysis of the influencing of public opinion by business, 
government, consumergroups, minorities, environmental- 
ists, and others. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SJOU 333. Newswriting and Reporting (3) Practices in 
print journalism. Students prepare copy in class against 
said deadlines. Prerequisite: SJOU 201. 

SJOU 334. Writing for Broadcasting (3) Writing com- 
mercials, news stories, interview programs, documentaries 
for radio, television and film. Using word processors, 
students prepare copy in class against deadlines. Prereq- 
uisite: SJOU 201. 

SJOU 335. Feature Writing (3) Focus on producing 
specialized articles on topics selected from such areas as 
public or community atTairs, business, entertainment, sci- 
ence, sports, medicine and education. Using word proces- 
sors, students prepare copy in class against set deadlines. 
Prerequisite: SJOU 201. 

SJOU 398. Special Topics in Journalism (3) A specific 
area or media field is explored relating to the professional 
responsibilities of the journalism student looking toward 
the career marketplace. Prerequisite: SJOU 201 . 

SJOU 424. History of American Broadcasting (3) The 

American system of broadcasting, with emphasis on the 
chronological, structural, economic, social, and cultural 
development of radio and television. Prerequisite: SEGL 
102. 

SJOU 430. Media Management (3) Procedures, prob- 
lems, and concerns relating to the administration and man- 
agement of media agencies - print, broadcast, advertising, 
and public relations. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SJOU 480. Minorities in the Media (3) An examina- 
tion of media's depiction of groups that are marginalized 
based on race, class and/or gender. The interactions and 
relationships among professional terminology, cultural 
implications, message construction, media analysis and 
community perceptions are explored. Prerequisite: 
SEGL 102. 



Logic (SLGC) 

SLGC 205. Introduction to Logic and Rhetoric (3) (= 
University 30 1 ) The identification and evaluation of reason- 
ing as it occurs in natural language uses. The techniques of 
carefijl reading and clear writing are demonstrated through 
the production of critical essays. Two lecture and one labo- 
ratory hour per week. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SLGC 207. Deductive Logic (3) An examination of de- 
ductive arguments through the use of Aristotelian logic 
and propositional logic. 

SLGC 208. Inductive Logic (3) The nature of argu- 
ments expressing inductive inferences. Included are the 
problem of induction, the probability calculus, the logic 
of experimentation, statistical inference, and decision- 
making models. Prerequisite: SLGC 205 or consent of 
instructor. 

SLGC 307. Advanced Symbolic Logic (3) Advanced 
study of formal logic using propositional logic and 
predicate calculus. Prerequisite: SLGC 207 or consent 
of instructor. 

Mathematics (SMTH) 

Note: The appropriate entry level in mathematics is de- 
termined by the student s intended major and a mathematics 
placement examination given to all entering freshmen. Place- 
ment testing is also required for transfer students who have not 
completed their general education mathematics requirements. 

Majors in the natural or computer sciences or mathematics 
who have completed three years of college preparatoiy math- 
ematics and have demonstrated competence on the mathematics 
placement examination: should enroll in Mathematics 121, 126 
or 127 as appropriate. Students who need both college algebra 
and trigonometiy have the option of taking Mathematics 121 
(with a grade of B or better) or 126. and Mathematics 127. 
Those who have demonstrated competence in college algebra 
can take Mathematics 127 to meet the calculus prerequisite. 
Upon successful completion of one of the precalculus options, 
students should enroll in Mathematics 141. Those who have 
completed four years of college preparatory mathematics, 
including trigonometry, and have demonstrated competence 
on the mathematics placement examination, should enroll in 
Mathematics 141. 

Students not majoring in the natural or computer sciences, 
who have successfully completed high school Algebra land II, and 
have demonstrated competence on the mathematics placement 
examination, should enroll as follows: business administration 
majors in the Mathematics 121. 122 sequence: elementary, early 
childhood, and special education majors in Mathematics 121, 
and 231: other majors in a mathematics course determined by 
their advisors. 

SMTH 1 02. Elementary Statistics (3) The fundamentals 
of modem statistical methods, descriptive and inferential 
statistics, probability and sampling; primarily for students 
in fields other than mathematics who need a working 
knowledge ofstatistics. Prerequisites: high school Algebra 
I and n, or equivalent. 

SMTH 120. College Mathematics (3) Linear equations 
and inequalities, exponential equations, mathematics of 



196 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



finance, fundamental set theory, fundamentals of prob- 
ability and statistics. This course may not be used to 
satisfy any prerequisite requirement for higher-numbered 
mathematics courses. Prerequisites: appropriate score on 
placement test and high school Algebra I and II. 

SMTH 121. College Algebra (3) Equations and in- 
equalities, graphing, polynomial, rational, exponential, 
logarithmic, and other functions; matrices and systems 
of equations. Only one of SMTH 121 and 126 may be 
used to satisfy a mathematics requirement for general 
education or major credit. Prerequisites: appropriate score 
on placement test and high school Algebra I and II. For 
students who need a more intensive study, an expanded 
version of college algebra (SMTH 121 A) is available. 
SMTH 1 2 1 A is open to students who have an appropriate 
score on the placement test, have completed SMTH 120 
with the mandatory lab, or if the student, in consultation 
with his or her advisor, determines that extra instruction 
is needed in order to succeed in SMTH 121. 

SMTH 122. Calculus for Management and Social Sci- 
ences (3) Derivatives and integrals of elementary algebraic, 
exponential and logarithmic functions; maxima, minima, 
rate of change, area under a curve, and volume. Problems 
and examples are drawn from a variety of areas which 
include economics, psychology, biology, geography, and 
geology. Prerequisite: SMTH 121, 126 or eligibility for 
exemption from SMTH 121. 

SMTH 126. Precalculus I (3) Subsets of the real number 
line; polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential and 
logarithmic relations and functions. Only one of SMTH 1 2 1 
and 1 26 may be used to satisfy a mathematics requirement 
for general education or major credit. Prerequisites: appro- 
priate score on placement test and three years of college 
preparatory mathematics; or a "C" or better in Mathematics 
099 and three years of college preparatory mathematics. 

SMTH 127. Precalculus 11 (3) Trigonometric fianctions, 
trigonometric identities, solution of equations and triangles, 
inverse trigonometric fijnctions, vectors, polar coordinates; 
analytic geometry. Prerequisite: appropriate score on 
placement exam or consent of instructor. Prerequisite or 
Corequisite: SMTH 126. 

SMTH 141. Calculus I (4) Limits, continuity, the de- 
rivative, differentiation with applications in the natural 
sciences and engineering, antiderivatives, basic integrals 
with applications. Prerequisites: appropriate score on 
placement test and 4 years of college preparatory math- 
ematics including trigonometry; or C or better in both 
SMTH 126 and 127; or consent of instructor. 

SMTH 142. Calculus II (4) Applications of integration, 
techniques ofintegration, differential equations, parametric 
equations, and finite sequences and series. Prerequisite: 
SMTH 141 or its equivalent. 

SMTH 174. Elements of Discrete Mathematics (3) 

Topics in basic logic; proof techniques; sets, relations, 
and functions; counting; and elementary number theor>'. 



Prerequisite: high school precalculus, or SMTH 126 or 
equivalent, or consent of the instructor. 

SMTH 202. Elementary Statistics H (3) An expansion 
of topics taught in the first semester of elementary sta- 
tistics such as hypothesis testing; inferences; correlation 
and regression. Additional topics to be covered include: 
multinomial experiments and contingency tables; analysis 
of variance; statistical process control; and individual 
projects. Prerequisites: SMTH 102, or SEC0 291,or 
SSOC201,orSPSY225. 

SMTH 23 1 . Basic Concepts of Elementary Mathemat- 
ics I (3) The meaning of number, fundamental operations 
of arithmetic, the structure of the real number system and 
its subsystems, elementary number theory. Open only to 
students in early childhood, elementary, middle grades, or 
special education. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in 
SMTH 121 or higher, not including statistics, or consent 
of the instructor. 

SMTH 232. Basic Concepts of Elementary Mathemat- 
ics H (3) A continuation of the development of the real 
number system and its subsystems, basic concepts of 
probability, and elementary data analysis. Open only to 
students in early childhood, elementary, middle grades, 
or special education. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better 
in SMTH 231 or consent of the instmctor. 

SMTH 233. Geometry and Measurement (3) A study of 
properties and relationships of shape, size, and symmetry 
in two and three dimensions; explorations of concepts of 
motion in two and three dimensions through transforma- 
tions. Open only to students in early childhood, elementary, 
middle grades, or special education. Prerequisite: SMTH 
23 1 or higher with a grade of C or better, or consent of 
the instructor. 

SMTH 241. Calculus HI (4) Vectors and geometry of 
space, vector functions, partial derivatives, multiple 
integration, vector calculus and second order differential 
equations. Prerequisite: C or better in SMTH 142 or its 
equivalent; or consent of instructor. 

SMTH 244 . Calculus IV (3) Geometry of three-dimen- 
sional space, vectors, partial differentiation, cylindrical 
and spherical coordinates, and multiple integration. Pre- 
requisite: SMTH 243. 

SMTH 245. Elementary Differential Equations (3) 

Ordinary differential equations of first order, higher or- 
der linear equations, Laplace transform methods, series 
methods; numerical solutions of differential equations; 
applications to the physical sciences and engineering. 
Prerequisite: SMTH 241. 

SMTH 315. Statistical Methods I (3) Concepts and 
methods of statistics with emphasis on applications for 
those who desire a working knowledge of statistics; review 
of probability, sampling, and descriptive statistics; study 
of estimation of population parameters, testing statistical 
hypotheses, regression and correlation, and non-para- 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



197 



metric statistical tests. Prerequisite: SMTH 102 or 143, 
or SECO 291, or SSOC 201, or SPSY 225, or consent 
of the instructor 

SMTH 320. Mathematical Modeling (3) Graphs of 
functions as models, modeling using proportionality and 
geometric similarity, model fitting and models requiring 
optimization, experimental modeling, modeling using the 
derivative and interactive dynamic systems. Prerequisite: 
SMTH 141. 

SMTH 340. Mathematical Structures and Proof (3) 

Topics in set theory, logic, elementary application of logic, 
methods of mathematical proofs, equivalence relations and 
partial orderings, functions and mappings, and number 
systems. Prerequisite: SMTH 142. 

SMTH 344. Matrix Algebra (3) Matrices, systems of 
linear equations, vectors, Euclidean vector spaces, linear 
transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prereq- 
uisites: SMTH 142 or consent of instructor. 

SMTH 345. Applied Partial Differential Equations 

(3) Basic linear Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) of 
hyperbolic, parabolic, and elliptic types used in math- 
ematical modelling of physical, chemical, biological and 
other phenomena, systems, technical devices and financial 
markets. Selected topics such as the boundary value and 
initial value problems are covered. Prerequisite: C or 
better in SMTH 245 or consent of instructor. 

SMTH 346. Introduction to Modern Algebra (3) In- 
troduction to groups, rings and fields. Topics covered 
include permutations, Lagranges' theorem, the fundamental 
homomorphism theorem, Cayley's theorem, polynomial 
rings, and Abelian groups. Prerequisites: SMTH 340 or 
consent of instructor 

SMTH 354. Real Analysis I (3) Ordered field properties 
of the real number system; completeness; theory of limits 
of sequences, series and functions; continuity (including 
uniform continuity); introduction to theory of the deriva- 
tive. Prerequisites: SMTH 340; or Corequisite: SMTH 
340 and consent of instructor. 

SMTH 374. Theory of Discrete Mathematics (3) Top- 
ics selected from theoretical Boolean algebra, algebraic 
structures, theory of computing, advanced set theory, and 
recursivefijnctions. Prerequisites: SMTH 142, SMTH 174, 
or consent of the instructor. 

SMTH 399. Independent Study (1-9) 

SMTH 444. Elements of Optimization (3) The meth- 
ods of the numerical solutions of optimization problems 
arising in operational research, logistics, economics, etc. 
Emphasis is on the simplex and Karmarkar's polynomial- 
time method. Prerequisites: C or better in both SMTH 
241 and SMTH 344 or consent of instructor 

SMTH 501. History of Mathematics (3) A survey of the 
major developments and procedures of mathematics, from 



its origins to the modem era, relating development with the 
diverse cultures and the aspects of mathematics they contrib- 
uted. Prerequisites: SMTH 142 or consent of instructor 

SMTH 512. Probability and Statistics (3) Sample spaces 
and probability, conditional probability and independence, 
discrete and continuous random variables, probability 
distributions, expectations, correlation, sampling and sam- 
pling distributions, interval and point estimation, the law of 
large numbers, limiting distributions, and order statistics. 
Prerequisite: SMTH 241 or consent of the instructor 

SMTH 516. Statistical Methods II (3) Experimental de- 
sign, analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, multiple 
linearregression, and curvilinear regression. Prerequisite: 
SMTH 315 or consent of the instructor. 

SMTH 531. Foundations of Geometry (3) Geometry as a 
logical system based upon postulates and undefined terms; 
fundamental concepts and relations of Euclidean geometry 
developed rigorously on the basis of a set of postulates; 
some topics from non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: 
SMTH 340 or consent of the instructor 

SMTH 544. Linear Algebra (3) Vector spaces, and 
subspaces; bases and dimension; change of basis; linear 
transformations and their matrices; diagonalization; ca- 
nonical forms; bilinear forms; eigenspaces. Prerequisite: 
SMTH 340, SMTH 344. 

SMTH 546. Algebraic Structures (3) Advanced topics in 
groups, rings and fields. These topics include polynomial 
rings, ideals, integral domains, extension field, isomor- 
phism theorems for groups, and p-groups. Prerequisite: 
SMTH 346. 

SMTH 552. Complex Variables (3) Complex numbers 
and functions, complex integration, Taylor and Laurent 
series, residues, and conformal mapping. Prerequisite: 
SMTH 340 or consent of the instructor. 

SMTH 554. Real Analysis II (3) Further development of 
the theory of differential and integral calculus including 
properties of the derivative and integral. Fundamental 
Theorem of Calculus, sequences and series of fiinctions. 
Prerequisite: SMTH 354. 

SMTH 560. Numerical Analysis I (3) (=SCSC 560) 

Difference calculus; direct and iterative techniques for 
matrix inversion; eigenvalue problems; numerical solu- 
tions of initial value problems in ordinary differential 
equations; stability; error analysis; laboratory applica- 
tions. Prerequisites: SMTH 245, 344 and programming 
competency. 

SMTH 561. Numerical Analysis II (3) The finite-differ- 
ence and finite element methods for the numerical solution 
of basic linear Partial Differential Equations ( PDEs) arising 
in mathematical modelling of physical, chemical, biologi- 
cal and other phenomena, systems, technical devices and 
financial markets. Prerequisites: C or better in both SMTH 
345 and SMTH 560; or consent of instructor 



198 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



SMTH 579. Introduction to Industrial Mathematics (3) 

Basic applications of PDEs, numerical methods for PDEs 
and scientific computing to applied problems arising in 
the natural sciences, industry, and financial engineering. 
Emphasis is on the formulation and solution of problems 
of heat transfer and diffusion equations. Maxwell's equa- 
tions and differential equations governing the financial 
derivatives. Prerequisite: C or better in both SMTH 345 
and SMTH 561 or consent of instructor. 

SMTH 598. Topics in Mathematics (3) Intensive study 
in an area of pure or applied mathematics such as math- 
ematical modeling. Topics are selected to meet current 
faculty and student interest. Prerequisite: SMTH 241 and 
consent of the instructor. 

SMTH 599. Seminar in Mathematics (3) Recent devel- 
opments in pure and applied mathematics at an advanced 
level; ethical issues; and experience in research and oral 
presentation. Prerequisite: Senior Standing. Prerequisites 
orcorequisites: SMTH 344, SMTH 346, and either SMTH 
315 or SMTH 512. 

Military Science (SMIL) 

Note: Militaiy Science offers a Basic Program and Ad- 
vanced Program. There are no prerequisites for the courses 
offered under the Basic Program. Courses may be taken in 
any order, but it is recommended that the WO-level courses be 
taken prior to the 200-level courses. Prerequisites for entering 
the Advanced Program inchide one of the following: satisfac- 
tory completion ofsi.x semester hours in the Basic Program, 90 
contact hours in ROTC activities, substitute militaiy experience 
(Basic Training/Advanced Individual Training), or three years 
ofJROTC. Successful completion of the Advanced Program, 
together with a college degree, qualifies the graduate for either 
a Reserve or Regular Army Commission as a Second Lieutenant 
in the U.S. Army. Advanced Program students are required to 
participate in the weekly Mililary Science Lab. Students in the 
basic program are encouragedto participate in the department's 
adventure training. 

Basic Program 

SMIL 101. Introduction to Leadership I (1) Competen- 
cies critical for effective leadership. Cadets learn life skills, 
such as critical thinking, goal setting, time management, 
physical fitness, and stress management related to lead- 
ership, ofificership, and the army profession. Focus is on 
developing basic knowledge and comprehension of army 
leadership dimensions while gaining an understanding of 
the Reserve Officer Training Course ( ROTC ), its purpose 
for the army, and its advantages for the cadet. Open to 
all freshmen. 

SMIL 1 02. Introduction to Leadership 11(1) Leadership 
fimdamental such as setting direction, problem solving, 
listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and us- 
ing effective writing skills. Cadets explore dimensions 
of leadership values, attributes, skills, and actions in the 
context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises. 
Open to all freshmen. 

SMIL 141. Leadership Lab (1) Application of skills ac- 
quired in assigned military science classes. Leadership labs 



meet for 3 hours per week at varying off-campus locations to 
maximize training opportunities. The labs are sequential and 
progressive in nature, and correspond with every level of the 
military science classes. Lab participation is mandatory for 
all contracted cadets regardless of academic classification. 
Open to all students enrolled in military science courses. 
Course may be repeated for additional credit. 

SMILlOl.FoundationsofLeadership I (2) Dimensions 

of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and 
styles. Cadets study team dynamics and historical leader- 
ship theories that form the basis of the army leadership 
framework and learn techniques of personal motivation 
and team building in the context of planning, executing 
and assessing team exercises. Cadets are encouraged to 
participate in leadership labs to demonstrate comprehen- 
sion of class materials. Focus is on continues development 
of the knowledge of leadership values and attributes 
through an understanding of rank, structure, and duties, 
and basic aspects of tactics and land navigation. Open to 
all sophomores. 

SMIL 202. Foundations of Leadership II (2) Team- 
building and leadership theory, personal communications 
skills, team goal-setting and time-management skills. 
Cadets will explore the conduct of tactical operations at 
small unit levels. As potential army officers, cadets will be 
challenged to study, practice, and execute army leadership 
and values as they become more familiar with the army. 
Participation in leadership labs is highly encouraged for 
all enrolled cadets. Open to all sophomores. 

Advanced Program 

SMIL 301. Tactical Leadership (3) The study, practice, 
and evaluation of adaptive leadership skills as they are pre- 
sented with the demands of preparing for the ROTC Leader 
Development Assessment Course (LDAC). Challenging 
scenarios related to small unit tactical operations are used 
to develop self awareness and critical thinking skills. Cadets 
analyze and evaluate their own leadership attributes, skills, 
and actions. Primary attention is given to preparation for 
LDAC and development of leadership abilities. Open to 
contracted juniors and seniors only. Prerequisites: SMIL 
202 or consent of Professor of Military Science. 

SMIL 302. Applied Leadership (3) Intense situational 
leadership challenges to build cadet awareness and skills 
in leading tactical operations. Cadets review aspects of 
combat, stability, and support operations. Cadets also con- 
duct military briefings and develop proficiency in garrison 
operation orders. The focus is on exploring, evaluating 
and developing skills in decision making, persuading, and 
motivating team members in the contemporary operating 
environment. Open to contracted junior and graduate 
students only. Prerequisites: SMIL 301 or consent of 
Professor of Military Science. 

SMIL 401. Developmental Leadership (3) Planning, 
executing, and assessing complex operations. Cadets fiinc- 
tion as staff members and provide leadership performance 
feedback to subordinates. Cadets are given situational 
opportunities to assess risk, make ethical decisions, and 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



199 



provide mentorship to subordinate cadets. Participants 
are responsible for analyzing and evaluating the leader- 
ship values, attributes, skills, and actions of military sci- 
ence cadets while simultaneously evaluating their own 
leadership skills. Attention is given to preparation for 
future military assignments. Open to contracted seniors 
and graduate students only. Prerequisites: SMIL 302 or 
consent of Professor of Military Science. 

SMIL 402. Adaptive Leadership II (3) The dynamics of 
leading in complex ongoing military operations in the cur- 
rent operating environment. Cadets examine differences in 
customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and 
rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. 
They also explore aspects of interacting with governmental 
organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation 
support. Significant emphasis is on preparing cadets for 
their first units of assignment. Pen to contracted senior 
and graduate students only. Prerequisites: SMIL 401 or 
consent of Professor of Military Science. 

Music Education (SMUE) 

SMUE 354. Music for Elementary and Middle Schools 

(3) The integration of music into the elementary and middle 
school curriculum. An holistic approach to music as per- 
sonal expression, aesthetic perception, critical analysis, 
and music as it influences cultural heritage. 

Music History and Literature (SMUS) 

SMUS 110. Introduction to Music (3) Comprehensive 
appreciation of music through intelligent listening to rep- 
resentative masterpieces of the various periods of musical 
composition. No previous study of music is required. Three 
class hours per week. 

SMUS 111 A. Applied Music in Bass ( 1 ) Individual study 
in bass performance requiring weekly 30-minute lessons 
for twelve weeks and an additional four hours per week 
of practice. An additional fee is assessed. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor. Auditions may be required. PLEASE 
NOTE: Students who withdraw from this course will not 
receive a tuition or fee reimbursement or refund. 

SMUS 1 1 1 B. Applied Music in Trombone ( 1 ) Individual 
study in trombone performance requiring weekly 30- 
minute lessons for twelve weeks and an additional four 
hours per week of practice. An additional fee is assessed. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Auditions may be 
required. PLEASE NOTE: Students who withdrawfrom 
this course will not receive a tuition or fee reimbursement 
or refund. 

SMUS HID. Applied Music in Percussion (1) Individual 

study in percussion perfonnance requiring weekly 30- 
minute lessons for twelve weeks and an additional four 
hours per week of practice. An additional fee is assessed. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instnictor. Auditions may be 
required. PLEASE NOTE: Students who withdrawfrom 
this course will not receive a tuition or fee reimbursement 
or refund. 



SMUS Ills. Applied Music in Saxophone (1) Individual 
study in saxophone perfonnance requiring weekly 30-minute 
lessons for twelve weeks and an additional four hours per 
week of practice. An additional fee is assessed. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor Auditions may be required. PLEASE 
NOTE: Students who withdraw from this course will not 
receive a tuition or fee reimbursement or refund. 

SMUS HIT. Applied Music in Trumpet (1) Individual 
study in trumpet performance requiring weekly 30-minute 
lessons for twelve weeks and an additional four hours per 
week ofpractice. An additional fee is assessed. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor. Auditions may be required. PLEASE 
NOTE: Students who withdraw fi'om this course will not 
receive a tuition or fee reimbursement or refund. 

SMUS HIV. Applied Music in Voice (1) Individual study 

in voice perfonnance requiring weekly 30-minute lessons 
for twelve weeks and an additional four hours per week of 
practice. An additional fee is assessed. Prerequisite: Con- 
sent of instructor. Auditions may be required. PLEASE 
NOTE: Students who withdraw from this course will not 
receive a tuition or fee reimbursement or refund. 

SMUS 125. MusicTheory (3) Materials of music includ- 
ing basic elements through triads, seventh chords, and 
modulation. Exercises in writing and analysis of music 
with emphasis on common practice. 

SMUS 126. Vocal Jazz Ensemble (1) Perfonnance and 
instniction in the vocal jazz idiom. Rehearsals, clinics, 
and perfonnances are designed to increase the students 
knowledge of the jazz language. Prerequisite: Basic music 
reading skills and performance ability commensurate with 
music to be performed. Auditions may be required. May 
be repeated for additional credit. 

SMUS 127. Jazz Band (1) Rehearsal and performance 
of jazz literature. Prerequisite: Basic music reading skills 
and performance ability commensurate with music to be 
perfonned. Auditions may be required. May be repeated 
for additional credit, 

SMUS 128. Gospel Music Workshop (1) The directed 
performance of traditional and contemporary gospel music , 
No audition or prior experience is necessary, 

SMUS 129. University Singers (l)Perfonningchorus for 
men and women. No previous experience required. 

SMUS 130G. Applied Music in Guitar (1) Individual 
study in guitar performance requiring weekly 30-minute 
lessons for twelve weeks and an additional four hours per 
week of practice. An additional fee is assessed. Prereq- 
uisite: Perfonnance ability commensurate with music to 
be perfonned and consent of instructor. Auditions may be 
required. May be repeatedforadditional credit, PLEASE 
NOTE: Students who withdrawfrom this course will not 
receive a tuition or fee reimbursement or refund. 

SMUS OOP. Applied Music in Piano(l) Individual study 

in piano performance requiring weekly 30-minute lessons 



200 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



for twelve weeks and an additional four hours per week 
of practice. An additional fee is assessed. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor. Auditions may be required. PLEASE 
NOTE; Students who withdraw from this course will not 
receive a tuition or fee reimbursement or refund. 

SMUS 131. Guitar Ensemble (1) Rehearsal and perfor- 
mance of guitar ensemble literature including jazz, pop, 
and classical genres. Students gain experience through 
rehearsals, clinics, and live perfomiance. Prerequisite: 
Basic music reading skills and performance ability com- 
mensurate with music to be performed. Students must 
provide theirown instruments. Auditions may be required. 
May be repeated for additional credit. 

SMUS 1 32. Chamber Choir (1 ) Rehearsal and performance 
of vocal and choral literature that is representative of vari- 
ous musical eras. Students will rehearse and study various 
techniques required for performance of choral literature not 
normally associated with larger choirs. Prerequisite: Perfor- 
mance ability commensurate with music to be performed 
and consent of instructor. Auditions may be required. 

SMUS 133. Pep Band (1) Rehearsal and perfomiance of 
pep band literature including traditional and contemporary 
genres. Students gain experience through rehearsals, clin- 
ics, and live perfomiance. Prerequisite: Basic music reading 
skills and perfomiance ability commensurate with music 
to be performed. Auditions may be required. 

SMUS 140. History of Rocli Music (3) Representative 
artists, cultural significance, and classic recordings in the 
development of rock music. 

SMUS 155, 156, 255, 256. Group Piano (2,2,2,2) Piano 
technique including sight-reading, rhythmic studies, and 
piano literature from simple to advanced. The individual 
needs of students are considered in the levels of materials 
studied and performed. 

SMUS 165, 166, 265, 266. Class Voice (2,2,2,2) Vocal 
technique including tone production, diaphragmatic breath- 
ing, technical studies, and song literature. The individual 
needs of students are considered in the levels of material 
assigned and perfomied. Corequisite: SMUS 129. 

SMUS 265, 266. Class Voice (2,2) Vocal techniques 
including tone production, diaphragmatic breathing, tech- 
nical studies, and song literature. The individual needs of 
students are considered in the level of material assigned 
and perfomied. Corequisite: SMUS 1 29. 

SMUS 301. Music History I (3) A review of music from 
the Middle Ages through the classic era of the early nine- 
teenth century focusing on composers and musical genres. 
Prerequisite: SEGL 102 or consent of instructor. 

SMUS 302. Music History II (3) A review of music from 
the early nineteenth century through contemporary music 
focusing on composers and musical genres. Prerequisite: 
SEGL 102 or consent of instructor. 
SMUS 310. Jazz History (3) Origin, development, and 



styles of jazz music and its exponents. Cultivation of 
special listening techniques. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SMUS 3 1 1 A. Applied Music in Bass ( I ) Individual study 
in bass performance requiring weekly 30-minute lessons 
for twelve weeks and an additional four hours per week 
of practice. An additional fee is assessed. Prerequisite: 
Intermediate to advanced perfomiance ability and con- 
sent of instructor. Auditions may be required. May be 
repeated for additional credit. PLEASE NOTE: Students 
who withdraw from this course will not receive a tuition 
or fee reimbursement or refund. 

SMUS311B.Applied Music inTrombone(l) Individual 

study in trombone performance requiring weekly 30- 
minute lessons for 12 weeks and additional four hours 
per week of practice. An additional fee is assessed. Pre- 
requisite: Intermediate to advanced performance ability 
and consent of instructor. Auditions may be required. 
May be repeated for additional credit. PLEASE NOTE: 
Students who withdraw from this course will not receive 
a tuition or fee reimbursement or refund. 

SMUS 3 1 1 D. Applied Music in Percussion (1 ) Individual 
study in percussion perfomiance requiring weekly 30- 
minute lessons for twelve weeks and an additional four 
hours per week of practice. An additional fee is assessed. 
Prerequisite: Intermediate to advanced perfomiance abil- 
ity and consent of instmctor. Auditions may be required. 
May be repeated for additional credit. PLEASE NOTE: 
Students who withdraw from this course will not receive 
a tuition or fee reimbursement or refund. 

SMUS 311G. Applied Music in Guitar (1) Individual 
study in guitar perfomiance requiring weekly 30-minute 
lessons for twelve weeks and an additional four hours per 
week of practice. An additional fee is assessed. Prereq- 
uisite: Intemiediate to advanced perfomiance ability and 
consent of instmctor. Auditions may be required. Maybe 
repeated for additional credit. PLEASE NOTE: Students 
who withdraw from this course will not receive a tuition 
or fee reimbursement or refund. 

SMUS 311P. Applied Music in Piano (1) Individual 
study in piano performance requiring weekly 30-niinute 
lessons for twelve weeks and an additional four hours per 
week of practice. An additional fee is assessed. Prereq- 
uisite: Intemiediate to advanced performance ability and 
consent of instructor. Auditions may be required. Maybe 
repeated for additional credit. PLEASE NOTE: Students 
who withdraw from this course will not receive a tuition 
or fee reimbursement or refund. 

SMUS311S.Applied Music in Saxophone(l) Individual 
study in saxophone performance requiring weekly 30- 
minute lessons for twelve weeks and an additional four 
hours per week of practice. An additional fee is assessed. 
Prerequisite: Intemiediate to advanced perfomiance abil- 
ity and consent of instructor. Auditions may be required. 
May be repeated for additional credit. PLEASE NOTE: 
Students who withdraw from this course will not receive 
a tuition or fee reimbursement or refund. 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



201 



SMUS 311T. Applied Music in Trumpet (1) Individual 
study in trumpet performance requiring weeivly 30-minute 
lessons for twelve weeks and an additional four hours per 
week of practice. An additional fee is assessed. Prereq- 
uisite: Intermediate to advanced performance ability and 
consent of instructor. Auditions may be required. May be 
repeated for additional credit. PLEASE NOTE: Students 
who withdraw from this course will not receive a tuition 
or fee reimbursement or refund. 

SMUS311V. Applied Music in Voice (1) Individual study 

in voice perfomiance requiring weekly 30-minute lessons 
for twelve weeks and an additional four hours per week 
of practice. An additional fee is assessed. Prerequisite: 
Intermediate to advanced perfonnance ability and con- 
sent of instructor. Auditions may be required. May be 
repeated for additional credit. PLEASE NOTE: Students 
who withdraw from this course will not receive a tuition 
or fee reimbursement or refund. 

SMUS 322. Chamber Choir (1) Small performing vocal 
group for men and women. Prerequisite: Intennediate 
music reading and perfonnance ability commensurate 
with music to be performed. Auditions required. 

SMUS 325. Jazz Theory (3) Technical aspects of jazz 
improvisation including harmonic substitutions, chord/ 
scale relationships, analysis of harmonic progressions and 
solos, forms, piano voicings, and ear training. Prerequisite: 
Basic music reading ability. 

SMUS 326. Vocal Jazz Ensemble (1) Performance and 
instruction in the vocal jazz idiom. Rehearsals, clinics, 
and performances are designed to increase the student's 
knowledge of the jazz language. Prerequisite: Intennediate 
music reading skills and performance ability commensurate 
with music to be performed. Auditions may be required. 

SMUS 327. Jazz Band (1) Rehearsal and performance 
of jazz literature. Prerequisite: Intermediate music read- 
ing, performance ability commensurate with music to be 
performed, and consent of instructor. Auditions may be 
required. May be repeated for additional credit. Intended 
for students pursuing a Jazz Studies minor. 

SMUS 328. Gospel Music Workshop (1) The directed 
performance of traditional and contemporary gospel 
music. Prerequisite: Previous gospel choir experience 
and performance ability commensurate with music to be 
performed. Auditions may be required. 

SMUS 331. Guitar Ensemble (1) Rehearsal and perfor- 
mance of guitar ensemble literature includingjazz, pop, and 
classical genres. Prerequisite: Intennediate music reading 
skills and performance ability commensurate with music 
to be performed. Auditions may be required. 

SMUS 333. Pep Band (1) Rehearsal and performance of 
pepband literature, including traditional and contemporary 
genres. Students gain experience through rehearsals, clin- 
ics, and live performance. Prerequisite: Intermediate music 
reading skills and performance ability commensurate with 



music to be performed. Auditions may be required. 

SMUS 345. Jazz I mprovisation I (3) Principles of improvi- 
sation including idiomatic chord progressions, blues scales, 
patterns, melodic development, and tune styles. This is 
primarily a lecture class; however, students may be required 
to demonstrate improvisational skills on their instrument. 
Prerequisite: SMUS 325 or consent of instructor. 

SMUS 346. Jazz Improvisation II (3) Advanced prin- 
ciples of improvisation including idiomatic chord progres- 
sions, formal analysis of tunes, modal scales, melodic 
development, and aural skills. This is primarily a lecture 
class; however, students may be required to demonstrate 
improvisational skills on their instrument. Prerequisite: 
SMUS 345 or consent of instructor. 

SMUS 361. Music Business (3) Publishing, licensing, 
booking, copyrights, contracts, artist management, pro- 
motional materials, royalties, and press kits applicable to 
the music industry. Prerequisite: SEGL 102 or consent 
of instructor. 

SMUS 364. Music Entrepreneurship (3) Career choices 
and portfolio development in the commercial music 
industry. Prerequisite: Junior or senior class standing or 
permission of instructor. 

SMUS 398. Selected Topics in Music (3) Reading and research 
on selected topics in music. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 



Nonprofit Administration (SNPA) 

SNPA201. American Humanics Workshop (1) Applica- 
tion of nonprofit management principles through active 
participation in a student organization. May be repeated 
for a maximum of four semester hours. 

SNPA301. The Nonprofit Sector in the United States (3) 

The importance of the nonprofit sector in the United States 
emphasizing the history, the relationship to business and 
government and the place of the nonprofit sector within 
American society generally. Prerequisite: Sophomore 
standing (30 semester hours). 

SNPA302. Nonprofit Administration (3) The fundamen- 
tals of nonprofit administration to include leadership, legal 
foundations, board development, the role of volunteers, 
nonprofit advocacy and ethics. 

SNPA 303. Nonprofit Financial Administration (3) 

Financial management within the nonprofit sector em- 
phasizing strategic planning, budgeting, accountability, 
risk management and control. Prerequisite: SNPA 302 
or consent of instnictor. 

SNPA 304. Fund Raising for Nonprofit Organizations 

(3) Fundamentals of resource development in the nonprofit 
sector including strategic planning, principles of philan- 
thropy, proposal writing, event planning, and charitable 
trusts. Prerequisite: SNPA 302 or consent of instructor 



202 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



SNPA 399. Independent Study ( M) An individualized, con- 
tracted program of study planned in conjunction with a faculty 
member Prerequisites; SNPA 301 and consent of instructor 

SNPA 495. Nonprofit Senior Seminar (3) A capstone 
course in nonprofit administration emphasizing research 
and oral presentations. Prerequisites: SNPA 301, SNPA 
302. SNPA 303, SNPA 499. 

SNPA 499. Nonprofit Internship (1-6) Supervised work 
experience in a nonprofit organization. Forty-five hours of 
workforeach credithourare required. Prerequisites; SNPA 
301, junior or senior standing and consent of instructor. 



Nursing (SNUR) 

Note: SNUR 301 and SNUR 302 cnv open to all students. 

SNUR 301. Nutrition (3) Nutritional needs across the life 
span and related strategies for promotion and maintenance of 
health. Concepts include nutrients, food groups, nutritional 
guidelines, sociocultural influences, nutritional assessment, 
basic nutritional counseling, and common diet modifica- 
tions. Prerequisites; SBIO 242 or consent of instructor. 

SNUR 302. Pharmacology (3) Concepts underlying the 
pharmacotherapeutics ofmajordrugclassifications, including 
pharmacokinetics, phannacodynamics, adverse drug reac- 
tions, and ftindamental nursing decision making situations 
as related to pharmacology. Drug dosage computation is 
included. Prerequisite; SBIO 242 or consent of instructor. 

SNUR 399. Nursing Externship (3-8) A concentrated 
preceptored experience in nursing enabling the student to 
expand previous clinical practice experiences and further 
develop skills in clinical reasoning, critical thinking, or- 
ganization, and prioritization. For three externship credit 
hours, a minimum of 135 hours of scheduled clinical 
experiences, weekly seminars, and consultation with the 
instructor are required. A minimum of 45 hours for each 
additional credit hour is required. A student may repeat 
SNUR 399 once in a different clinical setting for a total 
of not more than eight hours of undergraduate credit. 
Prerequisites; SBSN 330, 330P, 340, 340P, 360, 360P, 
and 370. Pass/fail credit. 



Baccalaureate Nursing (SBSN) 

SBSN 305. Health Promotion Across the Life Span (3) 

Introduction to leading health indicators, emphasizing 
special health concerns based on gender, age, race, ethnic, 
origin in assisting self, individuals, and family to attain 
optimum health. Prerequisite; Completion of 6 hours 
in Group VIII General Education Requirement, with a 
minimum grade of C in each course. 

SBSN 306. Introduction to Professional Nursing (3) 

Concepts and theories that have shaped professional 
nursing practice. Prerequisite; Admission to the Bacca- 
laureate Nursing Program, Four- Year track. Prerequisite 
or Corequisite; SBSN 305. 



SBSN 310. Health Assessment (2) Comprehensive health 
assessment of well individual clients across the life span. 
Emphasis is on data collection as a basis for critical thinking 
in nursing practice. For Four- Year track. Prerequisite; Ad- 
mission to Baccalaureate Nursing Program; Prerequisite or 
Corequisite; SBSN 305. 306; Corequisite; SBSN 31 OP For 
RN track. Prerequisite; Admission to Baccalaureate Nursing 
Program, or consent of instructor, Corequisite; SBSN 3 1 OP. 

SBSN 3 1 OP. Health Assessment Practicum ( 1 ) Practice of 
concepts and skills used in comprehensive health assessment 
of well individual clients across the life span. Two campus 
laboratory hours per week. Corequisite: SBSN 3 1 0. 

SBSN 320P. Foundations of Nursing Practicum (3) 

Application of knowledge and skills to implement basic 
nursing care. Practicum experiences provide for application 
of cognitive and psychomotor skills. Six practicum hours 
per week. Prerequisite; Admission to the Baccalaureate 
Nursing Program, Four-Yeartrack; Prerequisites orCoreq- 
uisites; SBSN 305, 306; Corequisite: SBSN 325P 

SBSN 325P. Integrated Nursing Practicum (3) Implemen- 
tation of nursing process in health care environments for 
beginning integration of nursing knowledge and skills from 
health promotion, health assessment, nursing foundations, 
and introduction to professional nursing. Six practicum 
hours per week. Prerequisite: Admission to the Baccalau- 
reate Nursing Program, Four- Year track; Prerequisites or 
Corequisites; SBSN 305, 306: Corequisite: SBSN 320P 

SBSN 330. Health Alterations I (3) Evidence-based 
nursing practice with adults experiencing health altera- 
tions, moving from simple to complex states of health 
and levels of care. Prerequisites; SBSN 310, 310P, 320P, 
325R Corequisite; SBSN 330R 

SBSN 330P. Health Alterations I Practicum (2) Imple- 
mentation of evidence-based nursing practice, progressing 
in complexity, in a variety of settings with adults experi- 
encing health alterations. Four practicum hours per week. 
Corequisite; SBSN 330. 

SBSN 340. Nursing of Childbearing Families and 
Women's Health (3) Evidence-based nursing practice for 
women and parent-newborn dyad. Focus is on nursing 
interventions that promote, maintain and restore health of 
well and high-risk families during the childbearing process 
and women's health throughout the life span. Prerequisites 
or Corequisites; SBSN 330, 330P; Corequisites; SBSN 
310, 320R340R 

SBSN 340P. Nursing of Childbearing Families and 
Women's Health Practicum (2) Implementation of 
concepts and skills to provide for families throughout the 
childbearing process and women throughout their life span. 
Practicaare in traditional and non-traditional facilities. Four 
practicum hours per week. Corequisite; SBSN 340. 

SBSN 350. Professional Nursing Role Transition (3) 

Theories of nursing, systems, family, teaching-learning, 
practice, education, role and change that are central to cur- 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



203 



rent professional nursing practice. Prerequisite: Admission 
to the RN-BSN track. Corequisite: SBSN 350S. 

SBSN 350S. Professional Nursing Role Transition 
Seminar (3) Web-based seminar focusing on role devel- 
opment in health promotion strategies and technology 
including development of teaching plans, plans of care, 
and family assessment. Prerequisite; Admission to the 
RN-BSN track. Corequisite: SBSN 350. 

SBSN 360. Child Health Nursing (3) Evidence-based 
nursing practice for children. Emphasis is on health 
promotion, maintenance, and restoration, using a family- 
centered approach. Prerequisites or Corequisites: SBSN 
310, 330, 330P; Corequisite: SBSN 360P. 

SBSN 360P. Child Health Nursing Practicum (2) Imple- 
mentation of evidence-based nursing practice for children 
and their families, in both acute care and community settings. 
Four practicum hours per week. Corequisite: SBSN 360. 

SBSN 370. Nursing Research (3) Introduction to the 
language and underlying concepts as a basis for reading, 
understanding, and utilizing research as a source of evidence 
for guiding practice. For the Four- Year track. Prerequisites: 
SBSN 3 1 0, 3 1 OP, 320P, 325P For RN-BSN track, prereq- 
uisite: SBSN 350, or consent of instructor. 

SBSN 399. Independent Study (1-3) An individual 
learning experience in an area of special interest planned 
in conjunction with a nursing faculty member. For Four- 
Year track. Prerequisites: SBSN 330, 330R 340, 340R 
360, 360P; or consent of instructor. For RN-BSN track. 
Prerequisite: SBSN 350; or consent of instructor. 

SBSN 410. Health Alterations II (3) Builds upon Health 
Alterations 1 and continues to focus on evidence-based nursing 
practice, progressing in complexity, in a variety of settings 
with adults experiencing health alterations, moving from 
simple to complex states of health and levels of care. Six 
practicum hours per week. Prerequisites: SBSN 330, 330P. 
340, 340R 360, 360R 370. Corequisite: SBSN410R 

SBSN 410P. Health Alterations II Practicum (3) Builds 
upon Health Alterations I and related practicum and con- 
tinues implementation of evidence-based nursing practice, 
progressing in complexity, in a variety of settings with 
adults experiencing health alterations. Six practicum 
hours per week. Corequisite: SBSN 410. 

SBSN 411 P. Nursing Internship (2-4) A guided practi- 
cum experience utilizing clinical decision-making skills 
in a health care setting. For two internship credit hours, a 
minimum of 90 hours of scheduled clinical experiences, 
seminars, and consultation with faculty are required. A 
minimum of 45 hours for each additional credit hour is 
required. For Four-Year track. Prerequisites: SBSN 330, 
330R 340, 340R 360, 360R For RN-BSN track. Prereq- 
uisites: SBSN 3 10, 31 OR 350. 

SBSN 420. Current Topics in Nursing (3) Intensive 
study in a specialized area of professional nursing or a 



topic related to current health care practice. Selected area 
or topic is based on student interest and faculty expertise. 
Experiential learning activities may be required. For Four- 
Year track. Prerequisites: SBSN 330, 330R 340, 340R 
360, 360R 370; Prerequisites or Corequisites: SBSN 41 0, 
41 OR For RN Completion track. Prerequisites: SBSN 
350, 350S, 3 1 0, 3 1 OP; Prerequisite or Corequisite: SBSN 
370. Selected topics may be of interest to non-nursing 
majors. Non-nursing majors who have completed at 
least 60 credit hours, including completion of 6 hours 
of Group VIII General Education Requirements and one 
course which includes basic research methodology, and 
who have a collegiate summary GPA of 2.5 or higher may 
enroll with consent of the instructor. 

SBSN 430. Leadership in Nursing Practice (3) Prin- 
ciples of leadership, management, and foUowership as 
they relate to the role of the professional nurse within 
the sociopolitical health care system. Emphasis is on 
first level management, team leadership, client advocacy, 
communication, critical thinking, decision making, role 
development within the profession, theoretical models, 
cultural diversity, and ethical leadership issues. For Four- 
Year track. Prerequisites: SBSN 330, 330R 340, 340R 
360, 360R 370; Corequisites: SBSN 410, 410P For RN 
Completion track. Prerequisite: Admission to the BSN 
Program, Prerequisite or Corequisite: SBSN 350. 

SBSN 435P. Professional Nursing Role Transition 
Practicum (3) A preceptored practicum that provides 
opportunities for RN-BSN track students to expand their 
current level of practice by focusing on the concepts of 
leadership, management, and clinical role development 
in a healthcare setting of the student's choice. Identifica- 
tion of a project focus, analysis of professional roles and 
incorporation of evidence-based practice are included. 
Eight practicum hours per week. Prerequisite: SBSN 430. 
Prerequisite or Corequisite: SBSN 370. 

SBSN 441. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing (3) 

Evidence-based psychiatric mental health nursing prac- 
tice. Emphasis is on the promotion of mental health and 
prevention of mental illness, and on nursing interventions 
related to primary mental health alterations across the life 
span. Prerequisites: SBSN 330, 330R 340, 340R 360, 
360R370. Prerequisite or corequisites: SBSN 4 10, 41 OR 
430. Corequisite: SBSN 44 IP 

SBSN 441 P. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Practi- 
cum (3) Implementation of evidence-based psychiatric men- 
tal health nursing practice in a variety of settings. Emphasis 
is on promotion of mental health and prevention of mental 
illness and on nursing interventions with individuals and 
groups of clients experiencing mental health alterations. Six 
practicum hours per week. Corequisite: SBSN 441. 

SBSN 450. Health Alterations III (3) Builds upon Health 
Alterations 1 & 11 and continues to focus on evidence-based 
nursing practice with adults experiencing health alterations, 
moving from simple to complex states of health and levels 
of care. For Four- Year track. Prerequisites: SBSN 410, 
41 OP, 430, 441, 44 IP; Corequisite: SBSN 450R 



204 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



SBSN450P. Health Alterations riIPracticum(2)Builds 

upon Health Alterations Practica I & H and continues 
implementation of evidence-based nursing practice, pro- 
gressing in complexity, in a variety of settings with adults 
experiencing health alterations. Four practicum hours per 
week. Corequisite: SBSN 450. 

SBSN 461. Community and Public Health Nursing 

(3) Evidence-based nursing with individuals across the 
life-span, families and other diverse population groups. 
Levels of prevention are explored in relationship to epi- 
demiology and the effects of environment and life-style 
on client health. For Four- Year track. Prerequisites or 
Corequisites: SBSN 450, 450P,499P; Corequisite: 461P. 
ForRN-BSN track. Prerequisites: SBSN 310, 31 OP, 350. 
350S, 370; Corequisite: SBSN46IP. 

SBSN 461 P. Community and Public Health Nurs- 
ing Practicum (3) Implementation of evidence-based 
community and public health nursing practice in health 
promotion, maintenance, and restoration in individuals 
across the life-span, families, and other diverse population 
groups in community settings. Six practicum hours per 
week. Corequisite: SBSN 461. 

SBSN 497. Professional Nursing Issues (2) Critical 
exploration of interrelated historical, socio-political, and 
cultural issues impacting the professional nurse and the 
quality and delivery of health care. Prerequisite; final 
semester of the curriculum or consent of instructor. 

SBSN 498. Professional Nursing Role Transition 
Project (3) Synthesis of knowledge from nursing, arts, 
and sciences through completion of a change project for 
a health care setting. Prerequisite: SBSN 435P. 

SBSN 499P. Senior Practicum in Professional Nurs- 
ing (3) Capstone practicum, in a precepted setting, that 
provides opportunities to synthesize and apply knowledge 
and skills necessary to function as a beginning professional 
nurse. Emphasis is on the application of evidence-based 
knowledge in planning, delivering and evaluating nursing 
practice consisting of 1 24 hours of practicum. Prerequisites: 
SBSN 410, 41 OP, 420, 430, 441, 44 1 P. Prerequisites or 
Corequisites: SBSN 450, 450P, 46 1,46 IP, 497. Pass/fail 
credit. 



Philosophy (SPHL) 

SPHL 102. Introduction to Philosophy (3) Introduction 
to the main problems of philosophy and its methods of 
inquiry, analysis and criticism. Works of important phi- 
losophers are read. 

SPHL201. History of Ancient Philosophy (3) Introduction 

to the development of philosophy in the ancient world. 

SPHL202. History of Modem Philosophy (3) Introduction to 
the development of post-Renaissance philosophy with primary 
emphasis on the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 



SPHL2 1 1 . Contemporary Moral Issues (3) Moral issues 
confronting men and women in contemporary society. Top- 
ics vary but may include discussion of problems related to 
abortion, drugs, euthanasia, war, social engineering, and 
punishment of criminals. 

SPHL309. Philosophy of Mind (3) A study of traditional 
problems pertaining to understanding the concept of mind, 
for example, the mind-body relation, personal identity, 
and theories of consciousness. 

SPHL310. Ethics for the Professions (3) Critical exami- 
nation of selected moral issues and problems of current 
concern within the professions. Specific topics for study 
vary, but they are of special interest for the fields of medi- 
cine and health care, law and criminal justice, business, 
education and journalism. 

SPHL 311. Ethics (3) The moral principles of conduct 
and the basic concepts underlying these principles, such 
as good, evil, right, wrong, justice, value, duty and obli- 
gation. The ethical works of influential philosophers are 
analyzed in terms of these concepts. 

SPHL 319. Epistemology (3) The nature and founda- 
tions of knowledge with consideration of skepticism and 
problems of perception. 

SPHL321. Ethics of Computer and Information Tech- 
nology (3) Moral issues raised by the use of computer 
and information technology. Topics include privacy, 
property rights, freedom of expression, and social justice. 
Prerequisite: Junior level standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

SPHL 390. Topics in Philosophy (3) Selected topics in 
philosophy, planned around areas of interest. Prerequisite: 
junior or senior standing or consent of instructor. 

SPHL 500. Senior Seminar: Human Nature and Society 

(3) Selected philosophical topics from history, anthropol- 
ogy, sociology, psychology and politics. Prerequisite: 
Senior level standing or consent of instructor. 



Physical Education (SPED) 

SPED 120. Fundamentals of Movement and Body 
Conditioning ( 1 ) Development and improvement of basic 
axial and locomotor movements as they pertain to physical 
education activities with emphasis on agility, flexibility, 
strength and endurance through body conditioning. A 
fijndamental knowledge of various fitness programs and 
terminology is included. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 121. Golf (1) Skill development, playing strat- 
egy, knowledge of rules, scoring, and tournament play. 
Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 122. Tennis (1) Skill development, playing strat- 
egy, knowledge of rules, scoring, and tournament play. 
Pass/fail credit. 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



205 



SPED 1 23. Snow Skiing ( 1 ) Basic maneuvers of condition- 
ing, turning stopping, and selection and care of equipment 
and clothing. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 124. Walk/Jog/Run (1) Develop and carry out 
a personalized walking, jogging or running program by 
applying information on equipment selection, physiology, 
mechanics, psychology, training principles, conditioning, 
program guidelines, environmental concerns, nutritional 
guidelines, and injury prevention. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 125. Combatives (1) Skill development, strategy, 
knowledge of rules, scoring, and tournament competition 
in wrestling, judo, karate, and boxing. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 126. Introduction to SCUBA Diving (1) Basic 
techniques and skill development, care of equipment, 
and the principles and practices of safe SCUBA diving. 
Prerequisite: Ability to swim. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 127. Handball and Racquetball (1) Skill develop- 
ment, playing strategy, knowledge of rules, scoring, and 
tournament play. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 128. Aerobics (1) Participation and development 
of impact and low-impact aerobic routines. Selection of 
exercises and music are included. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 130. Bowling (1) Skill development, playing 
strategy, knowledge of rules, scoring, and tournament 
play. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 131. Badminton (1) Skill development, playing 
strategy, knowledge of rules, scoring, and tournament 
play. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 132. Basketball (1) Skill development, playing 
strategy, knowledge of rules, scoring, and tournament 
play. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 140. Adult Recreational Sports (1) Methods and 
materials for teaching activities of carry-over value adapt- 
able to junior and senior high facilities. Such activities as 
boating, fishing, hunting, camping, backpacking, skiing, 
and recreational games are included. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 141. Adventure Programming on a Ropes Course 

(1) Participation and development of specific group and 
individual attitudes and skills through the use of low and 
high elements of the USC Upstate ropes course. Pass/fail 
credit. 

SPED 142. Advanced Ropes Course Skills and Stan- 
dards (1) Advanced certification as ropes course facilita- 
tor. Knowledge and experience in the setup, spotting, and 
safety practices employed in state-of-the-art ropes course 
uses. Prerequisite: SPED 141. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 143. Outdoor Climbing and Rappelling(l) Skill 

development, safety, spotting, safety practices, and knowl- 
edge of and use of proper equipment. Pass/fail credit. 



SPED 180. Swimming (1) Skill development, basic 
strokes, elementary diving, knowledge of water and pool 
safety. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 200. Foundations of Physical Education (3) The 

scope of the physical education field, historical background, 
principles, philosophy, cuiTent issues, professional leader- 
ship and publications. 

SPED 223. Advanced Snow Skiing (1 ) Pole plant locafion, 
moguls, planning line, constant turns, and advanced trail 
skiing. Prerequisite: ability to snow ski. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 235. Dance and Gymnastics (3) Skills analysis, 
methods and techniques for organizing and teaching dance, 
gymnastics and tumbling, including opportunities for peer 
teaching experience. Prerequisite or corequisite: SPED 
200 or SREC 200 or consent of instructor. 

SPED 242. Principles of Recreation (3) The significance 
and meaning of leisure in modem society, theories of play, 
the recreational movement in the U.S., and programs of 
recreation in the school, community and industry. 

SPED 265. Officiating of Sports (3) Rules, officiating 
techniques, and problems arising in officiating, with em- 
phasis on major team sports. Students are encouraged to 
obtain official's rating. 

SPED 270. Introduction to Athletic Training (3) Safety 
precautions, injury prevention, laboratory experiences, 
and legal issues in physical education and athletics. Pre- 
requisite: SBIO 232. 

SPED 280. Swimming and Water Safety ( 1 ) The teaching 
of swimming and water safety, skill mastery, lifesaving, 
pool hygiene, management, and safety. For advanced 
swimmers. Pass/fail credit. 

SPED 301. Exercise Physiology (4) Physiological prin- 
ciples as applied to muscular activity and the effects of 
muscular activity on the human organism. Three class 
and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: SBIO 
232; SHED 221. 

SPED 302. Biomechanics (3) Theory and techniques for 
analyzing motor pertbrmance, including cinematography, 
segmental analysis, and fundamentals of physical skills 
based on the laws and principles of mechanical and neu- 
romuscular action. Prerequisite: SBIO 232. 

SPED 304. Motor Learning and Development (3) Pro- 
cesses associated with acquisition of psychomotor skill 
and the neuromuscular function involved in the control of 
movement. The application of the developmental processes 
as it relates to motor learning is also explored. A practicum 
is required. Prerequisites SPED 200, SBIO 232. 

SPED 312. Teaching of Physical Education (4) Ori- 
entation to teaching physical education in grades 6-12. 
Emphasis is on teaching styles, methods and curriculum. 
A practicum in the public schools is required. Prereq- 



206 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



uisites: SPED 200, SHED 221, junior standing, and 
Physical Education majors only, or consent of instructor. 
Corequisite: SPED 320. 

SPED 320. Team Sports I (3) Methods and materials 
for planning, teaching, and assessing the following team 
sports: basketball, volleyball, and flag football. Prerequi- 
sites: SPED 200 or SREC 200, SHED 22 1 , and Physical 
Education majors only, or consent of instructor. 

SPED 390. Field Experience (1-3) School or commu- 
nity experiences related to aspects of physical education. 
Prerequisites: sophomore standing and consent of adviser, 
instructor and dean. 

SPED 399. Independent Study (1-3) Topics assigned 
and approved by adviser, instructor and dean. 

SPED 405. Teaching Elementary Physical Education 

(4) Orientation to teaching physical education in grades 
PreK-5. Emphasis is on teaching styles, methods and 
curriculum. Apracticum in the public schools is required. 
Prerequisites: SPED 3 1 2 and Physical Education majors 
only, or consent of instructor. 

SPED 415. Individual Sports (3) Methods and materials 
for planning, teaching, and assessing the following indi- 
vidual sports: golf, bowling, and pickle ball. Prerequi- 
sites: SPED 200 or SREC 200, and SPED 320. Physical 
Education majors only or consent of instructor. 

SPED 420. Team Sports II (3) Methods and materials 
for planning, teaching, and assessing the following team 
sports: soccer, softball, and floor hockey. Prerequisites: 
SPED 200 or SREC 200, SPED 320, and Physical Educa- 
tion majors only, or consent of instructor. 

SPED 445. Measurement and Evaluation of Physical 
Education (3) History, basic statistical techniques utilized 
in scoring and interpreting tests, evaluation of measures 
now available in the field, and the administration of a 
testing program. Prerequisites: SMTH 201 or SPSY225 
or SSOC 220, fifteen hours in physical education theory 
courses and six hours of technique courses. 

SPED 450. Clinical Experience (1) A supervised clini- 
cal experience in a selected physical education setting 
designed to address any deficit in the required 100 hours 
of pre-student teaching practicum experience. Prerequi- 
sites: SEDF 210, SPED 304, SPED 312, SPED 405, and 
the permission of the instructor. 

SPED 453. Organization and Administration of Physi- 
cal Education (3) Organization and management of in- 
structional, intramural, interscholastic, and recreational 
programs, with emphasis on criteria for the selection 
and evaluation of activities. Prerequisites: fifteen hours 
in physical education theory courses and six hours of 
technique courses. 

SPED 455. Physical Fitness: Assessment and Pre- 
scription (3) Principles of exercise testing and prescrip- 



tion as they apply to fitness and performance, including 
the role of the health related components of fitness in 
performance, and/or physical fitness of normal and 
special populations, and the significance of cardiovas- 
cular programs through the life cycle. Prerequisites: 
SBIO 232; and SPED 200 or SREC 200. Prerequisite 
or corequisite: SPED 301. 

SPED 460. Issues and Trends in Physical Education 

(3) The philosophical, historical, and legal foundations 
of physical education as manifested in current issues 
and trends. Prerequisite: Admission to Directed Student 
Teaching. Corequisite: SPED 479. 

SPED 462. Physical Education for the Exceptional 
Child (3) Programs of developmental activity and guid- 
ance for students with restrictive disabilities. Included 
are techniques for appraising students with faulty body 
mechanics, orthopedic defects, and other atypical physi- 
cal conditions along with methods of handling, within the 
regular physical education class, the various handicaps 
commonly found in the schools. Prerequisite: SBIO 232. 
Prerequisite or corequisite: SPED 301. 

SPED 479. Directed Teaching in Physical Education 

(12) A supervised clinical experience nonnally consisting 
of seven weeks in an elementary school and seven weeks 
in a secondary school. The experience includes exploration 
of ethical issues, research through analysis and evalua- 
tion of teaching, and oral presentation of research results. 
Prerequisite: Approved application for directed teaching. 
Corequisite: SPED 460. Pass/fail credit. 



Physics (SPHS) 

SPHS 101. Introduction to Physical Science(3) Introduc- 
tion to the concepts, ideas, and methods of physical science 
with emphasis on the principles of classical and modem 
physics and chemistry. Prerequisite: SMTH 120 or higher, 
except statistics or higher placement in SMTH. 

SPHS lOlL. Introduction to Physical Science Labo- 
ratory (1) Experiments, exercises, and demonstrations 
to accompany SPHS 101. Prerequisite or corequisite: 
SPHS 101. 

SPHS 201, 202. General Physics I & II (4,4) Mechan- 
ics, heat, sound, wave motion, electromagnetism, optics, 
and modem physics. Three class, one recitation, and two 
laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite for 201: SMTH 
127 or consent of instmctor. No previous background 
in physics is assumed. Prerequisite for 202: SPHS 201. 
SPHS 201. 

SPHS 211, 212. Essentials of Physics I & II (4,4) Me- 
chanics, heat, wave motion, electromagnetism, optics, 
and modem physics taught from a calculus level. Three 
class, one recitation, and two laboratory hours per week. 
Prerequisite or corequisite for21 1 : SMTH 144. Prerequisite 
for 212: Physics 211. SPHS 211. 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



207 



Political Science 

See Government and International Studies 

Psychology (SPSY) 

Note: Psychology 101 is a prerequisite for all other 
psychology courses unless otherwise specified. 

SPSY 101. Introduction to Psychology (3) Survey of 
major topics in psychology (learning, perception, motiva- 
tion, intelligence, etc.), and an introduction to methods 
used in psychological investigation. 

SPSY 225. Psychological Statistics (3) Statistical prin- 
ciples, including measures of central tendency, variability, 
relative standing, probability, techniques of regression 
and correlation, statistical hypothesis testing, analysis of 
variance and nonparametric statistics with applications in 
the social sciences. Prerequisites: SPSY 101, SMTH 1 2 1 
or higher, or consent of instructor 

SPSY 300. Topics in Psychology (3) Survey of a selected 
topic planned around an area of faculty interest. Prereq- 
uisite: SPSY 101 or consent of instructor 

SPSY 302. Developmental Psychology (3) Introduction to 
life span developmental psychology providing an overview 
of cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development 
from conception to senescence. Prerequisite: SPSY 101 
or consent of instructor. 

SPSY 303. Psychology of Learning and Memory (3) 

Introduction to basic principles and theories of learning 
and memory including such topics as habituation, classi- 
cal and instrumental conditioning, verbal learning, social 
learning theory, behavior modification, and modeling. 
Prerequisite: SPSY 101 or consent of instructor 

SPSY 304. Cognitive Psychology (3) Higher mental 
processes including such topics as pattern recognition, 
attention, memory, language perception and production, 
decision making, problem solving, concept fonnation and 
cognitive growth. Behavioral and neuropsychological 
perspectives are considered. Prerequisites: SPSY 101 or 
consent of instructor 

SPSY 305. Sensation and Perception (3) The basic 
principles involved in vision, audition, taste, smell and 
skin senses. Topics include the structure and function 
of the various sensory systems and related brain areas, 
measurement of sensory experiences, and perceptual in- 
formation processing such as perception of color, pattern, 
movement, depth, music, and speech. Prerequisite: SPSY 
101 or consent of instructor 

SPSY307. Social Psychology (3) The principles governing 
human interaction including factors such as group dynam- 
ics, leadership, prejudice and propaganda. Prerequisite: 
SPSY 101 or consent of instructor 

SPSY308. Physiological Psychology (3) Basic neural and 
endocrine processes and their correlation with behavior 
Prerequisite: SPSY 101 or consent of instructor 



SPSY 309. Psychology of Personality (3) The major 
theories of personality and the factors involved in the 
development of personality. Prerequisite: SPSY lOI or 
consent of instructor 

SPSY 310. Abnormal Psychology (3) The nature of 
mental and emotional disorders including such topics 
as theories of emotional disorders and the causes and 
treatment of various disorders. Prerequisite: SPSY 101 
or consent of instructor 

SPSY 311. Industrial and Organizational Psychology 

(3) Survey of the theoretical and empirical foundations of 
human behavior in industries and organizations. Special 
consideration is given to applied problems as they relate to 
improving relationships between individuals and organiza- 
tions. Prerequisite: SPSY 101 or consent of instructor 

SPSY 325. Research Methods for Psychology (4) In- 
troduction to research methods for the study of behavior. 
Lectures, class discussion, and laboratory exercises drawn 
from diverse areas of psychology are used to provide prac- 
tical knowledge and skill in data analysis, experimental 
design, and writing technical reports. Prerequisite: SPSY 
101 and SPSY 225, or consent of instructor 

SPSY 330. Applied Psychology (3) Introduction to the 
practical applications of psychology in such areas as mental 
health, industry, schools, law enforcement, and advertising. 
Prerequisite: SPSY 101 or consent of instructor 

SPSY350. Psychology ofAdjustment (3) The process by 

which people adjust to the demands made upon them as a 
result of living with others. Basic processes of motivation 
and learning are examined, especially as these relate to the 
acquisition of the mechanisms of adjustment. Prerequisite: 
SPSY 101 or consent of instructor 

SPSY351. Psychology of the Exceptional Individual (3) 

Causes and characteristics of sensory, cognitive, and motor 
skillsand the behaviorand potential of exceptional individu- 
als. Prerequisite: SPSY 101 orconsent of instructor. 

SPSY 399. Independent Study (1-6) An individualized 
program of study planned in conjunction with a psychol- 
ogy faculty member Prerequisite: SPSY 101. 

SPSY 400. Advanced Topics in Psychology (3) Intensive 
study of a selected topic planned around an area of faculty 
or student interest. Prerequisite: SPSY 101 and one 300- 
level psychology class, or consent of instructor 

SPSY402. Experimental Topics in Psychology (4-8) The 

formation of testable hypotheses, research strategies, data 
collection and analysis, critical evaluation and scientific 
documentation as applied to a particular content area in 
psychology (for example, development, learning and 
memory, social, physiological, personality, industrial and 
organizational). Laboratory experiences are an integral 
part of this course. Prerequisites: SPSY 101, SPSY 225, 
SPSY 325, and corresponding SPSY 300-level topic area 
course, or consent of instructor 



20B 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



SPSY41 2. Theories of Counseling and Psycliotherapy (3) 

The different approaches to counsehng and psychotherapy 
with emphasis on both theory and technique. Prerequisites: 
SPSY 101 and SPSY 309. or consent of instructor. 

SPS Y 4 1 7. Psyciiological Tests (3) Theory, development, 
and application of intelligence, achievement, aptitude, and 
personality assessment measures. Prerequisite: SPSY 101, 
SPSY 225, or consent of instructor. 

SPSY 420. Psycliology of Men (3) Investigation of the 
male role in society today, with an overview of the histori- 
cal forces which have influenced the biological, cultural, 
social, cognitive, emotional, and sexual aspects of the male 
role. Prerequisite: SPSY 101, SPSY 300 level course, or 
consent of the instructor. 

SPSY 421. History and Systems of Psycliology (3) 

Historical roots of modem psychological theories and a 
survey of various present-day approaches. Prerequisite: 
SPSY 101,two300-level psychology courses, and junior 
standing; or consent of instructor. 

SPSY 442. Psyciiology of Women (3) Women's experi- 
ences, present day status and life-styles, and the biological 
and cultural antecedents of women's roles. Prerequisite: 
SPSY 101 or consent of instructor. 

SPSY 460. Human Sexual Behavior (3) Psychological, 
physiological, and sociological factors in human sexual 
behavior and attitudes. Prerequisites: SPSY 101, junior 
or senior standing, or consent of instructor. 

SPSY499. Psychology Internship (1-6) Supervised work 
experience in community agency or hospital. Fifty hours 
of work for each credit hour are required. Prerequisites: 
Psychology major, SPSY 325 with a minimum grade of 
C, senior standing and consent of instructor. 

SPSY 502. Senior Seminar: Special Topics in Psychology 

(3-6) Selected topics in psychology planned around areas of 
faculty interest and competence. Prerequisites: SPSY 101, 
SPSY 225, SPSY 325, or consent of instructor In order to 
enroll in senior seminar, a student must have completed all 
of the prerequisite courses with a minimum grade of C. 



zation, administration, supervision, planning, budgeting, and 
evaluation of recreational operations within most types of 
recreational agencies. Prerequisites: SREC 200 and 201. 

SREC 401. Lifetime Leisure (3) Practical application of 
principles in the provision of leisure and recreation services 
throughout an entire life focusing on individual needs, the 
process of program planning for different age groups, resource 
development, and application strategies. Models are taken from 
successful programs in international, national, state, local and 
institutional settings. Prerequisites: SREC 200 and 201. 

SREC 462. Recreation for Selected Populations (3) Practi- 
cal application of principles in the provision of recreation 
services to populations limited in access to normal recreation 
programs. Focus is on individual populations and the respec- 
tive barriers to participation, the process of program planning 
and resource development, and the practical experience of 
plan application. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

SREC 480A. Internship: Aquatics (6) Guided practical 
experience in an elected, organized recreational setting 
giving on-site experience in planning, executing, and 
evaluating recreational programs within an aquatic setting. 
Prerequisite: junior standing. 

SREC 480B. Internship: Community/Organizations (6) 

Guided practical experience in an elected, organized recre- 
ational setting giving on-site experience in planning, execut- 
ing, and evaluating recreational programs within community 
and organizational settings. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

SREC 480C. Internship : Industrial (6) Guided practical 
experience in an elected, organized recreational setting 
giving on-site experience in planning, executing, and 
evaluating recreational programs within an industrial 
setting. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

SREC 485. Senior Seminar ( 1 ) The integration of knowl- 
edge of recreation and individual professional activity at an 
advanced level utilizing research, oral presentation, a series 
of discussions, conferences, and role-playing experiences 
related to the various aspects of organized recreation as 
a career. Internships, employment opportunities, ethical 
issues, and other related topics are reviewed. 



Recreation (SREC) 

SREC 200. Introduction to Recreation (3) Evolution of lei- 
sure and recreation, overview of professional preparation, 
assistance in the development of personal uses of leisure, 
and a survey of the recreation professions in commercial, 
government, and voluntary organizations. 

SREC 201. Programming in Recreation (3) Planning rec- 
reation and leisure activities through the use of human and 
material resources in public, private, and commercial recreation 
programs for all age levels. Activities include: sports, arts and 
crafts, cultural and performing arts, social fiinctions, outdoor 
activities, and hobbies. Prerequisite: SREC 200. 

SREC 301 . Administration of Recreation (3) The organi- 



Religion (SREL) 

SREL 103. Comparative Religion (3) Beliefs and principles 
of the major faiths of Asia, the Middle East, and Africa, viewed 
from historical, cultural, and theological perspectives. 

SREL300. Asian ReligiousTraditions (3) History, beliefs 

and practices of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Tao- 
ism, Shinto and "popular" religion in Asia through modem 
times. Emphasis on the roles of religion in the history and 
culture of South Asian and East Asian societies. Prerequi- 
site: Sophomore standing or consent of instmctor. 

SREL 301. Western Religious Traditions (3) History, 
beliefs, values and practices of Judaism, Christianity and 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



209 



Islam through modem times, with a comparative perspective 
on law, institutions, scripture, gender and religious thought. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. 

SREL 360. Modern Islam (3) Modem history, beliefs, 
values and practices of Muslim communities worldwide, 
with focus on contemporary Islamic approaches to law, 
institutions, politics, scripture, and gender. Prerequisite: 
Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. 

SREL 399. Topics in Religion (3) Specific themes, re- 
gions, or traditions in religion. May be repeated for credit 
when topics vary. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or 
consent of instructor. 



Sociology (SSOC) 

Note: Sociology 101 is prerequisite to all other 
sociology courses. Sociology 101, 301, 302 and 499 are 
core courses. 

SSOC 101. Introduction to Sociology (3) Introduction 
to the major theoretical and methodological perspectives 
used to explain, investigate and analyze social life. 

SSOC 201. Introduction to Statistics for the Social 
Sciences (3) Fundamental principles of descriptive and 
inferential statistics as used in the social sciences, including 
measures of central tendency and variation, the normal 
approximation, probability, chance variability, estimation, 
hypothesis testing, and correlation. 

SSOC 301 . Sociological Theory (3) Roots and historical 
development of various sociological lenses as tools for 
examining the social world. 

SSOC 302. Sociological Research Methods (3) Quantita- 
tive, qualitative and comparative methods used in social 
science research, focusing on research design, data col- 
lection and analysis, and ethical issues. Prerequisite or 
corequisite: SSOC 301 or consent of instructor. 

SSOC 310. Individual and Society (3) Selected theoreti- 
cal orientations, methodological procedures, and research 
findings pertaining to the relations between the individual 
and society. 

SSOC 311. Social Problems (3) Content selected for 
contemporary importance and sociological relevance. 

SSOC 320. Sociology of Aging (3) Processes of aging as 
a form of socialization and demographic reality, includ- 
ing institutional effects. The status of the elderly and the 
sources of prejudice and discrimination they experience 
are emphasized. 

SSOC 321. Animals and Society (3) Sociological per- 
spectives on human-animal interaction and the role of 
animals in society. 

SSOC 323. Urban Sociology (3) Characteristics, causes, 
and impacts of city life. Different types of urban areas and 



current issues are examined from comparative, historical, 
and global perspectives. 

SSOC 325. Social Movements (3) Characteristics, causes, 
and impacts of social and political movements in the 
modem world. Different types of movements, including 
the American civil rights movement, are examined from 
comparative, historical, and global perspectives. 

SSOC 327. Population Dynamics (3) (=SGEG 340) Issues 
in measurement ofthe distribution and development ofhuman 
population . AppI ies the analytical methods used in accounting 
for the effects of births, deaths and migrations. 

SSOC 328. Social Demography (3) Selected theoretical 
orientations, methodological procedures and historical 
perspectives related to the social analysis and context of 
demographic change. 

SSOC 329. Social Change (3) Applies sociological lenses to 
current major social, cultural, economic, political, and global 
transformations, emphasizing their interrelationships. 

SSOC 330. Social Inequality (3) Theoretical perspectives 
and research on the unequal distribution of wealth power, 
and prestige in social life on a global, national, and local 
scale. Attention is given to the impact of globalization 
on social stratification. 

SSOC 333. Race and Ethnic Relations (3) Examines the 
basic concepts of race and ethnicity, relevant sociological 
theories, and their application to critical issues. 

SSOC 335. Sociology of Women (3) Theoretical and 
methodological approaches to the study of women in societ- 
ies. The importance of gender in defining women's roles 
is emphasized, along with the role of social institutions in 
contributing to the subordination of women as a group. 

SSOC 337. Gender and Society (3). A sociological inves- 
tigation of gender as a fundamental principle of social life. 
The interdependence of gender constructions and of societies' 
inequality structures across social institutions is explored. 

SSOC 339. Women and Armed Conflict (3) Women's 
lives in the context of armed conflict examined from 
comparative, historical and global perspectives. 

SSOC 341. Sociology of Families (3) Methods and 
theories used in the examination of intimate human re- 
lationships, including parenting, violence and abuse, and 
divorce and remarriage. Emphasizes the social factors 
that bring about change in family-related behaviors and 
create diversity in family forms. 

SSOC 343. Political Sociology (3) The societal conditions 
affecting political ideas, institutions, and practices. The 
role of politics in society is examined from comparative, 
historical, and global perspectives. 

SSOC 345. Sociology of Religion (3) The societal condi- 
tions affecting religious beliefs, institutions, and practices. 



210 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



The role of religion in society is examined from compara- 
tive, historical, and global perspectives. 

SSOC 347. Sociology of Organizations and Work (3) 

Sociological investigation of how post-industrial society 
and globalization impact the workplace, jobs, workers, 
gender, families and communities. The role of leadership 
in organizations is also examined. 

SSOC 351. Social Deviance (3) (=SCRJ 423) Theories, 
methods and substantive issues in the creation, involve- 
ment, recognition and control of deviance. Sociological 
theories and pertinent research data are integrated in the 
context of contemporary societal issues. 

SSOC 353. Sociology of Crime (3) Social factors in the 
development, identification, and treatment of crime and 
criminals. 

SSOC 355. Juvenile Delinquency (3) (=SCRJ 351 ) Social 
factors in the development, identification and treatment 
of delinquents and juvenile delinquency in the context of 
juvenile justice systems. 

SSOC 357. Sociology of Mental Health and Mental 
Illness (3) Social factors in the development, identifica- 
tion, and treatment of mental illness. 

SSOC 391. Special Topics (3) Emerging issues in con- 
temporary sociology. Selected topics organized around 
faculty and student areas of special interest. This course 
can be taken more than once if the topic is different. 

SSOC 395. Internship (3) Supervised work experience 
in a community agency based on an individualized, con- 
tracted program planned in conjunction with the relevant 
sociology faculty member. Ten hours per week in the field 
placement, at least three class meetings, and a formal, 
written sociological analysis of the field experience are 
required. The course may be taken more than once, but 
may be applied toward major credit in sociology only once. 
Nomially otTered every spring semester. 

SSOC 399. Independent Study (1-6) An individualized, 

contracted program of study planned in conjunction with 
a sociology faculty member. 

SSOC 499. Senior Seminar (3) A capstone course de- 
signed around topics selected by faculty. Emphasis is on 
research with written and oral presentations. Prerequisites: 
SSOC 301, 302, and 12 additional hours of upper level 
sociology with a C or better and statistics. 



Spanish (SSPN) 

Note: Unless othei-\\ise indicated, readings, lectures 
and discussion in foreign language courses above the el- 
ementary level are principally in the language concerned. 
Incoming students with previous experience in a foreign 
language must take a placement test. 

SSPN 101. Introductory Spanish I (3) Fundamentals 



of the language and culture through speaking, listening, 
reading, and writing. Admission to SSPN 101 is intended 
for those who have never studied Spanish previously. 

SSPN 102. Introductory Spanish II (3) Fundamentals of 
the language and culture through speaking, listening, reading, 
and writing. Prerequisite for SSPN 102 is SSPN 101. 

SSPN 201. Intermediate Spanish (3) Review of the basic prin- 
ciples of the language, with emphasis on reading, writing, and oral 
.skills. Prerequisite: SSPN 1 02 or placement through testing. 

SSPN 202. Intermediate Spanish (3) Review of the basic 
principles of the language, with emphasis on writing, oral 
skills, and the reading of literary and other authentic texts. 
Prerequisite: SSPN 201 or placement through testing. 

SSPN 250. Selected Spanish Studies Abroad (3-6) 

Development of intermediate level communication skills 
togetherwith immersion in the culture ofa foreign country. 
Prerequisite: SSPN 102 or consent of instructor. 

SSPN 301. Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3) 

Reading Hispanic literary texts/literary criticism. Focus 
is on literary tenns and their applications in close readings 
of Spanish and Spanish-American texts. Prerequisite: 
SSPN 202, or consent of instructor. 

SSPN 304. Hispanic Culture (3) Readings and visuals on 
Hispanophone historical, economic, cultural and social de- 
velopments in Latin America and the United States, taught in 
English. Prerequisite: SEGL 1 02 or consent of instructor. 

SSPN 309. Spanish Grammar and Composition (3) Fun- 
damental elements ofthe language and exercises in composi- 
tion. Prerequisite: SSPN 202 or consent of instructor. 

SSPN 310. Spanish Conversation (3) Development of 
oral skills, vocabulary and phonetic fluency through pre- 
sentations, discussions and group activities. Prerequisite: 
SSPN 202 or consent of instructor. 

SSPN 311. Introduction to Non-Literary Translation 

(3) Theoretical grounding and practical problems of pro- 
fessional translation (Spanish/English; English/Spanish). 
Translation of short legal, medical and commercial texts 
in their linguistic and cultural context and an overview 
ofthe translator profession in the USA are studied. Pre- 
requisites: SEGL 252 and SSPN 202; or SSPN 309; or 
consent ofthe instructor. 

SSPN 312. Introduction to Interpreting (3) General 
understanding ofthe problems for facilitating oral com- 
munication between monolingual speakers of English and 
Spanish. Develops basic skills forprofessional interpreting 
in its cultural context with practical exercises through role 
playing and the use of audio and audio visual material. 
Prerequisites: SSPH 201 and SSPN 202; or SSPN 310; 
or consent of the instructor. 

SSPN 315. Spanish for the Professions (3) Practice in 
oral and written language pertinent to specific careers, 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



211 



such as health care, criminal justice or business. Course 
may be repeated once with change in professional topic. 
Prerequisite: SSPN 202 or consent of instructor. 

SSPN 320. Spanish Civilization (3)Cultureandcivilization 
of Spain. Prerequisite: SSPN 202 or consent of instructor. 

SSPN 321. Latin American Civilization (3) Cultural 
heritage of the Latin American people from the pre-Co- 
lumbian period to the present. Prerequisite: SSPN 202 
or consent of instructor. 

SSPN 330. Survey of Spanish Literature I (3) Repre- 
sentative authors and works from Medieval, Renaissance, 
and Golden Age Literature. Prerequisite: SSPN 301 or 
consent of instructor. 

SSPN 331. Survey of Spanish Literature II (3) Major 
movements, principal authors, and representative works 
in Spanish literature since 1700. Prerequisite: SSPN 301 
or consent of instructor. 



SSPN 431. Masterworks of Hispanic Literature (3) 

Selected masterpieces written in Spanish. Selections are 
samplings of great literature from the Spanish-speaking 
world. Prerequisite: SSPN 301 or consent of instructor. 

SSPN 451. Second Language Acquisition (3) An intro- 
duction to major learning theories with particular focus 
on those dealing with acquisition of a second or foreign 
language. Field experience is required. Prerequisite: 
SSPN 202. 

SSPN 453. Introduction to Romance Linguistics (3) 

Descriptive and historical analyses of the Romance lan- 
guages, beginning with their origins in Latin. Prerequisite: 
SSPN 309 or SFRN 309 or consent of instructor. 

SSPN 454. Spanish Linguistics (3) Basic concepts and 
terminology essential to the study of Spanish phonology 
and phonetics, morphology, syntax, lexicon, semantics, 
language change and language variation. Prerequisite: 
SSPN 309 or consent of instructor. 



SSPN 332. Survey of Spanish American Literature I 

(3) Representative authors and works from pre-Columbian 
times through the colonial era. Prerequisite: SSPN 301 
or consent of instructor. 

SSPN 333. Survey of Spanish American Literature II 

(3) Major movements, principal authors, and representa- 
tive works from the nineteenth century to the present. 
Prerequisite: SSPN 301 or consent of instructor. 

SSPN 350. Selected Spanish Studies Abroad (3-6) 

Development of advanced level communication skills 
together with immersion in the culture of a foreign 
country. Prerequisite: SSPN 202 or 250 or consent of 
instructor. 

SSPN 398. Topics in Spanish Language or Literature (3) 

Intensive study in selected areas chosen by the instructor. 
Prerequisite: SSPN 301 or consent of instructor. 

SSPN 399. Independent Study or Internship (1-3) 

Supervised professional experience or research outside 
the classroom. For three internship credit hours, a student 
is to work 135 hours with an approved agency; for two 
credit hours, 90 hours; for one credit hour, 45 hours. For 
an internship or for an independent study, a contract must 
be signed by the student and by the instructor of record 
and other designated faculty and administrators. A student 
may repeat SSPN 399 once with a different internship or 
independent study contract description for a total of no 
more than six hours of undergraduate credit. Prerequi- 
sites: GPA 2.0 overall, 2.5 in foreign language courses, 
and consent of faculty supervisor. 

SSPN 420. U.S. Latino Literature (3) A core grouping 
of Latino authors who were either bom or raised in the 
United States and whose texts are written primarily in 
English. The selected texts are bilingual. Prerequisite: 
SSPN 309 or consent of instructor. 



SSPN 490. Senior Seminar in Spanish (3) Reading and 
research on selected topics designed to integrate knowledge, 
to explore ethical issues, and to gain experience in research 
and oral presentation. Prerequisite: three upper division 
Spanish literature courses. Corequisite: senior standing. 



Speech (SSPH) 

SSPH 201. Public Speaking (3) Oral communication and 
speaking before an audience. Prerequisite: SEGL 102 or 
consent of instnictor. 

SSPH 201H. Public Speaking Honors (3) An in-depth 
consideration of theories and principles of speech construc- 
tion, analysis and delivery. The writings of classical and 
contemporary philosophers, theorists and rhetoricians are 
considered. Intensive reading, writing, research, delivery 
and a service component are included. Prerequisites: SEGL 
1 02 ; admission to honors program as a second year student 
or permission of director of honors program. 

SSPH 301. Theories and Principles of Human Communi- 
cation (3) Theories, principles and functions of human com- 
munication. Topics includeculture, nonverbal communication, 
listening skills, self-disclosure, perception and interviewing. 
Prerequisites: SEGL 102 or consent of instructor. 

SSPH303. Ethics in Human Communication (3) An investi- 
gation of ethical principles relevant to interpersonal, small group 
and organizational communication. The relationship among 
philosophy, rhetoric, ethics and human communication is 
explored. Prerequisite: SSPH 301 or consent of instructor. 

SSPH 310. Interpersonal Communication (3) The study 
of the communication process as a form of practical ac- 
tion between individuals. The classroom functions as an 
interpersonal laboratory to study and practice interpersonal 
skills through discussions, exercises and projects. Pre- 
requisites: SSPH 201 or consent of instructor. 



212 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



SSPH 315. Conflict Resolution (3) Theories, research and 
functions of conflict resolution strategies in interpersonal, 
organizational, and community settings. Topics include 
conflict analysis, conflict management skills, dispute trans- 
formation and alternative dispute resolution. Prerequisite: 
Junior standing or consent of instructor. 

SSPH 333. Advanced Public Speaking (3) The principles 
and theories of speech composition. Areas of focus include 
rhetorical theory, strategic organization, evidence, reason- 
ing and delivery. Prerequisite: SSPH 201 or consent of 
instructor. 

SSPH 340. Voice and Diction (3) The analysis, evalua- 
tion, and improvement of speech based on the anatomy 
and physiology of the vocal mechanism, voice production, 
and articulation. 

SSPH 380. Intercultural Communication (3) An in- 
troduction to the theory and practice of difference-based 
communication. Students investigate the communicative 
impact of significant cultural differences in values, percep- 
tions and behavior. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

SSPH 398. Topics in Speech Communication (3) A specific 
area of speech is explored. Individual topics are announced. 

SSPH 415. Mediation (3) Concepts, skills and functions of 
mediation in interpersonal, organizational, and community 
settings. Topics include mediator styles and standards, 
principles of cooperation and problem-solving, and strate- 
gies for dispute transformation. SSPH 415L is available 
for additional credit. Prerequisite: SSPH 315. 

SSPH 415L. Mediation Laboratory ( 1) Demonstrations, 
exercises and applications of procedures used to develop 
mediation skills. Two laboratory hours per week. Prereq- 
uisite: SSPH 415 or consent of the instructor. 

SSPH 440. Argumentation and Debate (3) Fundamen- 
tal principles, skills and ethics of argument. In-class 
debates required. Prerequisites: SSPH 201 or consent 
of instructor. 

SSPH 441. Debate Laboratory (1 ) Participation in debate 
team activities, including research, construction of debate 
briefs, competition and travel. Weekly meetings are require. 
May be repeated for a total of four credits. Prerequisite: 
SSPH 440. Corequisite: Debate team membership. 

SSPH 448. Organizational Communication (3) Theories, 
research and functions of communication in organiza- 
tions, including communication practices and strategies 
in professional and social settings. Prerequisites: SSPH 
201 or permission of the instructor. 

SSPH 450. Communicating for Social Change (3) An 

introduction to theories and principles essential to under- 
standing the communicative function and processes of 
social movements. The construction and presentation of 
persuasive messages intended to produce social change 
are emphasized. Prerequisite: SSPH 201. 



Statistics (SSTA) 

SSTA410. Introduction to Probability Theory (3) Laws 
of probability and sample space; discrete and continuous 
distributions; joint, marginal and conditional densities; 
moment generating functions; univariate and bivariate 
normal distribution. Prerequisite: C or better in SMTH 
142 or consent of instructor. 

SSTA 413. Introduction to Stochastic Processes (3) 

Markov chains; Poisson processes; introductory renewal 
theory, Brownian motion and stationary processes used 
in mathematical modelling. Prerequisite: C or better in 
SSTA 4 1 or consent of instructor. 

Theatre (STHE) 

STHE 161. Introduction to Theatre Art (3) Understanding 
and criticism of dramatic literature, history, and production. 

STHE 170. Fundamentals in Acting (3) The technique 
of body and voice control, improvisation, interpretation of 
characters, and characterization applied in scenes. 

STHE 260. Theatre Laboratory (1) Participation in 
theatre production, including stage management, direction, 
costumes, makeup, lighting, sound, scenery, and business 
management. No formal class meetings. May be repeated 
for a total of four credits. 

STHE 301. Dramatic Theory and Criticism (3) A 

philosophical, psychological and social theorist perspec- 
tive. Analytical writing on topics such as social context 
and resonance of the drama, dramatic action, playwriting, 
dramatic illusion and Shakespeare is stressed. Prerequisite: 
SEGL 102 or consent of instructor. 

STHE 370. Voice for the Actor (3) Group study of the voice 
in performance, using applied breath and resonance techniques 
aimed at enhancing vocal power for the actor or public speaker. 
Exercises and te.xt work will be applied to voice techniques, 
creating a connection between the word image and vocal 
expression for the actor and public speaker Prerequisite 
SSPH 201: STHE 170 or consent of instructor. 

STHE 373. Fundamentals of Play Directing (3) Text 
analysis and interpretation. The emphasis is on discov- 
ering the intention of the playwright and on blocking, 
including picturization and composition, culminating 
in each student's production of a one-act play for public 
presentation. Prerequisite: STHE 170 

STHE 374. Intermediate Acting (3) Advanced scene 
and monologue performance including script analysis 
and character building. Plays of Classical Realists will 
be performed. Prerequisite: STHE 170. 

STHE 376. Stage Movement for the Actor (3) Centering, 

body alignment and kinetic power influencing the projec- 
tion of images and ideas. A studio warm-up and work-out 
developing the skills for the preparation of a variety of 
performance pieces demonstrating kinetic principles. 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



213 



culminating in a public perfomiance. 

STHE 377. Stagecraft (3) Drafting, design and inter- 
pretation of drawings for structural components of sets, 
lighting and costumes. Using the current production as 
a laboratory, students will concentrate on such skills as 
the basics of set construction, the computerized lighting 
system and costume construction. 

STHE 378. Playwriting (3) Script analysis and prepara- 
tion, dialogue development, character construction and 
scene composition. Students write full length manuscripts 
and participate in a public performance of readings from 
the completed plays. Prerequisite: English 102. 

STHE 379. Lighting Design (3) The design and drafting 
process of lighting for a stage production. Designing a light- 
ing plot and the role of lighting as a design element will be 
included; a research project will be assigned. Prerequisites: 
SEGL 102; STHE 161 or consent of instructor. 

STHE 380. Scene Design (3) Design and drafting processes 
necessary for theatrical scenic design. Text analysis, research 
and the design for various play genres will be included, as 
well as the use of computer assisted drafting. Prerequisites: 
SEGL 102; STHE 377 or consent of instructor. 

STHE 38L Stage Management (3) E.xperiences in 
technical organization and backstage supervision of a 
production. Topics will include backstage responsibili- 
ties, production cues, and director/manager and cast/crew 
relationships. Prerequisites: SEGL 102; STHE 170 or 
consent of instructor. 

STHE 382. Theatre for Youth (3) Creative drama 
methods for youth. A children's play will be produced 
and performed. Prerequisites: SEGL 102; STHE 1 70 or 
consent of instructor. 

STHE 383. Stage Combat (3) Basic techniques of unarmed 
and armed fighting for the theatre, stressing punches, kicks, 
tumbling, and falls, in the context of scene work and safety. 
Prerequisite: STHE 1 70 or consent of instructor. 

STHE 385. Theatre History I (3) History of theatrical 
production including major dramatic texts, dramatists, and 
dramatic theory. Included is a survey of stage and audi- 
torium architecture, stage machinery, scenery, costuming, 
lighting, acting and directing from pre-history through the 
Italian Renaissance. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

STHE 386. Theatre History H (3) History of theatrical 
production including major dramatic texts, dramatists, and 
dramatic theory. Included is a survey of stage and audi- 
torium architecture, stage machinery, scenery, costume, 
lighting, acting and directing, from the Italian Renaissance 
to the modem era. Prerequisite: SEGL 102. 

STHE 398. Topics in Theatre (3) 

STHE 399. Internship or Independent Study in The- 
atre (1 -3) Supervised professional experience of research 



outside the classroom. For three internship credit hours, 
a student is to work 135 hours with an approved agency; 
for two credit hours, 90 hours; for one credit, 45 hours. 
For an internship or an independent study, a contract 
must be signed by the student and by the instructor of 
record and other designated faculty and administrators. 
A student may repeat STHE 399 once with a ditTerent 
internship or independent study contract description for 
a total of no more than six hours of undergraduate credit. 
Prerequisites: GPA 2.0 overall, 2.5 in major, consent of 
faculty supervisor and junior standing. 

STHE 401. Classical Styles in Acting (3) Advanced 
study in the performance techniques and challenges par- 
ticular to classical theatre. Applied scene work, focusing 
on the physical, vocal, and textual requirements for the 
performance of Shakespeare, Moliere, and Greek classi- 
cal texts, will lead to the public performance of scenes 
and monologues. Prerequisite: STHE 170 or consent of 
instructor. 

STHE 402. Alternative Styles in Acting (3) Advanced 
modes of perfonnance and the physiological and vocal 
challenges particular to acting outside the realm of realism. 
Exercises will focus on physical approaches to building 
character through the context of scene work in Absurdist, 
Commedia, and othernon-realist tests. Prerequisite: STHE 
1 70 or consent of instructor. 

STHE 473. Advanced Play Directing (3) Choosing text, 
casting, directing a collaborative team and exercising 
complete artistic control over all aspects of theatre produc- 
tion. Principles of actor coaching and staging technique 
culminate in the public presentation of a one act play with 
at least an hour's running time or a select act from a fiill- 
length manuscript. Prerequisite: STHE 373. 

University (SUNV) 

SUNV 101. The Student in the University (3) The 

purposes of higher education and the potential role of an 
individual student within the university and other learning 
environments. Open to freshmen only. This course does 
not count toward graduation in some majors. 

SUNV 102. Freshman Orientation (1) The successful 
transition into higher education through social, personal 
and academic development. Considered are topics and 
activities in study skills, time management, goal setting, 
careers, health and wellness, responsibility, cultural aware- 
ness, and the enhancement of the relationship between the 
faculty adviser and the student. 

SUNV 103. Freshman Orientation (1) The successftil 
transition into higher education through academic, social, and 
personal development. Considered are topics and activities 
in time management, goal setting, responsibility, and careers, 
with special emphasis on study skills. The academic perfor- 
mance of students, in all classes, is monitored throughout 
the semester Required ofacademic skills students. (Students 
cannot receive credit for both University 103 and 102.) 



214 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



SUNV 201 . Leadership Development I (2) Various approaches 
to the definition of leadership and practical experience in bui Id- 
ing leadership skills. The critical questions of what is leadership, 
what are the qualities of a good leader, and what skills does a 
leader need are examined. Pass/fail credit. 

SUNV 202. Introduction to Leadership II (2) Practical 
experience in building leadership skills within the context 
of community-based leadership. The focus is upon the most 
pressing needs for leadership within the community to al- 
low students to become directly involved with a relevant 
project. Prerequisite: University 201. 

SUNV 301. Critical Analysis and Writing (3) (=SLGC 
205) The identification and evaluation of reasoning as it 
occurs in natural language uses. The techniques of careful 
reading and clear writing are demonstrated through the 
production of critical essays. Two lecture and one laboratory 
hour per week. Prerequisite: English 102 or equivalent. 

SUNV 310. Leadership Development Internship (1-4) 

Practical application of leadership principles through a public 
service internship. Limited to participants in the Leadership 
Development Program. Prerequisite: SUNV 202. 

SUNV 390. Peer Leadership Practicum (1-3) Applica- 
tion of specific guidance and teaching techniques while 
serving as a peer leader for University 101. Emphasis is 
placed on role modeling, group dynamics, creating class- 
room cohesion, using interactive teaching methods, and 
the importance of assessment. Acceptance into the peer 
leader program is required. Prerequisite: SUNV 101 or 
consent of instructor. May be repeated for additional credit 
for maximum of six hours. 

SUNV 398. Interdisciplinary Studies Internship (1-3) 

Supervised work experience in a community agency or 
business based on an individualized, contracted program 
planned in conjunction with a faculty member and approved 
by t he student's advisor. For three internship credit hours, 
a student is to work 1 3 5 hours with an approved agency; for 
two credit hours, 90 work hours; for one credit, 45 hours. 
A student may repeat SUNV 398 once with a different 
internship contract description for a total of no more than 
six hours of undergraduate credit. Prerequisites: junior 
standing, and approved internship contract. This intern- 
ship cannot be used to meet concentration requirements for 
bidisciplinary and multidisciplinary concentrations. 

SUNV 399. Independent Study (1-6) An individualized, 
contractual program of study planned in conjunction with a 
faculty member involved with the student's interdisciplinary 
program of study. May be repeated for a total of no more 
than six hours of undergraduate credit with consent of advisor 
Prerequisites: junior standing or permission of instructor. 

SUNV 490. Senior Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies 

(3) Reading and research on selected topics designed to 
explore issues ofbroad interdisciplinary interest. Designed 
to integrate knowledge at an advanced level, explore ethical 
issues, and gain experience in research and oral presenta- 



tion. Seminar topics vary. Prerequisites: senior standing 
and pennission of IDS advisor. This course cannot be 
used to meet senior seminar requirements in bidisciplinary 
concentrations. 

Women's Studies (SWST) 

SWST 101. Introduction to Women's Studies (3) In- 
terdisciplinary theories, methods and issues comprising 
Women's Studies. 

SWST 301. Feminist Theory and Methods (3) Philo- 
sophical exploration of feminist theories and feminist 
methods of inquiry. Prerequisite: SPHL 102 or SSOC 
101 or SWST 101 or pennission of instructor. 

SWST 355. U.S. Women's Movement (3) In-depth, 
interdisciplinary perspectives on U.S. women's activism, 
actions and resistance strategies. Prerequisite: SWST 101 
or SWST 301 or SGIS 350 or permission of instructor. 

SWST 398. Special Topics in Women's Studies (3) Survey 
of a selected topic planned around a faculty or student area 
of interest. Prerequisite: SWST 101 or an upper division 
course primarily addressing women's issues. 

SWST 490. Senior Seminar (3) Exploration, at an ad- 
vanced level, of issues, topics, and dilemmas related to 
Women's Studies. Topics covered will vary depending upon 
the instructor. Prerequisites: senior standing, SWST 301 
and other courses primarily addressing women's issues; 
permission of the instructor. 

Women's Studies Courses 

The following courses have been approved as Women's 
Studies courses. Detailed descriptions are available 
under departmental listings. 

S ATH 30 1 Women and Art 

SCRJ 376 Women and Crime 

SEGL 437 Women Writers 

SGIS 350 Women and American Politics 

SGIS 420 Women and Politics: A Global Perspective 

SHST 35 1 Women in Early Modem Europe and America 

SHST 352 Women in Modem Europe and America 

SHST 495 Topics in Women's History 

SPSY442 Psychology of Women 

SSOC 335 Sociology of Women 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



215 



Transfer Course Equivalencies 

The following courses are used for receiving appropri- 
ate level transfer credit to USC Upstate. 

SEGL 2 1 8 Introduction to Drama: An introductory 
course in reading and reviewing plays 

SEGL 225 Introduction to Poetry: An introductory 
course in the analysis of poetry 

SEGL 230 Images of Women in Literature: 

An introductory course of archetypes and 
stereotypes of women in literature 

SLGC 105 Basic Introduction to Logic: 

Introduction to the structure of argument, 
including symbolization, proof, fonnal 
fallacies, deduction and induction 

SPHL 131 Introduction to Ethics: Critical examina- 
tion of normative theories of obligation 
and value using a variety of moral 
problems as units of analysis 

SCRJ 215 Issues and Ideas: State and Local Politics 
Introductory examination of systems and 
issues relating to city, county, and state 
government 

SSOC 102 Social Aspects of Marriage and Family: 
Introduction to the functions, processes, 
and problems of families 

SSOC 205 Introduction to Contemporary Social 
Issues: Introduction to selected current 
social issues and problems 

SSOC 206 Introduction to Social Psychology: 
Fundamental question about human 
behavior emphasizing the relationship 
between the individual and the group 

SCRJ 2 1 Introduction to Juvenile Delinquency: 
Introduction to fundamental questions 
regarding the development of deviant 
behavior as it applies to adolescents and 
their treatment within the criminal justice 
system (same as SSOC 210) 

SSOC 235 Introduction to Death and Dying: 

Introduction to the social aspects of death 
and dying, including rites and rituals of 
different societies 

SPHL 1 2 1 Moral Problems in the Modem World: 
Discussion of contemporary moral 
problems and related theoretical issues, 
focusing on such issues as sexual morality, 
punishment, abortion, racism, sexism, 
warfare and civil disobedience 



216 



Course Descriptions 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 




Graduate Studies 



The University of South Carolina Upstate offers the 
degree of Master of Education in Early Childhood Edu- 
cation, Elementary Education and in Special Education: 
Visual Impairment. 

use Upstate School of Education 

Graduate Mission Statement 

"Preparing Reflective Professionals " 

Educators prepared in the graduate school at USC 
Upstate are well-versed in the liberal arts and applicable 
content areas, the latest developments in curriculum and 
instruction, theory and practice, and the research-based, 
sociocultural, and philosophical foundations of education. 
They understand and respect cultural diversity, welcome 
diversity of opinion and belief, and place the welfare of 
their students first. As reflective professionals, they are 
leaders among their colleagues and are committed to a 
service ideal built upon the highest standards and ethical 
principles. 

Admission 

Application packets may be obtained from the USC 
Upstate Admissions Office or from the USC Upstate 
School of Education. Appl ication for admission to graduate 
programs will be given consideration after receipt of all 
credentials. Admission to the M.Ed, in Early Childhood 
Education, the M.Ed, in Elementary Education and the 
M.Ed, in Special Education: Visual Impairment is based 
on the total profile of the applicant. 



Degree Candidates 

Individuals seeking admission to USC Upstate as a 
degree candidate will be considered for fijll admission 
when the USC Upstate Admissions Office receives aU 
admissions materials. However, students are eligible 
to take up to twelve hours of program courses pending 
receipt of all materials. If the student meets all criteria, 
the student will be accepted as a degree candidate. 

• Temporary, professional or initial teacher 
certificate 

• Application for degree seeking graduate 
students, (available at www.uscupstate.edu) 

• $40 application fee' ( Students who have previ- 
ously attended the University of South Carolina 
Upstate Graduate School in a degree program and 
have paid the application fee, are not required to 
do so again). 

• A state residency status form. 

• Two letters of recommendation using forms 
provided in the application packet. 

• Minimum Miller Analogy Test (MAT) score of 
390 or Graduate Records Examination (GRE) 
score of 400 on the verbal section and 400 on 
the quantitative section. 

• Official copies of transcripts from all previous 
undergraduate and graduate studies. 

• A minimum GPA on all undergraduate course 
work of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale. 



• Proof of immunization for measles (rubeola) and 
German measles (rubella) if bom after Dec. 31, 
1956. 

• Apersonalinterviewwithamemberofthe faculty 
of the USC Upstate School of Education. 
Attendance at a regularly scheduled Portfolio 
Introduction and Training Session. 

Conditional Admission 

Under two circumstances a student may apply for 
conditional admission as long as all other admission 
requirements have been ftilfilled. 

1 . If, after two attempts, the student fails to meet 
the required Miller Analogies Test (MAT) 
score of 390 or Graduate Records Examina- 
tion (GRE) score of 400 on the verbal section 
and 400 on the quantitative section 

OR 

2. The student does not have the minimum GPA 
on all undergraduate coursework of 2.5 on 

a 4.0 scale. 

The student must submit a request for conditional 
admission in writing to the director of graduate programs. 
If the student fails to meet BOTH of these criteria they 
ARE NOT eligible for conditional admission. 

If the student is granted conditional admission, and 
achieves a minimum GPA of 3.25 on the initial 12 hours 
of USC Upstate program coursework, the student will be 
fully admitted as a masters candidate. If the student fails 
to achieve this grade point average, the student may not 
continue in the masters program. 

Applicants Not Seeking a Degree 

Students wishing to enroll in either program courses 
or professional development courses but who do not wish 
to pursue a graduate degree at USC Upstate must submit 
the following admission materials: 

Initial teacher certificate or a letter indicating 
full-time employment by a school district (i.e. 
PACE program or interns). 

• Application for Non-Degree Seeking Graduate 
Students, (available at www.uscupstate.edu) 

• $10 application fee' 

• A state residency status form. 
Students with No Teaching Credential 

Students holding a baccalaureate degree but no teach- 
ing credential may be admitted and enroll in graduate 
courses as a non-degree student with the approval of the 
Director of Graduate Programs. However, only teachers 
who hold a permanent, current teaching credential are 
eligible for the reduced tuition rate allowed for certified 
teachers. 

Students admitted as non-degree students may take up 
to twelve hours of graduate work without being admitted 
to a degree program. In order to enroll in more than 12 
hours as a non-degree student, the applicant must complete 
another non-degree application forni, a state residency 
status form, and submit a copy of a teaching credential. 
This procedure will allow an additional 12 hours of 
graduate study. However, the applicant must be aware 
that a maximum of six hours of professional development 

Fees are subject to change as approved by USC Board of Trustees. 



218 



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2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



courses are applicable to a degree program. 

Change of academic objectives. Students are admit- 
ted to a specific graduate program at the time of acceptance. 
Upon completion of that degree, further graduate study 
requires readmission to graduate studies. 

Valid period of admission. Admission to graduate 
study at USC Upstate is valid for one year. If an applicant 
fails to complete any graduate course or part of the pre- 
scribed program within this period, the acceptance lapses, 
and the student becomes subject to any new requirements 
that may have been adopted. Students who do not enroll 
in classes within one calendar year of admission must 
reapply. 

Students who have been admitted to graduate study at 
the University of South Carolina under regulations other 
than those now in force, and who have not completed any 
USC courses during a period of three or more years, are 
required to fulfill current admission requirements prior 
to attending USC Upstate for additional graduate work. 
Upon readmission. these students become subject to the 
current graduate regulations. 

Disability Services 

Students with disabilities are assisted through the Of- 
fice of Disability Services. The staff works toward acces- 
sibility for all university programs, services, and activities 
in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act 
of 1 973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Services 
offered include priority registration, test proctoring, class- 
room adaptation, sign language interpreter, reader, braille, 
and note taker. If you have a disability and need assistance, 
contact the Office of Disability Services. 

Graduate Tuition 

Academic fees at the University of South Carolina 
Upstate are established by the University of South Carolina 
Board of Trustees and are subject to change. 

Tuition' 

All fees are payable in full at the beginning of each 
term. 

Graduate: 

Part-time and summer school students 

South Carolina residents ... $384 per semester hour 

Non-residents $8 1 6 per semester hour 

Certified Teachers $266 per semester hour 

Academic Regulations 

Students may obtain a degree following the require- 
ments in force at the time they are admitted to degree 
candidacy, or under subsequent regulations published 
while they are degree candidates. However, students are 
restricted in the choice of requirements to one specific 
catalog. Students have a period of six years inclusive 
and continuous in which to claim the rights of a specific 
catalog. Students may request permission to revalidate 
USCAJSC Upstate program courses falling outside the 
six-year parameter. With the approval of the director of 
graduate programs, the student will work under the direct 
supervision of a graduate faculty member to update course 



content and to demonstrate competency on an examina- 
tion. 

Students are advised that unforeseen circumstances 
may interfere with the scheduling of any given course 
or degree offering. Students are required to take such 
developments into account as they arise, even if doing so 
means a delay in the fulfillment of some of their academic 
goals or modification of those goals. 

Advisement 

Every candidate admitted for a degree is assigned 
a faculty advisor with whom to plan a program of study 
relevant to specific objectives and sufficiently intensive and 
sequential to assure professional competence and breadth 
of knowledge. Students have the privilege of requesting 
a particular advisor, subject to the consent of the faculty 
member and approval of the director of graduate prograrns. 
The advisor should be a specialist in the candidate's major 
area of study. 

Program of Study 

Immediately following admission to the program, 
every degree seeking student, working with an advisor, 
must develop and file a program of study in the office of 
graduate programs. A program of study is an agreement 
signed by the student, the advisor, the director of graduate 
programs and the dean of the School of Education. This 
formal agreement serves a number of purposes to the 
benefit of both the student and the University. It causes the 
student and the advisor to engage in early planning with 
a specific goal in mind; it provides useful infomiation for 
the planning of course offerings; it facilitates subsequent 
advisement, and it protects the student in the event of un- 
expected curriculum or faculty changes. Although formal 
programs are binding, they can be modified or replaced 
by new programs if conditions warrant such changes. 

Courses 

Prerequisites. Prerequisite courses are listed to inform 
students about the academic background recommended 
for satisfactory course completion. The instructor may 
approve the enrollment of students who have acquired 
the equivalent knowledge or skills through other courses 
or experiences. Special permission to enroll should be 
requested from the instructor prior to registration. 

Course loads. Nine semester hours in the fall and 
spring semesters and three hours during a summer session 
are considered full time enrollment. 

Correspondence courses. The University neither 
offers correspondence courses for graduate credit nor 
accepts correspondence work as applicable toward any 
graduate degree. 

Credit by examination. No graduate credit is offered 
by examination. 

Auditing. Students wishing to audit graduate courses 
are advised to obtain permission from the dean of the School 
of Education. Arrangements for auditing are duly recorded 
at the time of registration. No credit may be earned for an 
audited course, either by examination or otherwise, and no 
audited course may be repeated for credit at a later date. 

'fees are subject to change as approved by USC Board of Trustees. 



Graduate Studies 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



219 



No record of audit shall appear on a transcript unless a 
student attends 75 percent of the classes. 

Academic Residency Requirement 

Students must successfully complete a minimum 
of 24 semester hours of program courses offered by the 
University of South Carolina Upstate. 

Dropping a Course 

Courses dropped through the late registration period 
will not be recorded on the student's transcript. 

A course dropped following late registration through 
the sixth week of a regular semester is recorded with 
a non-penalty grade of W. After the sixth week of the 
semester, any courses dropped will appear on the perma- 
nent record with a grade of WF unless documentation is 
offered which is acceptable to the instructor and the dean 
of the School of Education. A WF is treated as an F in the 
evaluation of the student's eligibility to continue and in 
computing the student's grade point average. Students who 
stop attending class without officially withdrawing have 
the course recorded with a grade of F, which is included 
in all calculations and totals. 

The academic calendar for spring and fall graduate 
courses gives the prescribed dates for dropping a course. 
In summer sessions, other shortened terms, and specially 
scheduled courses, the period for withdrawal with a grade 
of W is 43 percent of the total number of class days. 
The student should consult with the Office of Graduate 
Programs concerning the withdrawal dates for specially 
scheduled courses. A course cannot be dropped after the 
last day of classes specified for the session in which the 
course is scheduled. 

If a student must either drop a course or withdraw 
from the University for medical reasons or other acceptable 
major cause after the penalty date (last day to receive a 
W), the student must submit the form entitled Request for 
Assignment of W Grade for Medical Reason or Extenu- 
ating Circumstances After Penalty Date. This form must 
be approved by the course instructor and the dean of the 
School of Education. 

Withdrawal From All Courses 

All students, both full- and part-time, wishing to 
withdraw from the University (discontinue enrollment 
from all courses) must complete an Application for 
Withdrawal form. Withdrawal applications are available 
from the Records Office and from the Office of Graduate 
Programs. Students must obtain the required signatures 
before the withdrawal will be processed by the Records 
Office. 

Grades assigned upon withdrawal are determined 
as described above for dropping courses. The date of 
withdrawal from the University will be posted on student 
transcripts. 

Any student withdrawing within the scheduled refiind 
period (as published in the Schedule of Classes) can expect 
to receive a refund through the mail in approximately six 
to eight weeks. If at the time of withdrawal, the student 
has any financial obligations to the University, these will 
be deducted from any refiand due. Reftinds for those 



students who received and used financial aid in payment 
of academic fees will be applied toward repayment of 
financial aid. 

Students who have received long-term loans through 
the University must contact the financial aid office for an 
exit interview. Failure to participate in an exit interview 
may result in a hold being placed on transcripts. 

Grades and Credit 

Credit values. The credit value of each course is 
usually equal to the number of hours the class meets each 
week for one term. 

Grading system. The letter grades A, B, C, D and F 
are employed to designate excellent, good, fair, poor and 
failing work respectively. B+, C+ and D+ also may be 
recorded. Courses graded D or lower cannot be applied 
to degree programs. The letter grades S (satisfactory) and 
U (unsatisfactory) are assigned only in courses that have 
been approved for pass-fail grading, or in a regular course 
where the student, with the approval of the dean of the 
School of Education, has elected an individual pass-fail 
option (see Pass/Fail Option). Courses completed with an 
S may be counted toward total credits earned. 

The grade of 1, incomplete, is assigned at the discre- 
tion of the professor when in the professor's judgment, a 
student is prevented from completion of some portion of 
the assigned work in a course because of an unanticipated 
work-related responsibility, family hardship, illness, ac- 
cident, or verified disability. The student should notify the 
professor without delay that one of these conditions exists 
or has arisen; notification must be given prior to the end 
of the term. The professor will determine, according to the 
nature of the interruption and the uncompleted require- 
ments, what additional period of time will be allowed for 
completing the work before a permanent grade is assigned. 
An Assignment of Incomplete Grade form must then be 
completed by the professor (with copy to student) and 
submitted to the Records Office specifying the justifica- 
tion for the I, conditions for make-up, and deadline for 
completion. Re-enrolling in a course will not make up 
an incomplete grade. A grade of 1 is not computed in the 
calculation of a student's grade point average. 

After 12 months an I, which has not been replaced 
with a letter grade is changed permanently to a grade of 
F unless the I was erroneously recorded. If the professor 
believes there is academic justification for an extension 
beyond the one year limit, a request for extension should 
be submitted to the dean of the School of Education before 
the expiration of the year, specifying the justification and 
specific duration of the extension on the form entitled 
Extension of Incomplete Time Period Authorization. 

NR, no record, is assigned by the Records Office if 
a grade has not been submitted at the proper time or if 
any grade not approved for a particular course has been 
submitted. It is a temporary mark on the transcript, and 
must be replaced by a grade. If replacement does not 
occur before the last week of the spring or fall semester 
following the term from which the grade was recorded, a 
grade of F will be assigned. 

Special make-up work, extra work, or examination 
to change a grade already recorded is not permitted. 



220 



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Academic standards. Graduate courses may be 
passed for degree credit with a grade as low as C, but the 
student's average on all courses attempted for graduate 
credit must be at least B (3.0 on a 4 point system). Ad- 
ditionally, the student's average on all courses numbered 
700 or above must be no less than 3.0. Grades earned on 
credits transferred from other universities do not count in 
the grade point average. 

An accumulation of grades below B on 12 credits of 
graduate course work taken at the University within a six 
yearperiod will disqualify a student fora graduate degree. 
This rule applies to courses taken in degree programs, 
non-degree programs, or in more than one degree program. 
These students are suspended from degree candidacy but 
may enroll in professional development courses with the 
approval of the director of graduate programs. After a grade 
below B is six years old, it will cease to be a disqualifying 
factor. 

Transfer Credit. Transfer work from a region- 
ally accredited institution applicable to a master's degree 
MUST BE WITHIN THE SIX YEARS PRIOR to USC 
Upstate degree completion. A maximum of twelve se- 
mester hours credit (nine if part of a master's degree at 
the other institution) may be considered, subject to these 
additional provisions: (a) the courses must be documented 
by an official transcript mailed to the admissions office 
by the awarding institution; (b) the transcript must clearly 
indicate that graduate credit was awarded or specifically 
verified by the institution's registrar or graduate dean; (c) 
the courses must be judged appropriate by the student's 
advisor, approved by the dean of the School of Education, 
and listed on an approved program of study; (d) courses 
graded lower than B are not transferable; (e) USC Upstate 
provides no revalidation mechanism for courses completed 
at another institution. 

Appeals for reinstatement. Appeals forreinstatement 
to degree candidacy should be reviewed by the dean of 
the School of Education and forwarded to the executive 
vice chancellor for academic affairs for review by the 
USC Upstate Graduate Committee. 

Appellants who have maintained a B average despite 
their accumulation of lower grades may, if their appeals 
are supported by the School of Education, be allowed to 
proceed toward their degrees provided they receive no 
additional grades below B. 

Appellants who have not maintained a B average 
should show extenuating circumstances and obtain the 
support of the School of Education if they wish to be 
considered for reinstatement by the USC Upstate graduate 
committee. 

Pass/Fail Option 

Under certain circumstances, a student may elect 
pass/fail grading in a course outside the major area. This 
option permits enrichment of the student's experience 
without affecting grade point average. A grade of either 
S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory) will be awarded. 
Courses completed with a satisfactory grade may be 
counted toward total credit hours earned. Any student 



interested in this option should consult with the direc- 
tor of graduate programs and the dean of the School of 
Education prior to registration. 

Transcripts 

ALL OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPTS MUST BE RE- 
QUESTED IN WRITING FROM THE USC COLUMBIA 
RECORDS OFFICE. 

No transcript will be issued to or for a student who 
is indebted to the University. 

With the exception of copies made for internal uni- 
versity use, no copy of a student's record will be released 
anywhere (including the state department of education) 
without the student's written consent. 

Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate 
Courses (Senior Privilege) 

A special provision to earn graduate credit is avail- 
able for USC Upstate undergraduate seniors in their final 
semester who have a minimum GPAof 3.0, and who need 
less than a normal course load to complete baccalaureate 
requirements. Overload enrollment, which includes one 
or more courses under senior privilege is not allowed. 
Courses for graduate credit under senior privilege cannot 
be used toward undergraduate degree requirements. 

Attendance 

Students are expected to attend all regular class meet- 
ings. Unsatisfactory class attendance may be considered 
adequate reason, by the instructor, for requesting the 
student to withdraw from a course. 

Auditors are expected to conform to the same atten- 
dance requirements as students registered for credit, but 
in any case, must attend at least 75 percent of scheduled 
class meetings. 

Change of Name 

A student wishing a name change must present to 
the Records Office proper legal documentation such as a 
marriage license, a court order approving a name change, 
or a divorce decree in which a name change is granted. 

Change of Address 

Students are obligated to notify the Records Office of 
any change of address. Failure to do so can cause serious 
delay in the handling of student records and notification of 
emergencies at home. Returned mail due to an incorrect 
address will result in a "hold" being placed on a student's 
record, preventing registration. 

Appeal Policy and Procedure 

The University of South Carolina Upstate is committed 
to judicious, fair and impartial resolution of all conflicts 
regarding student complaints. The following process is 
designed to provide an objective review of the student 
complaints regarding a variety of academic grievances 
arising out of admissions, readmissions, assessment of 
academic records, academic standing, a variety of academic 
policies and/or grading criteria. 



Graduate Studies 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



221 



General Guidelines 

1. All submissions to all levels of appeal must be 
submitted in writing and applicable forms must be 
typewritten or word-processed. 

2. All parties concerned must honor all deadlines and 
timelines. 

3. While the appeal process may result in the recom- 
mendation of a grade change — only faculty who 
initiated the grade in question shall implement 
grade changes. 

4. The student may appear before and make 
presentations to the committee during the appeal 
process. 

Steps 

1. Appeal to the faculty member or initial decision 
maker. 

2. Appeal to the division chair or director of Graduate 
Programs. Must take place within five days of Step 
1 decision. 

3. Appeal to the dean of appropriate school or college. 
Must take place within five days of Step 2 decision. 

4. Appeal to the USC Upstate Graduate Committee. 

Within five days of the dean's decision, the student 
must submit in writing to the chair of the graduate com- 
mittee his/her intent to appeal. Within 1 working days of 
receiving the appeal, the graduate committee shall gather 
all relevant material, hold its hearing and make a report 
to the vice chancellor for academic affairs. 

The decision of the USC Upstate graduate commit- 
tee is final. All decisions regarding grade changes at any 
step are in the form of recommendations only. Only the 
faculty member who initiated the grade in question can 
change grades. Appeals must be initiated before the last 
day of the following major semester in which the disputed 
decision was made. 

Applications for Degrees 

All candidates for a degree must complete the degree 
application process. Students may obtain an application 
for degree from the graduate office in the School of Edu- 
cation. Submission deadlines are listed in the semester 
course schedule. 

Financial Aid 

College work-study and Federal Family Education 
Loan Programs, which includes both subsidized and 
unsubsidized Stafford loans, are available to students 
fially admitted to graduate programs at USC Upstate. 
To qualify, students must be admitted to a USC Upstate 
graduate program of study and be enrolled for no less than 
six hours each semester. Descriptions of these financial 
aid programs can be found in the undergraduate section 
of this catalog. 

Eligibility for assistance for federal financial aid is 
determined by completing a Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA is used to calculate 
the amount a graduate student and family can contribute 
toward the cost of education from reported income and 
resources. The difference between the cost of education 
and the family contribution is the student's financial need. 



In addition to demonstrating financial need, individual 
federal aid programs have specific requirements. Program 
requirements are explained in detail in The Student Aid 
Guide published annually by the U.S. Department of 
Education and available in the USC Upstate Office of 
Financial Aid and Scholarships. 

Satisfactorv Academic Progress 

Graduate students are required to be making satisfac- 
tory progress for receipt of federal financial aid. Graduate 
students are considered to be making satisfactory progress 
if they: 

1 . are admitted and enrolled as advanced degree 
or certificate students. 

2. meet university standards for continued enroll 
ment in an advanced degree or certificate 
program. 

3. maintain a USC Upstate cumulative grade 
point average of 3.0 or higher each semester 
enrolled. 

4. complete at least eighty percent of the total 
number of hours attempted each academic 
year. 

Full-time graduate students will be allowed three 
academic years to complete the advanced degree. Students 
enrolled less than full-time will be given the equivalent 
of six fiill-time semesters to complete the advanced de- 
gree. 

Full-time enrollment is defined as nine hours each 
semester. Half-time enrollment is defined as six semester 
hours each semester. The hours attempted is defined as the 
number of hours attempted at the end of the 100% drop 
period. Incompletes will not be counted as hours passed 
until a final grade is determined. Repeat courses will be 
counted as hours attempted in determining satisfactory 
academic progress. 

Students not meeting USC Upstate's satisfactory aca- 
demic progress standards may appeal to the financial aid 
committee using the same procedures as undergraduates. 

Notification of Student Rights 
Under FERPA 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
(FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to 
their education records. They are: 

(1) The right to inspect and review the student s edu- 
cation records within 45 days of the day the University 
receives a request for access. 

Students should submit to the registrar, dean, head of 
the academic division, or other appropriate official, written 
requests that identi fy the record( s) they wish to inspect. The 
university official will make arrangements for access and 
notify the student of the time and place where the records 
may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the 
university official to whom the request was submitted, that 
official shall advise the student of the correct official to 
whom the request should be addressed. 

(2) The right to request the amendment of the student 's 
education records that the student believes are inaccurate 
or misleading. 

Students may ask the University to amend a record that 
they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write 



222 



Graduate Studies 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



the University official responsible for the record, clearly 
identifying the part of the record they want changed, and 
specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. 

If the University decides not to amend the record as 
requested by the student, the University will notify the 
student of the decision and advise the student of his or her 
right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. 
Additional information regarding the hearing procedures 
will be provided to the student when notified of the right 
to a hearing. 

(3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally 
identifiable information contained in the student 's educa- 
tion records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes 
disclosure without consent. 

The University of South Carolina will disclose infor- 
mation from a student's education records only with the 
written consent of the student, except: 

(a) To school officials with legitimate educational 
interests: 

•A school official is a person employed by 
the University in an administrative, supervi- 
sory, academic or research, or support staff 
position; a person or company with whom the 
University has contracted (such as an attorney, 
auditor, or collection agent); a person serv ing 
on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving 
on an official committee, such as a disciplinary 
or grievance committee, or assisting another 
school official in performing his or her tasks. 
•A school official has a legitimate 
educational interest if the official needs to 
review an education record in order to ful- 
fill his or her professional responsibility. 

(b) To officials of other institutions in which the 
student seeks or intends to enroll provided 
that the student has previously requested a 
release of his/her record; 

(c) To authorized representatives of the U.S. 
Department of Education, the Comptroller 
General of the United States, state educational 
authorities, organizations conducting studies 
for or on behalf of the University, and 
accrediting organizations; 

(d) In connection with a student's application 
for, and receipt of. financial aid; 

(e) To comply with a judicial order or lawfully 
issued subpoena; 

(f) To parents of dependent students as defined by 
the Internal Revenue Code. Section 1 52; 

(g) To appropriate parties in a health or safety 
emergency; or 

(h) To the alleged victim of any crime or violence 
of the results of any disciplinary proceedings 
conducted by the University. 

The University of South Carolina has designated the 
following items as directory information: a student's 
name, electronic mail address, local and permanent 
mailing addresses and telephone numbers, semesters of 
attendance, enrollment status (full- or part-time), date of 
admission, date of graduation, school, majors and areas 
of concentration, whether or not currently enrolled, clas- 



sification (freshman, etc.), type of degree being pursued, 
degrees, honors, and awards received (including scholar- 
ships and fellowships), weight and height of members of 
athletic teams, and whether the student has participated 
in officially recognized activities and sports sponsored by 
the University. 

The University may disclose any of these items without 
prior written consent, unless the student has submitted a 
written request to the Office of the Registrar not to release 
directory information pertaining to them. Requests will 
be processed within 24 hours after receipt. Directory in- 
formation will be withheld from student directories and 
telephone books only if notification is received prior to 
the publication of these documents. The electronic direc- 
tory is updated each weekend; requests for non-disclosure 
will be honored with the ne.xt update after the request is 
processed by the staff of the Office of the Registrar. 

(4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. De- 
partment of Education concerning alleged failures by the 
University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. 

The name and address of the office that administers 
FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. De- 
partment of Education, 600 Independence Avenue, SW, 
Washington DC 20202-4605. Questions concerning this 
law and the University's procedures concerning release 
of academic information may be directed to the Office of 
the Registrar at 864-503-5220. 

State Residency Requirements 

The University of South Carolina Upstate assesses 
tuition and fees upon the basis of state residency. The rules 
regarding the establishment of legal residency for tuition 
and fee purposes for institutions of higher education are 
governed by the South Carolina Code of Laws. A copy 
of this law in its entirety is available from the Office of 
Admissions. 

The initial resident status determination is made at the 
time of admission and prevails until such time that a student 
establishes a proper claim to residency as defined by the 
laws of South Carolina. Any student who is discovered 
to have been improperly classified as a South Carolina 
resident will be reclassified as a non-resident and will be 
required to pay differences in fees. 

Persons having questions about residency are encour- 
aged to secure a Residency Application Package from the 
Office of Admissions. Appointments with the director of 
admissions to discuss residency requirements are also 
encouraged. 



Graduate Studies 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



223 



Master of Education Degree in Early Childhood or Elementary Education 



Programs of study leading to the degree of Master of 
Education are offered in early childhood education and 
elementary education. Orientation, including a portfolio 
information training session, is provided prior to the begin- 
ning of each academic term. Information about graduate 
programs is available from the USC Upstate Office of 
Graduate Programs at 864-503-5573 andatwww.uscupstate. 
edu. 

USC Upstate Master of Education degrees are not de- 
signed for the purpose of initial teacher certification. Initial 
teacher certification is required for admission to the M.Ed, 
degree program. 

The Master of Education degree requires: 

1 . Successfijl completion of an approved program 
of study providing 36 hours of graduate credit, of 
which at least 50 percent must be earned in courses 
numbered 700 or above (the remainder may be in 
courses numbered 500-699). 

2. Successfiil defense of a Graduate Professional 
Portfolio. The Graduate Professional Portfolio is 
introduced during the initial orientation to graduate 
programs for degree candidates. During program 
courses and continuing professional experience, 
candidates accumulate artifacts for the portfolio. 
Candidates select for the portfolio, those artifacts 
which most clearly document their professional 
development, prepare a rationale for the inclu- 
sion of items in each section of the portfolio, and 
defend the portfolio before a panel of faculty and 
peers. Full details for the Graduate Professional 
Portfolio are included in the USC Upstate Gradu- 
ate Handbook. 

For either degree, a minimum grade point average of 
3.0 (B) is required on the total graduate program with a 
minimum average of B on all 700-800 level courses. An 
accumulation of grades below B on any 1 2 hours of graduate 



work attempted at the university will disqualify a student for 
a graduate degree. Professional development courses may 
be considered as part of a degree program if the coursework 
is consistent with the program. Questions should be directed 
to the Director of the Office of Graduate Programs. 

Every candidate admitted for the degree of Master of 
Education will have a faculty advisor with whom to plan 
a program of study to assure professional competence and 
breadth of knowledge. Students will have the privilege of 
requesting a particular advisor, subject to consent of the 
faculty member involved and approval by the director of 
Graduate Programs. The advisor will be a specialist in the 
candidate's major area of study. 

No academic program of study can be approved until 
the student has been fijlly admitted to the graduate program 
as a qualified degree candidate. Students are cautioned that 
graduate credit earned prior to fiill admission to degree 
candidacy may not be applicable toward the degree require- 
ments. No more than 6 hours of professional development 
courses may be used in a degree program. A maximum 
of 6 hours of reduced tuition rate courses (standard 
graduate-level contract courses) may be presented on 
a graduate student's program of study. Each academic 
unit must approve the inclusion of reduced tuition rate 
graduate-level course work on the program of study. 
The program of study should be established immediately 
after full admission to the program; the program of study is 
completed with a student's assigned advisor or the director 
of graduate programs. 

Both the early childhood and the elementary master's 
programs are now offered in a Fast Track arrangement, en- 
abling students to complete the entire degree in 1 8 consecutive 
months. Though the rotation of courses will remain constant, 
graduate candidates may elect to complete their degrees at 
a slower pace, as long as the degree is completed within six 
years. 



Master of Education in Early Childhood Education 
Student Worksheet 

Core Required Courses (18 credits) 

SECH 608: Parent Involvement 

in Early Childhood Education 
SERM 700: Introduction to Research 

in Education 
SEPY705: Children and Adolescents 

as Learners 
SECH 740: The Young Child: 

Applying Theory and Research 
SECH 742: Advanced Study of Early 

Childhood Curricula and Program Models 
SEEN 744: Philosophy and Education 



SECH 794: Types of Early Childhood 

Centers 

SECH 811: Current Trends and Issues 

in Early Childhood Education 

SEDL 642: Teaching Mathematics to 

Young Children 

SLCY 722: Developing Literacy from 

Kindergarten through Second Grade 



III. Related Study (3-6 credits) 



II. Specialized Early Childhood Requirements 
(9-12 credits) selected from 

SECH 744: Advanced Study 

of Language Development and 
Communication Skills in Early 
Childhood Education 

SECH 750: Play Theory 

and Early Learning 



IV. Final Seminar (3 credits) 

SECH 797: Seminar in Early 

Childhood Education 

V. Graduate Professional Portfolio' 



224 



'Refer to the USC Upstate sradiiale handbook for details. 

Graduate Studies 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Master of Education in Early Childhood Education 
Fast Track Rotation' 



Spring 

SERM 700: Introduction to Research in Education , 

SEEN 744: Philosopiiy and Education 

SECH 742: Advanced Study of Early Childhood 

Curricula and Program Models 



Summer 

SEDL 642: Teaching Mathematics to 

Young Children 3 

SECH 744: Advanced Study of Language Development 
and Communication Skills in Early Childhood 
Education 3 

SEPY 705: Children and Adolescents as Learners 3 



'Both the early childhood and the elementary master's programs 
are now ojfered in a Fast Track arrangement, enabling students to com- 
plete the entire degree in 10 consecutive months. Though the rotation of 
courses will remain constant, graduate candidates may elect to complete 
their degrees at a slower pace, as long as the degree is completed within 
six years. 



Fall 

SLCY 722: Developing Literacy from Kindergarten 

through Second Grade 3 

SECH 608: Parent Involvement in Early Childhood 

Education 3 

SECH 740: The Young Child: Applying Theory 

and Research 3 

Spring 

SECH 750: Play Theory and Early Learning 3 

SECH 797: Seminar in Early Childhood Education 3 

Summer 

SECH 794: Types of Early Childhood Centers 3 

Total Hours 36 



Graduate Studies 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



225 



Master of Education in Elementary Education 
Student Worksheet 



I. Core Required Courses (15 credits) 

SERM 700: Introduction to Research in 

Education 
SEPY 705: Children and Adolescents 

as Learners 

SEEN 744: Philosophy and Education 

SEDL 715: Elementary School 

Curriculum 



SEDL 720: Middle School Curriculum 
and Organization 
SEDL 717: Curriculum Problems 
in the Elementary School 



II. Content Methods Courses (12-15 credits) 

L Literacy area: 

SLCY722: Developing Literacy 

from Kindergarten through Second 

Grade (recommended for primary 

grade teachers) 
SLCY723: Developing Literacy 

from Grades Three through Eight 
SLCY728: Reading and Writing 

in the Content Areas 
2. Social studies area: 
SEDL 760: Social Studies 

in Elementary/Middle School 



III. 



3. Science area: 

SEDL 615: Science in the 

Elementary School 

4. Mathematics area: 

SEDL 642: Teaching Mathematics 

to Young Children (recommended for 
primary grade teachers only) 

SEDL 645: Diagnostic Teaching 

of Arithmetic 

SEDL 745: Teaching Elementary 

Problem Solving, Geometry, and 
Measurement Topics 

Related Study (3-6 credits) 



IV. Final Seminar (3 credits) 

SEDL 780: Seminar in Elementary 

Education 

V. Graduate Professional Portfolio' 



'Refer to the USC Upstate graduate handbook for details. 



Master of Education in Elementary Education 
Fast Track Rotation' 



Spring 

SERM 700: Introduction to Research in Education 3 

SEEN 744: Philosophy and Education 3 

SECH 715: Elementary School Curriculum 3 

Summer 

SEDL 642: Teaching Mathematics to 

Young Children 3 

SEDL 615: Science in the Elementary School 3 

SEPY 705: Children and Adolescents as Learners 3 

FaU 

SLCY 722: Developing Literacy from Kindergarten 

through Second Grade 3 

SEDL 745: Teaching Elementary Problem Solving 3 

SECH 717: Curriculum Problems in the Elementary 

School 3 



Spring 

SLCY 723: Developing Literacy from Grades Three 

through Eight 3 

SECH 780: Seminar in Elementary Education 3 

Summer 

SECH 794: Social Studies in Elementary/ 

Middle School 3 

Total Hours 36 



'Both the early childhood and the elementary master's programs 
are now offered in a Fast Track arrangement, enabling students to 
complete the entire degree in 10 consecutive months. Though the rota- 
tion of courses will remain constant, graduate candidates may elect 
to complete their degrees at a slower pace, as long as the degree is 
completed within six years. 



226 



Graduate Studies 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Master of Education in Special Education: Visual Impairment 



The Master of Education degree in Special Educa- 
tion: Visual Impairment is a degree offered collaboratively 
by use Upstate and the South Carolina School for the Deaf 
and the Blind. Orientation sessions for potential candidates 
are offered prior to the beginning of the summer sessions 
and at the beginning of the fall semester. More informa- 
tion about this program is available from the USC Upstate 
Graduate Programs Office at 864-503-5573. 

The masters in Special Education-Visual Impair- 
ment requires: 

1. Successfiil completion of an approved pro- 
gram of study providing 39 hours of graduate 
credit. 

2. Successful completion of a case study 
demonstrating competency in working with 



individuals with visual impairment. The 
portfoliowill be a requirement in SVIP 735: 
Practicum in Special Education. 

For the degree, a minimum grade point average 
of 3.0 (B) is required on the total graduate program. An 
accumulation of grades below B on 12 hours of graduate 
work attempted at the university will disqualify a student 
for a graduate degree. 

Every candidate admitted for the degree of Master of 
Education in Special Education - Visual Impainnent will 
have a faculty advisor assigned to monitor the program 
of study. The program is a Cohort model intended to be 
completed in two calendar years; however the program 
may be extended over four years. Embedded in degree 
requirements are courses required for an endorsement in 
vision education. 



Master of Education in Special Education: Visual Impairment 
Student Worksheet 



I. Research Competencies (3 credits) 

SERM 700: Introduction to Research in 3 

Education 

II. Professional Studies (6 credits) 

SLCY 722: Developing Literacy from 3 

Kindergarten through Second Grade 

SEPS725: Advanced Study of K- 12 3 

Curriculum 

III. Visual Impairment Studies (29 credits) 

SVIP 610: The Nature and Needs of 3 

Learners with Visual Impairment 

SVIP 650: Anatomy, Physiology, and 3 

Disorders of the Visual System 



SVIP 675: Functional Low Vision 3 

Assessment and Intervention 

SVIP 705: Literary Braille Code 3 

SVIP 706: Advanced Braille 3 

SVIP 712: Assistive and Instructional 3 

Technology for Learners with Visual 

Impairment 

SVIP 717: Orientation and Mobility for 3 

Learners with Visual Impairment 

SVIP 724: Visual Impainnent and Multiple 3 

Disabilities 

SVIP 730: Assessment and Educational 3 

Methods for Learners with Visual Impairment 

SVIP 735: Practicum in Special 3 

Education- Visual Impairment 



Master of Education in Special Education: Visual Impairment 

Suggested Sequence of Courses 



First Year 

Summer I 

(Courses offered on the campus of tiie South Carolina 

Scliool for the Deaf and the Blind) 

SVIP 610 3 

SVIP 717 3 

Summer II 

SVIP 650 3 

Fall (Courses offered by Distance Learning) 

SVIP 675 3 

SVIP 705 3 

Spring 

SVIP 706 (course offered by Distance Learning) 3 

SERM 700 3 

( *course offered on campus in Spring for regional candidates. Candidates may 
also elect to take SERM 700 in DVD format from Columbia in the Summer.) 

Graduate Studies 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Second Year 

Summer I 

(Courses offered on the campus of the South Carolina 

School for the Deaf and the Blind) 

SVIP 71 2 3 

SVIP 730 3 

Fall (Courses offered by Distance Learning) 

SVIP 724 3 

SEPS725 3 

Spring (Courses offered by Distance Learning) 

SVIP 735 3 

SLCY 722 3 

Total Hours 39 



227 



Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of 
Other Languages (TESOL) K-12 



A Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Teaching English to 
Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) K-12 is designed for 
K-12 school personnel who wish to advance their professional 
development and enhance their knowledge and expertise in 
Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) 
but are not seeking a masters degree. 

This is a non-degree program and it does not grant the 
Stateof South Carolina add-on TeachingCertificate in ESOL.The 
courses included in the program do cover areas currently listed 
in the South Carolina Teacher Certification Manual for a K-12 
ESOL Certification in the State of South Carolina. Teachers with 
knowledge and skill in teaching second language learners are 
needed at every grade level. ESOL endorsement may be added 
to any certificate: early childhood, elementary, middle grades, 
secondary, special education, or physical education. Additional 
courses may be needed in order to meet all certification require- 
ments depending on a candidate's academic background. Please 
consult the SDE Certification Office if in need of additional 
information. Certification regulations may be changed by the 
State of South Carolina. 

use Upstate Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in TESOL 
program is not de^signed for the purpose of initial teacher cer- 
tification. Initial teacher certification is required for admission 
to the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate program. 

The Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in TESOL program 
requires: 

1 . Successfijl completion of an approved program of 
study providing 1 5 hours of graduate credit, of which at least 
80 percent must be earned in courses numbered 700 or above 
(the remainder may be in courses numbered 500-699). 

For the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in TESOL pro- 
gram, a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B) is required on 
the total Post-Baccalaureate Certificate program with a minimum 
average of B on all 700-800 level courses. An accumulation of 
grades below B on any 12 hours of graduate work attempted 
at the University will disqualify a student for the Post-Bacca- 
laureate Certificate. Professional development courses may be 



considered as part of a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate program if 
the coursework is consistent with the program. Questions should 
be directed to the Director of Graduate Programs. 

Every candidate admitted to the Post-Baccalaureate 
Certificate in the TESOL program will have a faculty advisor 
with whom to plan a program of study to assure professional 
competence and breadth of knowledge. Students will have the 
privilege of requesting a particular advisor, subject to consent 
of the faculty member involved and approval by the Director 
of Graduate Programs. 

No academic program of study can be approved 
until the student has been admitted to the Post-Baccalaureate 
Certificate program. Students are cautioned that graduate credit 
earned prior to fiill admission to degree candidacy may not be 
applicable toward the certificate requircTnents. No more than 
3 hours may be transferred into the Post-Baccalaureate Certifi- 
cate in the TESOL program. A maximum of 6 hours of reduced 
tuition rate courses (standard graduate-level contract courses) 
may be accepted. Each academic unit must approve the inclu- 
sion of reduced tuition rate graduate-level course work on the 
program of study. The program of study should be established 
immediately after admission to the program; the program of study 
is completed with a student's assigned advisor or the Director 
of Graduate Programs. 

The Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in the TESOL 
program is offered in a 1 2 consecutive month sequence. These 
graduate level courses will be offered in the day during the first 
summer session and late in the afternoon during fall and spring 
semesters, making the program accessible to individuals who are 
in-service teachers. The fall and spring courses require practi- 
cum experiences; students must work directly with speakers of 
other languages either in after-school or weekend programs to 
meet course expectations. Though the rotation of courses will 
remain constant, graduate candidates may elect to complete their 
program at a slower pace, as long as the program is completed 
within three years. 



Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of 
Other Languages (TESOL) K-12 



Student Worksheet 

I. Specialized Preparation (12 credits) 

SSLL 708: Introduction to Linguistics 

SSLL 718: Techniques for Teaching English 

to K-12 Second Language Learners 

SSLL 728: Literacy Instruction for K-12 

Second Language Leaniers 

SSLL 760: Practicum in Teaching English 

to K-12 Second Language Learners* 
*Practicum hours are split and are corequisites for 
SSLL 718 and SSLL 728. 

II. Elective, one from the following (3 credits) 

SSLL 748: Linguistic and Cultural 

Diversity 
SSLL 758: Assessment of K-12 

Second Learners* 
SEPS 732: Enhancing Learning fo 

Diverse Cultures 
*Also requires one corequisite practicum hour 



Suggested Sequence of Courses 

Summer I 

SSLL 708: Introduction to Linguistics 3 

Fall 

SSLL 718: Techniques for Teaching English to 3 

K-12 Second Language Learners 
SSLL 760: Practicum in Teaching English to 1 

K-12 Second Language Learners 
SEPS 732: Enhancing Learning for Diverse 3 

Cultures' 
Spring 
SSLL 728: Literacy Instruction for K-12 Second 3 

Language Learners 
SSLL 760: Practicum in Teaching English to K-12 2 

Second Language Learners 
or other elective 



228 



Graduate Studies 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Additional requirements for the State of Soutli Carolina 
add-on Teaching Certificate in ESOL 



Bachelor's degree 

Temporary, initial, or professional certificate at the 
elementary, middle, secondary orpre-K-12 level 
Minimum qualifying score(s) on the South Caro- 
lina content area examination(s) required by the 
State Board of Education 

Second language learning experiences document- 
ed by any one of the following: 

• six semester hours in a single second lan- 
guage; 

• completion of intensive language training by 
the Peace Corps, the Foreign Service Institute 
or the Defense language Institute; 

• placement in a third-year-level course in the 
foreign language department at an accredited 



college or university; or 
• demonstration of second-language profi- 
ciency in a language that is unavailable at 
accredited institutions through verification 
in writing from an official designated by the 
State Department of Education. 
* For the purpose of the State of South Carolina add- 
on Teaching Certificate in ESOL the Practicum may 
be waived based on one year's experience teaching 
ESOL. 

From State Dept. of Education updated July 2004, 
http://www.scteachers.org/cert/Certpdf/TeacherCertifi- 
cationManual.pd 



Graduate Course Descriptions 



Early Childhood Education (SECH) 

SECH 541. Integrated Early Childhood Curriculum 

I (3) Integration of content areas within the curriculum 
emphasizing mathematics and sciences. Learning activi- 
ties, materials and equipment. Multicultural influences and 
needs of exceptional children are addressed. 

SECH 542. Integrated Early Childhood Curriculum 

II (3) Integration of content areas within curriculum em- 
phasizing language arts, reading and fine arts. Learning 
activities, materials, equipment. Multicultural influences 
and needs of exceptional children are addressed. 

SECH 608. Parent Involvement in Early Childhood 
Education (3) Analysis of programs and practices for 
involving parents in early childhood educational settings. 
Emphasis on objectives, methods, techniques and materi- 
als for program development. Community resources for 
supporting programs for children in various instructional 
settings. 

SECH 698. Topics in Early Childhood Education (1-3) 

SECH 699. Independent Study (3) 

SECH 712. Practicum in Parent Involvement in 
Early Childhood Education (3) School- and home-based 
experience with parents. Emphasis is upon home-school 
relationships and their effects upon the young child's 
development and learning. Participation with advisory 
groups, parent activities in the classroom, home visits, and 
parent-teacher communication. Weekly seminar sessions. 
Prerequisite: SECH 608. 

SECH 740. The Young Child: Applying Theory and Re- 
search (3) Analysis and discussion of theory and research 
related to the education of young children. Intellectual, 
social, emotional and physical development of infants. 



toddlers and young children will be examined. Special 
emphasis on implication for developing early childhood 
educational instructional programs. Prerequisite: SEPY 

705. 

SECH 742. Advanced Study of Early Childhood Cur- 
ricula and Program Models (3) An analysis of early 
childhood program models and curricula with theoreti- 
cal orientation, related research, societal needs, and the 
student's philosophy of education. 

SECH 744. Advanced Study of Language Development 
and Communication Skills in Early Childhood Educa- 
tion (3) Provides classroom teachers with an overview of 
the development of language and communication skills 
in children, birth through eight. 

SECH 750. Play Theory and Early Learning (3) Theory, 
research and practices related to the play of young children 
in various instructional settings. 

SECH 794. Types of Early Childhood Centers (3) 

An overview of the function, funding, management and 
organization of the many varied programs for young 
children, including research centers, private and agency 
controlled schools. 

SECH 797. Seminar in Early Childhood Education 

(3) Synthesis of development, cuniculum, cognition and 
related issues in early childhood education. Prerequisites: 
30 hours of Program of Study courses completed including 
SEPY 705, SERM 700, SEFN 744 and SECH 742. 

SECH 811. Current Trends and Issues in Early Child- 
hood Education (3) Early childhood education is a new, 
developing and rapidly changing field; this course presents 
an evaluation of current programming. Extensive use will 
be made of ERIC and similar services. An analysis of 



Graduate Studies 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



229 



what is taking place currently in various innovative and 
experimental centers. 

SECH 812. Practicum In Early Childhood Education 

(3-6) Open only to teachers and graduate students who 
have had no experience or training for work with children 
below the first grade, especially those desiring certifica- 
tion. Supervised school-based experiences and related 
seminar participation will be required. Prerequisites: 
SEDE 420 and 422. 

Educational Psychology (SEPY) 

SEPY 705. Children and Adolescents as Learners (3) 

Focus on the relationship between growth and development 
(cognitive, social, emotional, and physical) and learning 
for children and adolescents. Particular attention will be 
given to developmentally appropriate teaching practice, 
learning differences, and learning difficulties. 

Elementary Education (SEDL) 

SEDL 544. Modern Approaches to Mathematics Teach- 
ing (3) Curriculum and pedagogy for mathematics topics 
taught in grades 3 through 8. 

SEDL 615. Science in the Elementary School (3) Rein- 
forces the science background of practicing elementary 
teachers. Innovations are examined. Emphasis is placed 
on methods, materials, community resources and evalu- 
ation procedures. 

SEDL 642. Teaching Mathematics to Young Children 

(3) Analysis of a developmental approach to teaching 
children under the age of nine. 

SEDL 645. Diagnostic Teaching of Arithmetic (3) 

Analysis of the concepts and skills of arithmetic in the 
school mathematics curriculum; exploration of diagnostic- 
prescriptive teaching methods. 

648. Teaching Mathematics to Students in Grades 4-6 

(3) Instructional approaches and materials for teaching 
elementary school mathematics, grades 4-6. 

SEDL 698. Topics in Elementary Education (1-3) 
SEDL 699. Independent Study (3) 

SEDL715. The Elementary School Curriculum (3) Criti- 
cal study of the modem elementary school curriculum. 

SEDL 717. Curriculum Problems in the Elementary 
School (3) A careful examination of the persistent prob- 
lems of elementary schools (grouping, promotions, etc.) 
and the best solutions in terms of research findings and 
expert opinion. Prerequisite: SEDL 715. 

SEDL 720. Middle Organization and Curriculum (3) 

An overview of the development of the middle school, 
history, purposes and organization and an in-depth analy- 
sis of middle school organization and curriculum. The 
characteristics of middle school students, methods of 



evaluating students, and the overall curricular program 
are also considered. 

SEDL 745. Teaching Elementary Problem Solving, 
Geometry, and Measurement Topics (3) Analysis of 
the school curriculum and instructional methods in the 
designated areas of mathematics; exploration of appropri- 
ate outcomes of instruction. 

SEDL 760. Implementing Social Studies in the El- 
ementary/Middle School (3) The selection of teaching 
procedures and instructional materials used to teach social 
studies in the elementary school will be investigated. 

SEDL 780. Seminar in Elementary Education (3) Stu- 
dents will synthesize their graduate studies for a master's 
degree in elementary education. Prerequisites: 30 hours of 
Program of Study courses which must include SEPY 705, 
SERM 700, SEEN 744 and SEDL 715 or SEDL 720. 

SEDL 783. Advanced Study of the Teaching of Math- 
ematics in the Middle or Junior High School (3) His- 
torical developments and recent innovations in curricula, 
resources, and techniques in the teaching of mathematics 
in the middle or junior high school. Investigative research 
into the improvement of instruction is required. 

Foundations of Education (SEEN) 

SEEN 744. Philosophy and Education (3) The func- 
tional considerations governing educational theories and 
practices. 

Professional Studies (SEPS) 

SEPS 699. Directed Studies in Education (1-3) In- 
depth investigation of a special topic in education. Fully 
admitted graduate students will have opportunity to work 
individually with a faculty member to pursue a topic of 
interest. Prerequisite: Admission as a degree seeking 
graduate student in education. 

SEPS 715. Advanced Perspectives on Educating In- 
dividuals with Disabilities (3) Advanced foundation 
course for understanding perspectives of special educa- 
tion and disability services, including historical trends 
and philosophical perspectives; comparative practice of 
service delivery; policy formulation and analysis; and 
advocacy roles and activities. 

SEPS 725. Advanced Study of K-12 Curriculum (3) 

Advanced study of foundations for development, histori- 
cal context, determinants, content, organization, planning, 
design and strategies for change of K-12 curricula. The 
role of teachers in the creation, evaluation and revision 
of K-12 curriculum is examined. 

SEPS 732. Enhancing Learning Environments for 
Diverse Cultures (3) An exploration of the knowledge, 
skills, and attitudes essential for teaching children from 
diverse cultures. Though the course will investigate the 
history and characteristics diverse cultures, the focus of 
the course will be on promoting the academic and personal 



230 



Graduate Studies 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



success of these children through appropriate learning 
settings and effective classroom instruction. 

Literacy Education (SLCY) 

SLCY 722. Developing Literacy from Kindergarten 
through Second Grade (3) Literacy instruction from oral 
language through emergent literacy. Emphasis will be 
placed on developing phonemic awareness and concepts 
about print, and on scaffolding the transition through emer- 
gent literacy into the initial stages of reading and writing. 
Related, developmentally appropriate assessments will be 
considered as tools for focusing literacy support. 

SLCY 723. Developing Literacy from Grades Three 
through Eight (3) Literacy instruction in grades three 
through eight supporting the transition of learners from 
the initial stages of reading and writing into fluency. Em- 
phasis will be placed on integrating literacy instruction 
throughout the curriculum. Developmentally appropriate 
literacy assessments as well as techniques for supporting 
struggling readers and writers will be included. 

SLCY 728. Reading and Writing in the Content Areas 

(3) A survey of reading and writing strategies for support- 
ing learning in the content areas. Attention will also be 
given to enhancing literacy skills of middle school and 
secondary school students. 

Research and Measurement in Education 
(SERM) 

SERM 700. Introduction to Research in Education (3) 

Emphasis on the major methods and techniques of research 
employed by students of education. 

Visual Impairment (SVIP) 

SVIP 610. Nature and Needs of Learners with Visual 
Impairment (3) A historical perspective, legal require- 
ments, ethics, accessibiliy issues, service delivery sys- 
tems, prevalence, etiologies, educational interventions, 
adaptive aids, and resources as it relates to the education 
of induviduals who are blind or visually impaired. The 
cognitive, linguistic, motor, sensory, and psychosocial 
development characteristics of children and youth with 
visual impairment are explored. 

SVIP 650. Anatomy, Physiology, and Disorders of the 
Visual System (3) Thorough review of the structure and 
fijnctioning of the eye and neurological system relating to 
visualization, congenital and acquired visual abnormalities 
and theireffects on functioning, ophthalmologic examination 
procedures, and ocularterminology. Educational relevance 
of course content is emphasized by interpretation of medical 
eye reports, visual screening, and intervention strategies 
used to accommodate residual vision. 

SVIP 675. Functional Low Vision Assessment and Inter- 
vention (3) Provide assistance to a learner with visual impair- 
ment who has residual, useful vision by means of optic aids and 
other adaptive devices. Functional assessment, ophthalmic 
and optometric consultation, and educational intervention 
constitute course content. Prerequisite: SVIP 650. 



SVIP 705. Literary Braille Code (3) A historical perspec- 
tive, review of devices used to transcribe braille, compre- 
hensive overview of uncontracted and contracted braille, 
and extensive practice in the production of literary braille 
by the use of the Perkins Brailler and a computerized Per- 
kins Braille emulator. Instruction begins with uncontracted 
braille and common contractions in a logical sequence until 
all contractions are covered and the student is proficient in 
reading and transcribing braille. 

SVIP 706. Advanced Braille (3) Transcription of math- 
ematics, science notation, music, and foreign language into 
braille on a Perkins Brailler and a computerized Perkins 
Brailler emulator. This course also includes instruction 
in using an abacus, creating tactile graphics, developing 
perceptual skills, using a slate and stylus, and teaching the 
Nemeth Braille Code to students who are visually impaired. 
Prerequisite: SVIP 705. 

SVIP 712. Assistive and Instructional Technology for 
Learners with Visual Impairment (3) Adaptive aids, elec- 
tronic devices, computerized Braille embossers, synthetic 
voice output, print reading programs and other software. 
Students learn about technological devices and become 
proficient in the use and instruction of these devices and 
programs. Prerequisite: SVIP 705. 

SVIP 717. Orientation and Mobility for Learners with 
Visual Impairment (3) Instruction in cane skills, orienta- 
tion, mobility, and activities of daily living for students 
with visual impairment. The role and responsibilities of 
the teacher in instruction and in relationship with a certified 
orientation and mobility professional are stressed. 

SVIP 724. Visual Impairment and Multiple Disabilities (3) 

TTiecumulativeeffectsof visual impaimientwithconcomitant 
disabilities on cognitive, sensory, motor, psychosocial, lin- 
guistic, and educational fijnctioning. Educational intervention 
strategies, service delivery models, legal implications, and 
the multidisciplinary team model are reviewed. 

SVIP 730. Assessment and Educational Methods for 
Learners with Visual Impairment (3) Formal and informal 
approaches to evaluation for development of individualized 
educational programs, materials, equipment, curriculum 
adaptations, resources, adaptive aids, and instructional 
strategies. Emphasis is on knowledge of resources, methods 
of teaching, and how to develop and implement appropriate 
educational programs for learners with blindness and low 
vision. Prerequisite: Completion of 2 1 credits in visual 
impairment courses. 

SVIP 735. Practicum in Special Education: Visual Im- 
pairment (3) Capstone field experiences and completion of a 
comprehensive case study and program portfolio. Candidates 
complete a minimum of 350 hours of supervised teaching of 
students with visual impairment. The program cumulative 
portfolio is completed, presented for committee review, and 
defended. Prerequisite or Corequisite: SVIP 730. 

Professional Development Courses 

Education (SDEU) 

SDEU 632. Professional Development: Field Problems 
in Education I (3) Selected educational problems will be 
identified and explored and probable solutions developed. 



Graduate Studies 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



231 



Emphasis will be on providing practicing school persoiinel 
an opportunity to work cooperatively, under supervision, 
toward solutions to problems that are of immediate concern 
to them. Activities will include seminars, review of litera- 
ture, observations, case studies, materials development and 
other applicable approaches. Emphasis will be placed on 
the development of a comprehensive proposal designed to 
alleviate or solve problems identified. 

Instruction and Teacher Education (SETE) 

SETE 610. Professional Development: Integrated 
Reading and Writing Instruction (3) Theoretical bases 
and techniques for teaching reading and writing in the 
elementary school, using multiple subject areas. 

SETE 611. Professional Development: Concepts and 

PracticesofW'holeLanguage(3) Development of concepts, 
materials, and practices to implement a whole language 
philosophy. Prerequisite: An introductory course in reading 
or permission of the instructor. 

SETE 612. Professional Development: Storytelling in 
the Classroom (3) Theoretical and practical applications 
of applying stories and storytelling to 4K-12 school cur- 
riculum. 

SETE 614. Professional Development: Storytelling 
and Creative Writing (3) Integrate proven exercises and 
techniques into the process of story conceptualization, cre- 
ation, and revision as a basis for teaching creative writing 
in the K-12 classroom. 

SETE 631. Professional Development: Using Comput- 
ers to Support Instruction (3) Applications of selected 
software in instructional management. 

SETE 633. Professional Development: Internet for 
Educators (3) Educational applications ofthe Internet in the 
context of teaching and learning. Practical understanding of 
how the Internet can be used as an educational resource. 

SETE 634. Professional Development: Integrating 
Multi-Media Technology in the K-12 Classroom (3) 

Utilization of technology in the classroom and for the 
development of information and presentation techniques 
by the classroom teacher. 

SETE 651. Professional Development: Selected Topics 
in Teaching Science (3) Primarily for elementary, second- 
ary and middle school teachers. Teachers at other levels 
may be accepted. 

SETE 655. Professional Development: Teaching En- 
vironmental Education (3) Rationale and strategies for 
teaching environmental education. 

SETE 660. Professional Development: Issues in Writing 
Instruction (K-12) (6) Issues in the teaching of writing, 
with emphasis on classroom applications K- 1 2 and program 
development. 

SETE 670. Professional Development: Career Tech- 
nologies (3) Development of understanding School-to- Work 
issues and developing curriculum that connects schools 
with the workplace. Strategies for using technological 
resources as diagnostic tools in the career development 
process are included. 



SETE 672. Professional Development: Educators in 
Industry (3) Provides educators opportunities to understand 
the changing world of work and the current technology of 
the workplace. Course includes on-site opportunities in 
today's worksite. 

SETE 680. Professional Development: Topics in Educa- 
tion (3) Exploration of a current topic in education with 
emphasis on classroom application. 

SETE 690. Professional Development: Issues and Trends 
in Education (1-6) Exploration of a current topic in educa- 
tion with emphasis on classroom application. 

Second Language Learners (SSLL) 

SSLL 708. Introduction to Linguistics (3) An overview 
of language and linguistics and their relationship to teach- 
ing and learning. Attention will be given to phonetics, 
phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics as they 
relate to linguistic theory; to issues of language use; to 
questions of language in the social context, particularly in 
the K-12 classroom; and to issues of language acquisition 
and language learning. 

SSLL 718. Techniques for Teaching English to K-12 
Second Language Learners (3) Principles and strategies 
for developing and implementing effective instruction for 
K- 1 2 second language learners. Attention will be given to a 
variety of philosophies and models for teaching English to 
second language learners, variables affecting the learning of 
English by second language learners, and learning strategy 
research. Corequisite: SSLL 760 ( I hour credit). 

SSLL 728. Literacy Instruction for K-12 Second Lan- 
guage Learners (3) Theories of first and second language 
acquisition and literacy acquisition. Attention is given 
to strategies and techniques for guiding second language 
learners through the reading and writing process and for 
assessing progress in literacy acquisition. Corequisite: 
SSLL 760 (1-2 hours credit). 

SSLL748. Linguistic and Cultural Diversity in Education 

(3) Impact of linguistic and cultural differences character- 
izing US classrooms today. Attention will be given to issues, 
challenges, and opportunities for teaching and learning 
resulting from diversity. Appropriate curricula, materials, 
assessment, and home-school collaboration strategies will 
be considered. 

SSLL 758. Assessment of Second Language Learners 

(3) Educational assessment of academic achievement K- 1 2 
second language learners. Content focuses on authentic 
assessment within the classroom, and includes psychometric 
statistics and theory, review of commonly-used standardized 
tests, appropriate modification of tests to achieve non-bias, 
and the review of legislative, legal, and ethical standards. 
Corequisite: SSLL 760 ( 1 hour credit). 

SSLL 760. Practicum in Teaching English to K-12 
Second Language Learners (1-3) Clinical experience 
to prepare teachers to provide effective teaching/learning 
experiences for K-12 second language learners. The fo- 
cus ofthe practicum will be the application of principles, 
guidelines, strategies and techniques appropriate for K-12 
second language learners. Corequisites: SSLL718(1 hour); 
SSL 728 (1-2 hours); SSLL 758 (1 hour, may be repeated 
up to three times). 



232 



Graduate Studies 
20082009 use Upstate Catalog 




Administration 
& Faculty 



Administration and Faculty 

The University of South Carolina Board of Trustees 

Mark Sanford, Governor of South Carolina, ex officio Chairman 

Herbert C. Adams, 8th Judicial Circuit 

Chairman 

Miles Loadholt, 2nd Judicial Circuit 

Vice Chairman 

Mack I. Whittle Jr., 13th Judicial Circuit 

Chairwian Emeritus 

Arthur S. Bahnmuller, 3rd Judicial Circuit 

William L. Bethea Jr., USC Alumni Association 

James Bradley, 6th Judicial Circuit 

Mark W. Buyck Jr., Gubernatorial Designee 

John W. Fields, 10th Judicial Circuit 

C. Edward Floyd, M.D., 12th Judicial Circuit 

Samuel R. Foster II, 16th Judicial Circuit 

William C. Hubbard, 5th Judicial Circuit 

William W. Jones Jr., 14th Judicial Circuit 

Toney J. Lister, 7th Judicial Circuit 

Darla D. Moore, Gubernatorial Appointee 

Michael J. Mungo, 11 th Judicial Circuit 

James H. Rex, Superintendent of Education 

M. Wayne Staton, 15th Judicial Circuit 

John C. von Lehe Jr., 9th Judicial Circuit 

Eugene R Warr Jr., 4th Judicial Citcuit 

Othniel H. Wienges Jr., 1st Judicial Circuit 

Thomas L. Stepp, Secretary 

Spartanburg County Commission for Higher Education 

James R. Smith, Chairman 

Terry L. Cash, Vice Chairman 

Charles H. Babb, Secretary-Treasurer 

C. Daniel Adams Harold E. Fleming, M.D., MBA John B. Travers 

J. Eugene Adams, Esq. Audrey T. Grant, Ph.D. L. Andrew Westbrook III 

Sheila Breitweiser, Ed.D. John S. Poole Donna Turner Williams 

William R. Cobb Albert V. Smith, Esq. Thomas R. Young III 

James Crook Milton A. Smith Jr. 

Ex Officio Emeritus Members 

Toney J. Lister, Esq. G.B. Hodge, M.D., Emeritus Chair 

John L. Cobb 
Cleveland S. Harley 

The Carolina Piedmont Foundation, Inc. 

Chartered on February 27, 1973, the Carolina Piedmont Foundation, Inc., exists to accept gifts of charitable, benevolent, 
cultural and educational purposes for the exclusive benefit and use of the University of South Carolina Upstate. Accredited 
as a nonprofit organization under section 501 (c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code, the Foundation raises private funds for 
facilities and programs, administers scholarships and supports USC Upstate public service activities. 

The Carolina Piedmont Foundation board of directors consists of 33 members who are committed to the growth and 
continued success of USC Upstate. Through their influence, guidance and counsel, and working in partnership with the 
administration, the Foundation is able to generate ftinds that directly impact the University through student scholarships, 
faculty development, new facilities, and cutting edge programs. 

234 Administration and Faculty 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Administration 



President, University of South Carolina 
Andrew A. Sorensen 

Chancellor, University of South Carolina Upstate 
John C. Stockwell 

Interim Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
Marsha A. Dowell 



Vice Chancellors 

Robert A. Connelly Jr., Business Affairs 

Michael Irvin, University Advancement 

Judith S. Prince, Greenville Campus 

Jeanne Skul, Information Technology & Services 

Sheryl Turner- Watts, Planning & Organizational Development 

Leon E. Wiles, Student & Diversity Affairs 



Academic Affairs 

Marsha A. Dowell, Interim Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

Jim A. Ferrell, Assistant Vice Chancellor Academic Affairs. Greenville Campus 

Donette Y. Stewart. Assistant Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Services 

York W. Bradshaw, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Frieda P. Davison, Dean of the Library 

Marsha A. Dowell, Dean of the Mary Black School of Nursing 

Charles A. Love, Dean of the School of Education 

Darrell F. Parker, Dean of the George Dean Johnson, Jr College of Business and Economics 

Louise Ericson, Director of Center for Student Success 

Regis Robe, Director of Center for International Studies 

Sherry McAdams, Director of Career Center 

Katy R. Murphy, Registrar 

Kim Jenerette, Director of Financial Aid 

Elaine Marshall, Director of Grants and Foundation Relations 



Athletics Department 

Mike Hall, Director of Athletics 

Tami Matheny, Associate Athletic Director/Senior Women s Administrator 

Bill English, Assistant Athletic Director for Sports Information 

Scott Larson, Associate Athletic Director for Compliance 
Sandy Sandago, Associate Athletic Director for Sports Medicine 
Jules BryantMsistant Athletic Director for Development & Special Events 
Katie Pate, Director of Marketing and Promotions 



Administration and Faculty 235 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Business Affairs 

Robert A. Connelly, Jr., Vice Chancellor for Business Affairs 

Connie Holloman, Director of Budgets and Fund Accounting 

Michael L. Bruce, Director of Risk Management 

Jerry Carroll, Director of the Bookstore 

Denis Ellinger, Director of Purchasing and Support Services 

F.D. Puncke, Director of Facilities Management 

Richard L. Scott, Director of Financial Services 

Judy Srock, Director of Special Events 



Cliancellor's Office 

Frances B. Krydynski, Executive Assistant to the Chancellor 
Monica A. Wienand, Senior Assistant to the Chancellor 



Planning and Organizational Development 

Sheryl Turner-Watts, Vice Chancellor of Planning and Organizational Development 

Sam Bingham, Director of Institutional Reporting & Data Analysis 

Brian Mallory, Director, Institutional Effectiveness & Compliance 

vacant. Director of Human Services 



Information Technology 

Jeanne Skul, Vice Chancellor for Information Technolog\> 

Randy Johnson, Director of Instructional Media Services 

Scott Corbin, Director of Information Systems 

Chris Hanke, Director of Network Services 

Tom Davis, Technology Training Specialist 

Jamie Aiello, Director of Client Services 

Cindy Jennings, Director of Instructional Technology 



Student Affairs 

Leon Wiles, Vice Chancellor for Student and Diversity Affairs 

Laura Puckett-Boler, Dean of Students 

and Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student and Diversity Affairs 

Ron Dalton, Director of Residential Life 

Frances Jarratt-Hortis, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Development 

Steve Hopkins, Director of Student Life 

Klay Peterson, Chief of University Police 

Lou Anne Webber, Director of Health Services 



University Advancement 

Susan A. Hodge, Senior Director of Development 

Michael Irvin, Vice Chancellor for University Advancement and 

Executive Director of the Carolina Piedmont Foundation 

Bea Walters Smith, Director of Alumni Relations and Advancement Services 



22S Administration and Faculty 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Faculty 



College of Arts and Sciences 

York W. Bradshaw, Dean; Professor. Sociology 
Ph.D., Northwestern University 

James W. Brown, Associate Dean; Professor, History 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Jennifer Parker, Assistant Dean; Associate Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 

Department of Languages, Literature and Composition 

Warren Carson, Department Chair; Professor, English; Coordinator of Academic Advising; Director, Gospel Choir 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Jane Addison, Instructor. English; Director, Writing Center 
M.Ed., Converse College 

Catherine G. Canino, Associate Professor, English 
Ph.D.. Arizona State University 

June C. Carter, Professor, Spanish 
Ph.D., University of Washington 

Peter Caster, Assistant Professor, English 
Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 

David Coberly, Assistant Professor Spanish 
Ph. D., University of Missouri-Columbia 

Jay Coffman, Instructor. German; Director. Language Lab 
M.A.. University of Illinois 

Brenda W. Davenport, Senior Instructor. English; Director English Composition 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 

Elizabeth S. O&y'xA^on, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, English 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Gabrielle Drake, Instructor Spanish 
M.A., Mississippi State University 

Douglas Jackson, Professor, Spanish 
M.A., Illinois State University 

Merri Lisa Johnson, Assistant Professor of English; Director for the Center for Women 's Studies 
Ph.D., SUNY-Birmingham 

Marilyn Knight, Associate Professor, English 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Celena E. Kusch, Assistant Professor English 
Ph. D., University of Wisconsin-Madison 

Thomas J. McConneli, Associate Professor, English; Director, Honors Program 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 



Mm'm'istraiion and Faculty 237 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Kathryn A. McLaughlln-Rojas, Instructor, English (TESOL); Assistant to the Director of International Studies 
M.A., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale 

David Marlow, Assistant Professor, English 
Ph. D., Ball State University 

Shannon Polchow, Assistant Professor, Spanish 
Ph.D.. University of California 

Danielle C. Raquidel, Professor, French, Spanish 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Tasha Thomas, Instructor 
M.Ed., Converse College 

Jorge A. Salvo, Assistant Professor, Spanish 
Ph.D., Florida State University 

George H. Williams, Assistant Professor, English 
Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Department of Fine Arts and Communication Studies 

James R. Cox, Department Chair, Professor, Speech, Theatre: Director, Shoestring Players 
M.A., University of South Carolina 

Gregg Akkerman, Assistant Professor, Music; Director, Jazz Band 
D.A., Northern Colorado University 

Lisa Anderson, Associate Professor, Graphic Design 
M.F.A., University of Idaho 

P. Kathryn Hicks, Emeritus Professor, Fine Arts 
M.F.A., University of Georgia 

Judy S. Curtis, Instructor Speech Communication 
M.A., Marshall University, West Virginia 

Mary Lou Hightower, Assistant Professor, Art Education; Director, FOCUS Gallery 
Ed.D., University of South Carolina 

Steve Knight, Assistant Professor, Theatre 
M.F.A., University of Oklahoma 

Raymond B. Lee, Emeritus Professor, Speech, Theatre 
Ph.D., Bowling Green State University 

Gary Mattingly, Instructor 
M.A., University of Florida 

Raymond J. Merlock, Professor, Journalism and Mass Communication 
Ph.D., Ohio University 

Cassandra S. Mitchell, Instructor, Journalism and Mass Communication 
M.A., University of South Carolina 

Benjamin Myers, Assistant Professor 
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 

238 Administration and Faculty 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Jane A. Nodine, Professor. Art: Director. .Art Gallery 
M.F.A., University of South Carolina 

Rich Robinson, Associate Professor. Theatre 
M.F.A., Florida Atlantic University 

Kevin Sargent, Assistant Professor. Speech: Director. Forensics 
Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Rachel Snow, Assistant Professor. Art History 

Ph.D., City University of New York the Graduate Center 

John C. Stockwell, Professor. Theatre 
Ph.D., Bowling Green State University 

Chioma Ugochukwu, Associate Professor. Journalism and Mass Communication 
Ph.D., University of Texas Austin 

Department of Informatics 

Ron Fulbright, Department Chair. Assistant Professor 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Linda Mesko, Instnictor 
M.S., University of Maryland 

Richard L. Routh, Instructor 

Ph.D., Air Force Institute of Technology 

Tyrone S. Toland, Assistant Professor 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Angelina Tzacheva, Assistant Professor 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina Charlotte 

Division of Mathematics and Computer Science 

Jerome L. Lewis, Department Chair: Professor. Computer Science 
Ph.D.. Clemson University 

Celia L. Adair, Distinguished Professor Emerita. Mathematics 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Chi-Kei Rick Chow, Associate Professor. Computer Science 
Ph.D., University of Louisiana Lafayette 

Daniel J. Codespoti, Distinguished Professor Emeritus. Computer Science 
Ph.D., Kansas State University 

Daniel W. Cooke, Associate Professor, Computer Science 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

Linda K. Cooke, Senior Instructor, Mathematics 
M.M., University of Tennessee 

Gamal N. EInagar, Professor. Mathematics 
Ph.D., Mississippi State University 

Linda P. Gilbert, Professor. Mathematics 
Ph.D., Louisiana Tech University 

Mmmstration and Faculty 239 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Muhammad Hameed, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 
Ph.D., New Jersey Institute of Technology 

Michael R. Harper, Senior Instructor Computer Science 
M.S., University of South Carolina 

Michael Hudak, Instructor Mathematics 
Ph.D., Ohio University 

Seunggeun Hyun, Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Charlotte 

Frank H. Li, Assistant Professor; Computer Science 
Ph.D., University of Memphis 

Bernard Omolo, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 
Ph.D., Texas Tech University 

Thomas J. Ordoyne, Senior Instructor Mathematics 
M.S., Clemson University 

Kenneth Pestka, Instructor, Computer Science 
M.S., Clemson University 

James D. Spencer, Professor Mathematics 
Ph.D., University of Nebraska 

Charles E. Stavely, Emeritus Professor Mathematics 
M.S., Memphis State University 

Alexandre Timonov, Associate Professor, Mathematics 

Ph.D., The Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences 

Millard B. Ulmer, Professor Mathematics 
Ph.D., University of Alabama 

Sebastian van Delden, Assistant Professor, Computer Science 
Ph.D., University of Central Florida 

Kelly Waters, Assistant Professor Mathematics 
Ph.D., Clemson University 

William H. White, Senior Instructor Mathematics 
M.S., Clemson University 

Christopher Woodard, Director of Math & Tutoring Services 
M.S., Clemson University 

Wei Zhong, Assistant Professor Mathematics 
Ph.D., Georgia State University 

Division of Natural Sciences and Engineering 

David K. Ferris, Division Chair; Associate Professor, Biology 
Ph.D., Texas A&M University 

Laura Bannan, Instructor Biology 
M.A., Appalachian State University 

240 Administration and Faculty 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Christopher M. Bender, Associate Professor, Chemistry 
Ph.D., Cornell University 

Lyie D. Campbell, Professor, Geology 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Sarah C. Campbell, Instructor, Biology 
M.S., University of South Carolina 

Jeannie M. Chapman, Assistant Professor, Biology 
Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina 

Alice R. Claggett, Senior Instructor, Chemistry 
M.S., University of Massachusetts 

Vincent A. Connors, Associate Professor, Biology 
Ph.D., University of Nebraska, Lincoln 

Kathleen Ferris, Instructor. Biology 
M.S., Texas A&M University 

Julian Green, Professor, Geology 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Richard Krueger, Associate Professor, Chemistry 
Ph.D., Duke University 

George M. Labanick, Professor, Biology 
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 

Richard LeBoeuf, Instructor, Engineering Technology Management 
Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo 

Andrew J. Leonard!, Instructor, Physics 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Lisa A. Lever, Professor, Chemistry 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Sylvia H. Moore, Instructor, Biology 
M.Ed., Converse College 

Gillian Newberry, Professor, Biology 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Melissa Pilgrim, Assistant Professor 
Ph.D., University of Arkansas 

John C. Riley, Associate Professor, Physics 
Ph.D., Duke University 

Astrid Rosario, Associate Professor, Chemistry 
Ph.D., Virginia Tech 

Ronald L. Sobczak, Professor, Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of Arizona 

Jack A. Turner, Professor, Biology 

Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 



Administration and Faculty 241 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Rhett Watson, Assistant Professor, Chemistry 
Ph.D., Clemson University 

Department of History, Political Science, Philosophy and American Studies 

Dwight E. Lambert, Department Chair; Professor Government and International Studies 
Ph.D., University of Florida 

James W. Brown, Professor, History; Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Richard E. Combes, Associate Professor. Philosophy 
Ph.D., University of Iowa 

Timothy M. Dale, Assistant Professor, Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

David W. Damrel, Assistant Professor Religion 
Ph.D., Duke University 

John B. Edmunds, Jr., Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Histoiy 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

T. Paul Grady, Assistant Professor, History 
Ph.D., College of William and Mary 

Qiliang He, Assistant Professor, East Asian History 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

James B. Griffis, Associate Professor, Philosophy 
Ph.D., University of Buffalo 

Carmen V. Harris, Associate Professor, History 
Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Alice H. Henderson, Distinguished Professor Emerita, History 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 

SFC Fred Keigley, Assistant Professor, Military Science 
B.A., University of South Carolina 

Carol Loar, Assistant Professor, History 
Ph.D., Northwestern University 

John Long, Assistant Professor Nonprofit 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

Robert B. McCormick, Associate Professor History 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Andrew Myers, Associate Professor, American Studies 
Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Trevor Rubenzer, Assistant Professor, Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 



242 Administration and Faculty 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Department of Sociology, Criminal Justice and Women's Studies 

Edward C. Babin, Chair; Associate Professor, Geography 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 

York W. Bradshaw, Professor, Sociology; Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 
Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Diane M. Daane, Professor, Criminal Justice 
J.D., University of Missouri-Kansas City 

Clifton P. Flynn, Professor, Sociology 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Judith A. Harris, Associate Professor Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Brigitte Neary, Associate Professor, Sociology 
Ph.D., Duke University 

Calvin Odhiambo, Assistant Professor, Sociology 
Ph.D., Indiana University 

Stephen E. Ruegger, Assistant Professor. Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi 

Reid C. Toth, Assistant Professor. Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Friedrich B. Wenz, Professor. Sociology, Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Lizabeth A. Zack, Assistant Professor, Sociology 
Ph.D., New School for Social Research, New York City 

Department of Psychology 

Yancy B. McDougal, Department Chair; Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Alabama 

Andrew Beer, Assistant Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Iowa 

Jan Yehl Griffin, Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., Northern Illinois University 

William J. Jenkins, Assistant Professor. Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Stephanie Keen. Assistant Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., Indiana University 

Judith B. Kizer, Professor. Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Florida 

E. Evan Krauter, Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., University of Rochester 

Administration and Faculty 243 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Karen J. Macrae, Distinguished Professor Emerita, Psychology 
Ed.D., University of Cincinnati 

Jennifer Parker, Associate Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 

Kim Purdy, Associate Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., Queens University 

Susan E. Ruppel, Assistant Professor, Psychology 
Ph.D., Texas Christian University 

Center for Nonprofit Leadership 

Theresa Ricke-Kiely, Director, Center for Nonprofit Leadership; Instructor 

Ed.D,, University of Sarasota 

Center for Women's Studies 

MerrI Lisa Johnson, Director. Center for Women 's Studies; Assistant Professor, English 

Ph.D., SUNY-Birmingham 

George Dean Johnson, Jr. College of Business and Economics 

Darrell F. Parker, Dean; Professor, Economics 
Ph.D., Purdue University 

Jerome V. Bennett, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Accounting 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina, CMA 

Steven D. Caldwell, Assistant Professor, Management 
Ph.D., The Georgia Institute of Technology 

James Cappio, Instructor, Marketing 
M.B.A., Darden School of Business 

Robert A. Connelly, Jr., Instructor, Economics 
M.A., Appalachian State University 

Elizabeth Cole, Associate Professor, Accounting 
Ph.D., Kent State University 

Richard Gregory, Assistant Professor, Finance 
Ph.D., Old Dominion University 

Lilly M. Lancaster, Professor, Management 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Bobby Medlin, Associate Professor 
Ph.D., Louisiana Tech University 

Theodore Morrison, Associate Professor, Accounting 
Ph.D., Mississippi State University 

Rosalind Paige, Associate Professor, Marketing 
Ph.D., Iowa State University 

Charles Reback, Instructor 
Ph.D., Clemson University 

244 Admimstration and Faculty 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



James W. Reese, Associate Professor, Economics 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

Sarah P. Rook, Professor, Economics 
Pii.D., North CaroHna State University 

Rob Routman, Assistant Professor, Business Law 
J.D., Georgia State University 

J. Frank Rudisill, Associate Dean: Associate Professor, Management 
Ph.D., Clemson University 

Stuart Shough, Senior Instructor, Accounting 
M.Acc, University of South Carolina, CPA 

T. Brian Smith, Instructor, Management of Information Systems 
M.M.I.S., Georgia College and State University 

Richard W. Stolz, Professor, Economics 
Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Faruk I. Tanyel, Professor, Marketing 
D.B.A., University of Tennessee 

William R. Word, Professor, Economics 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

School of Education 

Charles A. Love, Dean, Professor 

Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Jim Charles, Associate Dean, Professor 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Judy Beck, Professor 
Ph.D., University of Toledo 

Joseph Bowman, Professor Emeritus 
Ed.D.. University of South Carolina 

Cindy A. Cavanaugh, Assistant Professor 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 

Michaeleen Davis, Assistant Professor 
Ph.D., West Virginia University 

Valerie Duarte, Professor 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Rebecca Faulkner, Assistant Professor 
Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University 

Greta Freeman, Assistant Professor 
Ed.D., Western Carolina University 

Carol Gardner, Associate Professor 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina 



Administration and Faculty 245 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Joellen Harris, Associate Professor 
Ed.D., University of South Carolina 

Tina Herzberg, Assistant Professor 
Ph.D., Texas A&M University 

Angela Hinton, Assistant Professor 
Ed.D., University of South Carolina 

Laura Hooks, Associate Professor 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Marilyn Izzard, Associate Professor 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Frank Jambois, Instructor 

W. Jeffrey Kramer, Assistant Professor 
Ph.D., LaSalle University 

Linda Mims 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Holly Pae, Associate Professor 
Ed.D., West Virginia University 

Judith S. Prince, Associate Professor 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 

Thomas Reed, Associate Professor 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Stephanie Seay, Instructor 
M.Ed., Furman University 

Anne C. Shelley, Distinguished Professor Emeritus 
Ph.D., Indiana University 

Rebecca Stevens, Chair of Graduate Programs and Special Initiatives, Associate Professor 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Cecelia Toole, Assistant Professor 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Pamela Wash, Assistant Professor 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 



Mary Black School of Nursing 

Marsha Dowell, Dean: Professor, Adult Health 

M.S.N., University of Virginia; Ph.D., George Mason University 

Gayle Casterline, Associate Dean; Associate Professor, Nursing Administration 
M.S.N., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., Loyola University 

246 Administration and Faculty 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Darlene Amendolair, Assistant Professor, Nursing Administration 
M.N., University of South Carolina; Ph.D., Capella University 

Tracy Caldwell, Instructor Child Health Nursing 
M.N., University of South CaroHna 

Rebecca Carr, Assistant Professor, Adult Health Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia; Ph.D., Medical College of Georgia 

Susan Cherry-Casey, Instructor 
M.N., University of South Carolina 

Pat Clary, Instructor, Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing 
M.N., University of South Carolina 

Scarlett Conway, Instructor 
M.S.N.. University of Phoenix 

Kathy Dalton, Instructor 
M.S.N., Duke University 

Angelise Davis, Associate Professor Adult Health Nursing 

M.N., Emory University; D.S.N., University of Alabama at Birmingham 

Betty G. Davis, Associate Professor, Family Health Nursing 
M.S.N., Clemson University 

Jim Ferrell, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Greenville: Professor, Psychiatric /Community Mental Health Nursing 
M.N., University of South Carolina; Ph.D., Medical College of Georgia 

Christine Filter, Instructor 
M.S.N., Walden University 

Lynette Gibson, Associate Professor 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Tammy Gilliam, Assistant Professor, Adult Health Nursing 
M.N., ACNP, DNP, University of South Carolina 

Patty Harkins, Instructor, Adult Health Nursing, 
M.N., Memorial University of Newfoundland 

Linda E. Hayes, Instructor, Parent-Child Nursing 
M.N., FNP-BC, University of South Carolina 

Mary Lou Hodge, Instructor, Adult Health Nursing 
M.N., University of South Carolina 

Brenda Jackson, Senior Instructor, Mental Health Nursing 
M.N., University of Maryland 

Felicia Jenkins, Instructor 
M.S.N., Gardner- Webb University 

Cindy Jennings, Associate Professor Pediatric Nursing; Director, Institutional Technology 
M.S.N., University of Alabama-Birmingham 

Admin'tstration and Faculty 247 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Paula Jones, Instructor, Nursing Education 
M.S.N., Gardner- Webb University 

Anita Kelley, Instructor 
M.S.N., University of Alabama 

Toshua Kennedy, Instructor 
M.S.N./M.P.H., University of South Carolina 

Charlotte Koehler, Instructor. Maternal-Child Nursing 
M.N., University of South Carolina 

William Koehler, Instructor 
M.S.N., University of South Carolina 

Laura Leary, Instructor, Adult Health Nursing 
M.S.N., Clemson University 

Nataliya Lischenko, Instructor 

Ph.D., Institute of Pediatrics, Kyiv, Ukraine 

Robin McAbee, Instructor. Adult Health Nursing 
M.S.N., ACNP, University of South Carolina 

Patricia McCallister, Instructor 
M.N., University of Phoenix 

Barbara McCracken, Instructor. Adult Health Nursing 
M.S.N., Vanderbilt University 

Mary Myers, Instructor. Maternal-Child Nursing 
M.S., CNM, CDE, Medical University of South Carolina 

Dorothy Noone, Instnictor 
M.S.N., Gardner- Webb University 

Karen A. Peel, Associate Professor. Adult Health Nursing 
M.N., Louisiana State University Medical Center at New Orleans 

Diane Riel, Instructor 

M.S.N., MHA/MBA, University of Texas/Pfeiffer University at Charlotte 

JoAnn Rutherford, Instnictor 

M.S.N., Medical University of South Carolina 

Sharon H. Smith, Senior Instmctor. Adult Health Nursing 
M.S.. State University of New York at Buffalo 

Sharon T. Smith, Instructor, Maternal-Child Nursing 
M.S.N. , IBCLC, Clemson University 

Catherine B. Talley, Associate Professor, Adult Health Nursing 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

Mary Jo Tone, Emerita Professor, Psychiatric/Community Mental Health 
M.S., University of South Carolina 

Charlene Walton, Professor. Community Health Nursing 
Ed.D., Clemson University 



248 Administration and Faculty 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Helen West, Instructor. Psychiatric/Community Mental Health 
M.S., University of South Carolina 

Linda Westfield, Instructor 
M.S.N., Gardner- Webb University 



Center for International Studies and Language Services 

Regis Robe, Director 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Kathryn A. McLauglin-Rojas, Instructor. English (TESOL); Assistant to the Director of International Studies 
M.A., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale 



Library 

Frieda M. Davison, Dean of the Library. Librarian 
MLS, University of Kentucky 

Natalie Childs, Instructor 

MLIS, University of South Carolina 

Laura Karas, Instructor 

MLIS, University of South Carolina 

Andrew Kearns, Assistant Librarian 

Ph.D., University of Illinois; MLIS, University of South Carolina 

Nancy Lambert, Librarian 
MLIS, University of South Carolina 

James LaMee, Instructor 

MLIS, University of South Carolina 

Camille McCutcheon, Associate Librarian 
MLIS, University of South Carolina 

Holle Schneider-Ricks, Assistant Dean; Librarian 
MLS, University of Maryland 

Karen L. Swetland, Assistant Librarian 
MLS, University of South Florida 

Christopher D. Vidas, Assistant Librarian 
MLIS, University of Pittsburgh 



Administration and Faculty 249 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Index 



Academic advisement 


49 


Academic calendar 


4 


Academic fees 


38 


Academic forgiveness 


57 


Academic grievances 


53 


Academic honors 


58 


Academic probation 


52 


Academic programs 


61 


Academic regulations, undergraduate 


47 


graduate studies 


219 


Academic standing 


52 


Academic suspension 


52 


Accounting major 


128 


Accreditation 


8 


ACHIEVE 


8 


Adding a course 


50 


Address change 


48 


Administration 


235 


Admission, undergraduate 


17 


application procedures 


17 


audit 


21 


concurrent high school seniors 


21 


course requirements, high school 


17 


former students (readmission) 


21 


freshman 


17 


international students 


21 


non-degree seeking 


21 


probationary 


18 


senior citizens 


22 


transfer 


18 


transient students 


21 


undergraduates with a degree 


22 


Admission, graduate 


218 


Advanced Placement (AP) 


54 


Advisement 




undergraduate 


49 


graduate studies 


219 


testing 


22,49 


African American Studies minor 


97 


Alcohol & drug education programs 


43 



American College Testing Program (ACT/PEP) 55 



Appeal 

of financial aid 27 

of academic grievances 53 

of academic requirements for admission 1 8 

Application fee 38 

Application for graduation 59 

Arts and Sciences, College of 81 

Languages, Literature and Composition 93 

Fine Arts and Communication Studies 82 

Informatics 100 

Mathematics and Computer Science 102 

Natural Sciences and Engineering 108 

Psychology 114 
History, Political Science, Philosophy 

and American Studies 116 
Sociology, Criminal Justice 

and Women's Studies 121 

Art Education major 87 

Art History minor 89 

Art Studio (graphic design) major 85 

Athletics, intercollegiate 10 

Attendance 5 1 

Auditing, undergraduate 49 

graduate courses 219 

B 

Biology major 108 

Biology minor 109 

Board of Trustees, use 234 

Bookstore 9 

Burroughs Child Development Center 10 

Business and Economics 126 



Calendar, academic 4 

Campus Access 11 

Campus Activities Board 44 

Campus facilities 10 

Campus map 12 

Campus media 44 

Carolina Piedmont Foundation 234 



250 



Index 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



Career Center 


9 


Criminal justice major 


123 


Change of campus 


49 


Criminal justice minor 


124 


Chemistry major 


110 






Chemistry minor 
Child care center 


111 
10 


D 




Code of Academic Integrity 


45 






Code of Student Behavior 


45 


Degree applications 


59 


Cognate 


64 


Degree, second undergraduate 


59 


College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 


54 


Dining services 


10 


Commercial Music, minot 


92 


Directions to campus (campus access) 


11 


Communication major 


82 


Directory information, release of 


60 


Computer information systems major 


104 


Disability services 


43 


Computer science major 


106 


Dropping a course 


50, 220 


Computer science minor 


107 


Drug and alcohol programs 


43 


Commission for Higher Education 


234 






Confidentiality of student records 


59 






Conflict Resolution minor 


91 


E 




Continuation standards 


52 






Counseling Services 


43 


Early childhood, major 


136 


Course(s) 
adding 
auditing 
changing sections 


50 
49 
50 


Economics/finance major 
Economics minor 
Education, School of 
academic requirements 


129 
130 
131 

134 


cognate 

course load (overload) 

descriptions 160-216. 


64 
49 

229-232 


admission to the professional program 
continuation standards 
degree programs 


133 
134 
135 


dropping 

dropping a graduate course 

electives 

general education 

numbering 

pass-fail option 

repeating 

senior seminar 

substitutions 

withdrawal from 


50 

220 

65 

62 

161 

50,221 

50 

64 

48 

50 


directed teaching 

student evaluation 

transfer admission 
Electives 

Electronic media, communication major 
Elementary education major 
Engineering Technology Management major 
English major, minor 
Examination fees 
Examinations 


134 

135 

134 

65 

84 
137 
112 
93,95 
38 
52 


Credit 

advanced placement 


54 


Extended Graduate Campus 


67 


by examination 


55 






ACT/PEP 


55 


F 




CLEP (College Level Examination Program 


) 54 




correspondence course 


56 






International Baccalaureate (IB) 
Dantes 


54 
55 


Facilities 
Faculty listings 


10 

237 


military service 


55 


Fees 


37 


non-collegiate programs 


56 


academic 


38 


transfer 


53 


application 


38 


transient 


53 


auditing 


38 


Index 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 






251 



Fees (cont.) 

diploma replacement 

examination/validation 

parking 

refunds 

reinstatement 

replacement identification card 

replacement treasurer's receipt 

senior citizens 

transcript 

tuition 

FERPA 

Film studies minor 
Final examinations 
Financial aid 

loans 

grants 

scholarships 

state programs 

satisfactory academic progress 

undergraduate assistantships 

work opportunities 

Fines 

Fraternities 
French minor 

G 

General education requirements 

Geography minor 

German studies minor 

Grade point average 

Grade reports 

Grade symbols 

Grades 

appeals 

transfer credit 
Grading system 

Graduate courses, undergraduate 
enrollment in 

Graduate studies 
academic regulations 

academic standards 

admission 

advisement 

appeal for reinstatement 

application for degree 



39 
38 
39 
39 
39 
39 
39 
38 
39 
38 

59, 222 
96 

52 
25 

27 
27 
30-36 
28 
26 
30 
29 

39 
44 
96 



62 

125 

97 

56 

57 
56 

53 
18 
56 

50,221 

217 
219 
221 
218 
219 
221 



attendance 

auditing 

course descriptions 

dropping a course 

grades and credit 

program of study 

state residency requirements 

tuition 

withdrawal 

Graduation requirements 
Graduation with honors 
Graphic design 
Greenville Campus 
Grievances 

academic 

non-academic 

H 

Health services 

Health-related fields 

History, Political Science, Philosophy 

and American Studies 
History major 
History minor 
History of University 
Honor lists 
Honors Program 
Honorary societies 
Housing (residential life) 



Identification cards 

Immunization 

Incomplete (grade) 

Indebtedness 

Independent study 

Information Management and Systems 

Insurance 

Interdisciplinary Studies, Center for 

International student admission 

International Studies, Center for 

International Studies minor 

International Baccalaureate Diploma 

Program (IB) 
Internship 



221 
219 
229-232 
220 
220 
219 
223 
219 
220 

59 
58 
85 
13 

53 
45 



43 
65 

116 

116 

117 

8 

58 

69 

58 

43 



9 
22 
56 
48 
49 
100 
38 
74 
21 

9 
95 

54 
49 



252 



\ndex 
2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 



J 




psychology 


114 


Jazz studies minor 


92 


secondary education 




Johnson College of Business & Economics 


126 


biology 


141 


Journalism, communication major 


83 


chemistry 


142 


Journalism minor 


89 


English 


139 






mathematics 


143 


L 




social studies/history 


144 






Spanish 


140 


Law school (pre-law program) 


65 


sociology 


121 


Loans 


27 


Spanish 


98 






special education learning disabilities 


147 


M 




Make-up work 


52 






Management, major 


129 


Major, change of 


48 


Marketing, major 


129 


Major requirements 


64 


Mathematics and Computer Science 


102 


Majors, minors, and programs listing 


68 


Mathematics, major 


102 






Mathematics, minor 


103 


Majors 




Middle grades education major 


138 


art education 


87 






art studio (graphic design) 


85 


Minors 


64 






African American studies 


97 


biology 


108 










American studies 


120 


business administration 


128 










art history 


89 


accounting 


128 






economics/finance 


129 


biology 


109 






business administration 


130 


management 


129 






marketing 


129 


chemistry 


111 






commercial music 


92 


chemistry 


110 










computer science 


107 


communication 


82 










conflict resolution 


91 


theatre, speech, journalism and 








electronic media 




criminal justice 


124 






economics 


130 


computer information systems major 


104 










English 


95 


computer science major 


106 










film studies 


96 


criminal justice 


123 










French 


96 


early childhood education 


136 






elementary education 


137 


geography 


125 






German studies 


97 


engineering technology management 


112 






English 


93 


history 


117 






international studies 


95 


history 


116 






information management and systems 


100 


jazz studies 


92 


interdisciplinary studies 


74 


journalism 


89 






mathematics 


103 


mathematics 


102 






middle grades education 


138 


nonprofit administration 


78 


nonprofit administration 


77 


philosophy 


120 






political science 


119 


nursing, four-year track 


156 






nursing, RN-BSN track 


159 


psychology 


115 


physical education / teacher education 


145 


sociology 
Spanish 


122 
99 


physical education / fitness-recreation 


146 


political science 


118 


Spanish translation/interpreting 


99 


Index 






253 


2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 









speech communication 

theatre 

women's studies 

Mihtary service school credit 
Mission statement 
Multicultural affairs 

Name change 

Natural Sciences and Engineering 
New Student Services 
Nonprofit Leadership, Center for 
Nonprofit administration major 
Nonprofit administration minor 
Non-degree seeking admission 
Non-traditional student services 
Nursing honor society 
Nursing, major 

Nursing, Mary Black School of 
admission policies 
advisement 
baccalaureate program 
continuation standards 
credit by examination 
curriculum 
readmission policy 
RN-BSN track 
special requirements 
transfer of credits 



o 



Opportunity Network 
Orientation programs 
Organizations 

academic and honorary 

special interest 
Overload, course 



Parking and traffic regulations 
Pass-fail option 
Pell Grants 



90 


Performance groups 


44 


90 


Physical education majors 


145, 146 


79, 125 


Philosophy, minor 


120 


55 


Political science, major 


118 


7 


Political science, minor 


119 


44 


Pre-chiropractic 


65 




Pre-dental 


65 




Pre-engineering 


65 




Pre-law 


65 


48 


Pre-medical 


65 


108 


Pre-occupational therapy 


65 


22 


Pre-optometry 


65 


77 


Pre-pharmacy 


66 


77 


Pre-physical therapy 


65 


78 


Pre-speech pathology 


65 


21 


Pre-veterinary medicine 


65 


44 


Probation, academic 


52 


155 


Psychology major, minor 


114, 115 


156 


Public service (USC Upstate) 


8 




Publications, student (campus media) 


44 



149 
152 
152 
156 
155 
155 
151 
155 
159 
153 
155 



9 

22 

44 
44 
49 



45 
50,221 

27 



R 

Readmission of former students 2 1 

Recreation 44 

Refunds 39 

Registered nurse licensure 151 

Registration 49 

changes in 50 

Regulations, academic 47 

Repetition of courses 50 

Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) 66 

Residency requirement for graduation 59 
Residency requirements (state tuition) 40, 223 

Residential life 43 

Rights of catalog 48 



Scholars Academy 8 

Scholarships 30-36 

Schools 

Johnson College of Business & Economics 126 

Education 131 

Mary Black School of Nursing 149 

Second undergraduate degree 59 



254 



\n6ex 
2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



Secondary education major 

biology 

chemistry 

English 

mathematics 

social studies/history 

Spanish 
Section changes 
Security, campus 
Senior privilege 
Senior seminar 
Sociology, Criminal Justice and 

Women's Studies 
Sociology, major 
Sociology, minor 
Sororities 
Spanish, major 
Spanish, minor 
Special education, major 
Special programs 
Speech, communication major 
Student and Diversity Affairs 
Student conduct regulations 
Student development 
Student Government Association 
Student housing 
Student life 
Student media 
Student organizations 
Student records, confidentiality 
Student services 
Student Success, Center for 
Summer sessions 
Suspension, academic 



Transfer courses 



141 


substitution for USC Upstate courses 


48 


142 


suggested courses 


23-24 


139 


Transfer credit 


18,53 


143 


evaluation of 


18 


144 

140 

50 


validation 
Transient credit 


19 

53 


45 


Tuition 


38 


50,221 


u 




64 


Undergraduate Research and Scholarship, 




121 


Center of 


9 


121 


University, general information 


7 


122 


University Center, Greenville 


14 


44 


University Police Department 


45 


99 


Upward Bound 


8 


98 

147 


V 




65 






83 


Veterans Affairs 


9 


41 


Vision Statement 


8 


45 
43 


w 




45 






43 


Watershed Ecology Center 


80 


44 


Withdrawal from course 


50 


44 


Withdrawal from graduate studies 


220 


44 


Withdrawal from the University 


51 


59 


Withdrawal, post-semester (retroactive) 


51 


9 


Withdrawal, extenuating circumstance 


51 


9 


Women's & Gender Studies, Center for 


79 


50 


Women's Studies minor 


79, 125 


52 


Work opportunities 


29 



Testing, advisement 


22,49 


Tests 


52 


Teaching English to Speakers of Other 




Languages, Certificate 


228 


Theatre, communication major 


83 


Theatre minor 


90 


Three-Plus-One Program 


66 


Three- Year Degree Programs 


65 


Transcripts 


17,57,221 



Index 

2008-2009 USC Upstate Catalog 



255 



Notes 



256 Index 

2008-2009 use Upstate Catalog 




IS 
c 

C3